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September 2017

DragonFlyBSD 5.0 Branched As The Next Release

Filed under
BSD

We've known a new DragonFlyBSD release was being worked on for release soon. That release has now been branched, the first release candidate tagged, and it's being marked as version 5.0.

Succeeding DragonFlyBSD 4.8 will be DragonFlyBSD 5.0. 5.0.0-rc1 was tagged on Friday night while the code is branched for the 5.0 release undertaking. On Git master is now the DragonFly 5.1 development version.

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Our Last Time Benchmarking Ubuntu 32-bit vs. 64-bit

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Over the years we have looked at the 32-bit vs. 64-bit x86 Linux performance for curiosity sake, showing how x86_64 can be much faster than i686, and just providing these values for a reference look and if for some reason are still running 32-bit Linux software including the OS while the hardware is 64-bit capable. For this final benchmarking look are fresh numbers when doing a clean install of Ubuntu 17.10 32-bit compared to Ubuntu 17.10 64-bit.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Linux To Get "Extended LTS" Releases, Kernel Support For Six Years

    Linux right now offers a "Long Term Support" release where support for the kernel branch is maintained for two years, which is nice compared to kernel releases usually dropping maintenance around N+1.1 after the release. But moving forward, Linux LTS releases will now be maintained for six years.

    The two-year Linux LTS cycle is suitable for many users, but one case where it's not long enough is the lifecycle of a smartphone and the status quo is many Android phones out there are still running on Linux kernels no longer receiving bug/security fixes. Via Google's Project Treble and cooperation with the upstream Linux community, that two year process is now being extended to six years.

  • Mesa 17.2.2 Set For Release Next Week

    For those not comfortable riding Mesa Git, Mesa 17.2.2 is set to be released early next week as the newest stable update for the open-source 3D graphics driver stack.

    Point release manager Juan Suarez Romero of Igalia is planning on releasing Mesa 17.2.2 next Monday, 2 October, if all goes well. So far there are 43 patches queued and a handful of more patches still possibly landing. Friday marked the release candidate for this newest point release.

  • SELinux (Security-Enhanced Linux)

    SELinux, or Security-Enhanced Linux, is a part of the Linux security kernel that acts as a protective agent on servers. In the Linux kernel, SELinux relies on mandatory access controls (MAC) that restrict users to rules and policies set by the system administrator. MAC is a higher level of access control than the standard discretionary access control (DAC), and prevents security breaches in the system by only processing necessary files that the administrator pre-approves.

  • Alpine Linux

    Alpine Linux is a small, security-oriented, lightweight Linux distribution based on the musl libc library and BusyBox utilities platform instead of GNU. It operates on bare-metal hardware, in a VM or even on a Raspberry Pi. The distribution is noncommercial and evolved for embedded and server-based workloads, although desktop OS use is possible.

  • Red Hat Inc. Is on a Roll
  • Attend a Fedora Women Day 2017 event

    Fedora Women Day (FWD) is a worldwide series of events initiated by the Fedora Diversity Team. The events are dedicated to female contributors of the Fedora Project. During this day of celebration, local communities gather to present the accomplishments of women in the Fedora Project and thank them. FWD is also a great chance to promote the participation of more women and raise awareness about the gender gap in tech communities. Furthermore, FWD and events like it show the importance of diversity in open source projects such as Fedora.

  • Keep the Trump administration out of your private life with Tails 3.2 Linux distribution

    As we learned from the great patriot Edward Snowden, the US government can and will spy on you. Not caring about that invasion of privacy, and dismissing it with the flawed statement of "I have nothing to hide," is flat out idiotic. Regardless of what you do on your computer, or on the internet, your privacy is sacred, and quite frankly, it was earned by our forefathers that fought for our freedoms.

    If you do care about your privacy, and you want to keep the heavy-handed Trump administration or other government agency out of your private business, please know you aren't powerless. There is a specific Linux-based operating system that aims to protect your privacy from corrupt governments and other evildoers, such as hackers and spies. Called "Tails," it always runs in a live environment from a DVD or flash drive. In other words, especially with an optical disk, it will help to hide your footprints. Today, version 3.2 sees release.

Servers: Kubernetes 1.8, Blockchain, Microservices, Clear Linux

Filed under
Server
  • Kubernetes 1.8 Improves Security With Role-Based Access Control

    Version 1.8 of the open-source Kubernetes container orchestration and management platform is now available, providing features that improve both scalability and security.

    Kubernetes 1.8, released on Sept. 28, is the third major milestone release for Kubernetes in 2017 and follows the 1.7 update that debuted in June. The Kubernetes project was originally started by Google and has been managed as a Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) effort since July 2015.

  • Blockchain skills: Don't Try to Block the Chain

    Blockchain technology is on the rise. Some might presume Bitcoin is the reason behind it. While it was developed for the digital currency, developers are finding other uses of blockchain technology. Most prominently is the open source project Ethereum. The use of Ethereum has brought about smart contracts, which have proven to be quite functional within the financial industry. With its decentralized structure, blockchain technology could be a paradigm shift with vast boundaries.

  • DevOps Jobs: 5 must-reads for job seekers, hiring managers
  • Tools and Practices for Documenting Microservices
  • Clear Linux Can Run On AMD's EPYC Platform With Competitive Performance

    As part of our ongoing AMD EPYC Linux benchmarking, I've been working this week on a cross-distribution GNU/Linux comparison followed by some BSD testing... Of course, I couldn't help but to see if Intel's performance-oriented Clear Linux distribution would run on the AMD EPYC server.

OSS: Code for NFV (OPNFV), Code for '3D Selfies', Code for Beeline and More

Filed under
OSS
  • Network Functions Virtualization: All Roads Lead to OPNFV

    Previously in our discussion of the Understanding OPNFV book, we provided an introduction to network functions virtualization (NFV) and explored the role of OPNFV in network transformation. We continue our series with a look at chapters 4 and 5, which provide a comprehensive description of the various open source NFV projects integrated by OPNFV and the carrier grade features contributed back to these upstream projects by the community. In this article, we cover these two topics briefly and provide some related excerpts from the Understanding OPNFV book.

  • 3D selfies? What could possibly go wrong?

    The good news, then, is that this particular work only works on faces.

    The bad news? The code's on GitHub under an MIT licence.

  • Code for Beeline crowdsourcing transport app to be made open source

    The code for crowdsourcing transport app Beeline will be made open source from October onwards, in a move that could benefit app developers looking to develop new mobility solutions.

    [...]

    Announcing GovTech's plans to make the code open source on Saturday (Sep 30), the director of the agency's data science division, Liu Feng-Yuan, likened the move to sharing the "recipe" as to how the Government built the Beeline technology.

  • Facebook re-licenses React.js, a new open source tool from Oath, and more news

    Recently, Facebook drew the ire of the open source community by licensing React.js (a widely-used JavaScript library) under a so-called BSD + Patents license. That license drew fears of patent litigation and React.js was rejected by the Apache Foundation and WordPress decided to ditch it. As a result of the backlash, the social media giant has backtracked and re-licensed the library.

  • Syracuse Unbound releases second open source publication: CNY books and authors

    This is the second publication from the imprint, which offers open-access to the text through a Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives 4.0 International License, which means that the book is available for anyone to download and read for free. At last count the book has been downloaded 1,250 times  in 18 countries.

Security: Updates, EFI Mess, Clarence Birdseye

Filed under
Security
  • Security updates for Friday
  • An alarming number of patched Macs remain vulnerable to stealthy firmware hacks

    An alarming number of Macs remain vulnerable to known exploits that completely undermine their security and are almost impossible to detect or fix even after receiving all security updates available from Apple, a comprehensive study released Friday has concluded.

  • What Clarence Birdseye can teach us about container security

    Clarence Birdseye is generally considered to be the founder of the modern frozen food industry. In 1925, after a couple of false starts, he moved his General Seafood Corporation to Gloucester, Massachusetts. There, he used his newest invention, the double belt freezer, to freeze fish quickly using a pair of brine-cooled stainless steel belts. This and other Birdseye innovations centered on the idea that flash-freezing meant that only small ice crystals could form, and therefore cell membranes were not damaged. Over time, these techniques were applied to a wide range of food — including the ubiquitous frozen peas.

Graphics: Radeon, Intel, Mesa

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

More in Tux Machines

Programming/Development: C++, Go, Mozilla/Firefox and Python

  • Deliverable 1 : [✓]
    Seems okay, far better than the initial results. Although I should say, I deviated from what I thought I would need to write. First I assumed that I don’t have to write another boost::graph wrapper for KisPaintDevice, but I had to. That was one heck of an experience. In one of the last few posts, I ranted on Dmitry’s interpretation of the Graph, turns out we were on the same page but I understood his explanation the wrong way. I should put more attention to details from now on I guess. All the pixels are connected to each other, but they only have an edge between them if they are adjacent. If in center, the out degree would be 8, if in corners, 3 and if in edges, 5. There are some other cases too, but I will leave them for the moment. While writing the wrapper, I also got to know some of the cool features and techniques of C++, which I will be writing posts on as soon as I get some time, concepts, traits, avoiding virtual functions and what not. It is commendable that how boost approaches boost::astar_search, there is not a single virtual function, you don’t have to inherit anything (you can though for safety), just templates and traits, you are done.
  • Go Creeping In
    I’ve seen the inside of the Google and Amazon tech stacks. There are common threads that run through them and also, I bet, through most BigTechCos. Here and there down the stack is a lot of C++ and vestigial remnants from earlier days, Perl or PHP or whatever. Out in front of humans, of course, JS. But in between, there are oceans and oceans of Java; to a remarkable degree, it runs the Internet. Except for, here and there, you find a small but steadily increasing proportion of Go.
  • Stand by for FPR14 SPR1 chemspill
    Mozilla has shipped a fix for MFSA2019-18 in Firefox 67.0.3 and 60.7.1. This exploit has been detected in the wild, and while my analysis indicates it would require a PowerPC-specific attack to be exploitable in official TenFourFox builds (the Intel versions may be directly exploited, however), it could probably cause drive-by crashes and we should therefore ship an urgent fix as well. The chemspill is currently undergoing confidence tests and I'm shooting to release builds before the weekend. For builders, the only change in FPR14 SPR1 is the patch for bug 1544386, which I will be pushing to the repo just as soon as I have confirmed the fix causes no regressions.
  • PyPI Now Supports Two-Factor Login via WebAuthn
  • Understanding Python assignment
  • How to Publish Your Own Python Package to PyPI
  • PyCoder’s Weekly: Issue #373 (June 18, 2019)
  • EuroPython 2019: Community Discounts
  • EuroPython 2019: Inviting European Python Conference Organizers

today's howtos

All Linux, all the time: Supercomputers Top 500

Starting at the top, two IBM-built supercomputers, Summit and Sierra, at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Tennessee and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in California, respectively to the bottom -- a Lenovo Xeon-powered box in China -- all of them run Linux. Linux supports more hardware architectures than any other operating system. In supercomputers, it supports both clusters, such as Summit and Sierra, the most common architecture, and Massively Parallel Processing (MPP), which is used by the number three computer Sunway TaihuLight. When it comes to high-performance computing (HPC), Intel dominates the TOP500 by providing processing power to 95.6% of all systems included on the list. That said, IBM's POWER powers the fastest supercomputers. One supercomputer works its high-speed magic with Arm processors: Sandia Labs' Astra, an HPE design, which uses over 130-thousand Cavium ThunderX2 cores. And, what do all these processors run? Linux, of course. . 133 systems of the Top 500 supercomputers are using either accelerator or co-processor setups. Of these most are using Nvidia GPUs. And, once more, it's Linux conducting the hardware in a symphony of speed. Read more

Red Hat and SUSE Leftovers

  • Are DevOps certifications valuable? 10 pros and cons
  • Kubernetes 1.15: Enabling the Workloads
    The last mile for any enterprise IT system is the application. In order to enable those applications to function properly, an entire ecosystem of services, APIs, databases and edge servers must exist. As Carl Sagan once said, “If you wish to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first invent the universe.” To create that IT universe, however, we must have control over its elements. In the Kubernetes universe, the individual solar systems and planets are now Operators, and the fundamental laws of that universe have solidified to the point where civilizations can grow and take root. Discarding the metaphor, we can see this in the introduction of Object Count Quota Support For Custom Resources. In English, this enables administrators to count and limit the number of Kubernetes resources across the broader ecosystem in a given cluster. This means services like Knative, Istio, and even Operators like the CrunchyData PostgreSQL Operator, the MongoDB Operator or the Redis Operator can be controlled via quota using the same mechanisms that standard Kubernetes resources have enjoyed for many releases. That’s great for developers, who can now be limited by certain expectations. It would not benefit the cluster for a bad bit of code to create 30 new PostgreSQL clusters because someone forgot to add a “;” at the end of a line. Call them “guardrails” that protect against unbounded object growth in your etcd database.
  • Red Hat named HPE’s Partner of the Year at HPE Discover 2019
    For more than 19 years, Red Hat has collaborated with HPE to develop, deliver and support trusted solutions that can create value and fuel transformation for customers. Our work together has grown over these nearly two decades and our solutions now include Linux, containers and telecommunications technologies, to name just a few. As a testament to our collaboration, HPE has named Red Hat the Technology Partner of the Year 2019 for Hybrid Cloud Solutions.
  • Demystifying Containers – Part II: Container Runtimes
    This series of blog posts and corresponding talks aims to provide you with a pragmatic view on containers from a historic perspective. Together we will discover modern cloud architectures layer by layer, which means we will start at the Linux Kernel level and end up at writing our own secure cloud native applications. Simple examples paired with the historic background will guide you from the beginning with a minimal Linux environment up to crafting secure containers, which fit perfectly into todays’ and futures’ orchestration world. In the end it should be much easier to understand how features within the Linux kernel, container tools, runtimes, software defined networks and orchestration software like Kubernetes are designed and how they work under the hood.
  • Edge > Core > Cloud: Transform the Way You Want
    For more than 25 years, SUSE has been very successful in delivering enterprise-grade Linux to our customers. And as IT infrastructure has shifted and evolved, so have we. For instance, we enabled and supported the move to software-defined data centers as virtualization and containerization technologies became more prevalent and data growth demanded a new approach.
  • SUSE OpenStack Cloud Technology Preview Takes Flight
    We are pleased to announce that as of today we are making a technology preview of a containerized version of SUSE OpenStack Cloud available that will demonstrate a future direction for our product. The lifecycle management for this technology preview is based on an upstream OpenStack project called Airship, which SUSE has been using and contributing to for some time. This follows our open / open policy of upstream first and community involvement.