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October 2017

Wine 2.20

Filed under
Software

OpenIndiana Hipster 2017.10 Released with Latest X.Org Server, MATE 1.18 Desktop

Filed under
OS

The latest release, OpenIndiana Hipster 2017.10 arrived today with numerous changes and up-to-date components, including the latest X.Org Server 1.19.5 display server and corresponding libraries and drivers, ABI compatibility for using Solaris 10u10 binaries, as well as updated cluster suite and text installer.

"Text installer now can perform basic OpenIndiana installation to existing ZFS pool," reads today's announcement. "The option is considered advanced and should be used with care, but allows you to install minimal OI system to existing pool. To use it, press F5 on 'Welcome' screen."

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DebEX Barebone Linux Returns to LXDE, Now Based on Debian GNU/Linux 10 "Buster"

Filed under
Debian

Powered by the Linux 4.13 kernel series and based on the Debian Testing (upcoming Debian GNU/Linux 10 "Buster") and Debian Sid repositories, DebEX Barebone LXDE Build 171030 replaces the LXQt desktop environment that was used in previous versions with LXDE, probably to make the ISO smaller and the OS a bit faster.

"The ISO has decreased from 1860 MB to 1330 MB, which makes it easier to run the system live from RAM," said Arne Exton in the release announcement. "That ability allows DebEX LXDE to be very fast, since reading and writing data from/to RAM is much faster than on a hard disk drive."

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Solus 4 Linux OS to Bring Back Wayland Support, MATE Edition Will Get Some Love

Filed under
OS

First off, it looks like the Solus devs plan to re-implement support for the next-generation Wayland display server in their GNU/Linux distribution, though the ISO images will come with the 2D X.Org graphics driver enabled by default and use open source drivers for Nvidia GPUs as they want to further improve Nvidia Optimus.

"We're working to improve the NVIDIA situation and investigating a switch to libglvnd, enabling of wayland-egl/eglstreams, etc.," reads today's announcement. "We've moved back to open drivers to allow Ikey to further research NVIDIA Optimus. [...] We have no timeline on this but we're actively looking into it!"

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AMDGPU+RadeonSI Is Much Faster Than The Old Proprietary Fglrx Driver

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

With going back to test Ubuntu 14.04 through Ubuntu 17.10's Radeon OpenGL performance as part of marking AMD's open-source strategy turning a decade old, I also took this opportunity while having an old Ubuntu installation running to also re-test the former Catalyst/fglrx driver stack that's since been succeeded by AMDGPU-PRO and AMDGPU+RadeonSI.

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RPi Zero W clone offers quad-core power for $15

Filed under
Android
Linux

SinoVoip’s Linux-friendly, 60 x 30mm Banana Pi M2 Zero (BPI-M2 Zero) SBC closely mimics the Raspberry Pi Zero W, but has a faster Allwinner H2+.

Just as we were trumpeting the $23 BPI-M2 Magic as being the “smallest, cheapest Banana Pi yet,” SinoVoip has launched an even tinier and more affordable Linux/Android hacker board on AliExpress. The WiFi-enabled Banana Pi M2 Zero (BPI-M2 Zero), which was revealed back in July, is now selling for only $15 with the standard 512MB RAM, or $21.53 including shipping to the U.S.

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Games: Doom 3, Parkitect, Sphinx, Cursed Mummy,ATOM RPG, Darkest Dungeon, Intrinsic

Filed under
Gaming
  • Playing Doom 3 on Linux in 2017

    When I first started using Linux full time in 2007 gaming on the platform was dominated by id Software. Thanks to a flexible policy regarding unsupported binaries and a corporate culture open to experimentation, something which was lost not long after the Zenimax acquisition, Linux users were graced with both native closed source binaries for their latest games and a treasure trove of source ports for many of their older titles.

    Coming as it did only a few years after the fall of Loki Software and the dark age that followed it, Linux gaming received a major boost in 2004 with the release of Doom 3. Not only did it add one more title to the then nascent Linux gaming library, it was also one of the most anticipated games of the year and remained a graphical powerhouse for many years after.

    Not only were Linux users able to play the game on their systems mere months after the release of the commercial Windows version, they could play it with no loss of graphical fidelity. At a time when Linux was dismissed even more than it is today as just being a software toy or something only meant for servers, being able to play Doom 3 was a significant achievement which helped pave the way for the Linux gaming scene as we know it today.

  • Parkitect alpha 19 is out with new rides, new scenario options and plenty more
  • THQ Nordic is bringing Sphinx and the Cursed Mummy to Linux

    Sphinx and the Cursed Mummy, a game originally released back in 2003 is being revamped by THQ Nordic and it will include a Linux release.

  • The Fallout-inspired 'ATOM RPG' will launch on into Early Access next month with Linux support

    ATOM RPG [Steam, Official Site] is a Fallout-inspired post-apocalypse that was funded by Kickstarter and it's heading to Early Access next month. The plan is to release it on November 28th, with their current plan to remain in Early Access for five or six months.

  • Darkest Dungeon gets new character class in DLC
  • Intrinsic Continues Advancing As An Open-Source, Graphically-Rich Vulkan Game Engine

    Intrinsic is one of the best looking open-source Vulkan game engines we have seen to date.

    Intrinsic has supported Vulkan since last year when it was open-sourced. We covered it one year ago nearly to the day: Intrinsic Is A Promising, Open-Source, Cross-Platform Vulkan Game Engine.

SCO and the Linux Foundation

Filed under
Linux
  • SCO, the Not-Walking Dead, Returns

    SCO. There’s a name I’ll bet you thought you’d never hear again. Guess what? It’s back.

    Wasn’t there a Bond film called “Live to Die Another Day.” Even if there wasn’t, that applies here.

    When last we talked about SCO, in March, 2016, we told you this might happen, although Judge David Nuffer had all but put a bullet through the already dead and bankrupt company’s brain (there’s an oxymoron if ever I wrote one) on February 29, 2016. But exactly a month after the judge’s ruling, the company had somehow managed to scrape together enough spare change to pay the filing fee for an appeal. Today, the 10th US Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that that the appeal could go on, on a claim of misappropriation, but upheld Judge Nuffer’s other two orders.

  • AT&T announces Acumos, an open-source platform for sharing and reusing AI apps
  • AT&T is working on an open-sourced AI project with Linux Foundation

    The nonprofit Linux Foundation has announced that is working on an open source AI project, and AT&T is one of the founding organizations. Called the Acumos Project, its goal, like many open source platforms, is to enable a free exchange of ideas and machine learning solutions using an artificial intelligence framework -- and eventually become a marketplace for AI apps and services.

    The Acumos Project aims to provide tools for casual users, not data scientists, and will focus first on making apps and microservices. While The Linux Foundation's announcement was light on details, it noted that it will sustain the Acumos Project for some time and AT&T and other founder Tech Mahindra will contribute code.

  • Acumos: The Linux Foundation’s New Open Source Project Brings AI’s Power To Any Developer

More in Tux Machines

Programming/Development: C++, Go, Mozilla/Firefox and Python

  • Deliverable 1 : [✓]
    Seems okay, far better than the initial results. Although I should say, I deviated from what I thought I would need to write. First I assumed that I don’t have to write another boost::graph wrapper for KisPaintDevice, but I had to. That was one heck of an experience. In one of the last few posts, I ranted on Dmitry’s interpretation of the Graph, turns out we were on the same page but I understood his explanation the wrong way. I should put more attention to details from now on I guess. All the pixels are connected to each other, but they only have an edge between them if they are adjacent. If in center, the out degree would be 8, if in corners, 3 and if in edges, 5. There are some other cases too, but I will leave them for the moment. While writing the wrapper, I also got to know some of the cool features and techniques of C++, which I will be writing posts on as soon as I get some time, concepts, traits, avoiding virtual functions and what not. It is commendable that how boost approaches boost::astar_search, there is not a single virtual function, you don’t have to inherit anything (you can though for safety), just templates and traits, you are done.
  • Go Creeping In
    I’ve seen the inside of the Google and Amazon tech stacks. There are common threads that run through them and also, I bet, through most BigTechCos. Here and there down the stack is a lot of C++ and vestigial remnants from earlier days, Perl or PHP or whatever. Out in front of humans, of course, JS. But in between, there are oceans and oceans of Java; to a remarkable degree, it runs the Internet. Except for, here and there, you find a small but steadily increasing proportion of Go.
  • Stand by for FPR14 SPR1 chemspill
    Mozilla has shipped a fix for MFSA2019-18 in Firefox 67.0.3 and 60.7.1. This exploit has been detected in the wild, and while my analysis indicates it would require a PowerPC-specific attack to be exploitable in official TenFourFox builds (the Intel versions may be directly exploited, however), it could probably cause drive-by crashes and we should therefore ship an urgent fix as well. The chemspill is currently undergoing confidence tests and I'm shooting to release builds before the weekend. For builders, the only change in FPR14 SPR1 is the patch for bug 1544386, which I will be pushing to the repo just as soon as I have confirmed the fix causes no regressions.
  • PyPI Now Supports Two-Factor Login via WebAuthn
  • Understanding Python assignment
  • How to Publish Your Own Python Package to PyPI
  • PyCoder’s Weekly: Issue #373 (June 18, 2019)
  • EuroPython 2019: Community Discounts
  • EuroPython 2019: Inviting European Python Conference Organizers

today's howtos

All Linux, all the time: Supercomputers Top 500

Starting at the top, two IBM-built supercomputers, Summit and Sierra, at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Tennessee and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in California, respectively to the bottom -- a Lenovo Xeon-powered box in China -- all of them run Linux. Linux supports more hardware architectures than any other operating system. In supercomputers, it supports both clusters, such as Summit and Sierra, the most common architecture, and Massively Parallel Processing (MPP), which is used by the number three computer Sunway TaihuLight. When it comes to high-performance computing (HPC), Intel dominates the TOP500 by providing processing power to 95.6% of all systems included on the list. That said, IBM's POWER powers the fastest supercomputers. One supercomputer works its high-speed magic with Arm processors: Sandia Labs' Astra, an HPE design, which uses over 130-thousand Cavium ThunderX2 cores. And, what do all these processors run? Linux, of course. . 133 systems of the Top 500 supercomputers are using either accelerator or co-processor setups. Of these most are using Nvidia GPUs. And, once more, it's Linux conducting the hardware in a symphony of speed. Read more

Red Hat and SUSE Leftovers

  • Are DevOps certifications valuable? 10 pros and cons
  • Kubernetes 1.15: Enabling the Workloads
    The last mile for any enterprise IT system is the application. In order to enable those applications to function properly, an entire ecosystem of services, APIs, databases and edge servers must exist. As Carl Sagan once said, “If you wish to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first invent the universe.” To create that IT universe, however, we must have control over its elements. In the Kubernetes universe, the individual solar systems and planets are now Operators, and the fundamental laws of that universe have solidified to the point where civilizations can grow and take root. Discarding the metaphor, we can see this in the introduction of Object Count Quota Support For Custom Resources. In English, this enables administrators to count and limit the number of Kubernetes resources across the broader ecosystem in a given cluster. This means services like Knative, Istio, and even Operators like the CrunchyData PostgreSQL Operator, the MongoDB Operator or the Redis Operator can be controlled via quota using the same mechanisms that standard Kubernetes resources have enjoyed for many releases. That’s great for developers, who can now be limited by certain expectations. It would not benefit the cluster for a bad bit of code to create 30 new PostgreSQL clusters because someone forgot to add a “;” at the end of a line. Call them “guardrails” that protect against unbounded object growth in your etcd database.
  • Red Hat named HPE’s Partner of the Year at HPE Discover 2019
    For more than 19 years, Red Hat has collaborated with HPE to develop, deliver and support trusted solutions that can create value and fuel transformation for customers. Our work together has grown over these nearly two decades and our solutions now include Linux, containers and telecommunications technologies, to name just a few. As a testament to our collaboration, HPE has named Red Hat the Technology Partner of the Year 2019 for Hybrid Cloud Solutions.
  • Demystifying Containers – Part II: Container Runtimes
    This series of blog posts and corresponding talks aims to provide you with a pragmatic view on containers from a historic perspective. Together we will discover modern cloud architectures layer by layer, which means we will start at the Linux Kernel level and end up at writing our own secure cloud native applications. Simple examples paired with the historic background will guide you from the beginning with a minimal Linux environment up to crafting secure containers, which fit perfectly into todays’ and futures’ orchestration world. In the end it should be much easier to understand how features within the Linux kernel, container tools, runtimes, software defined networks and orchestration software like Kubernetes are designed and how they work under the hood.
  • Edge > Core > Cloud: Transform the Way You Want
    For more than 25 years, SUSE has been very successful in delivering enterprise-grade Linux to our customers. And as IT infrastructure has shifted and evolved, so have we. For instance, we enabled and supported the move to software-defined data centers as virtualization and containerization technologies became more prevalent and data growth demanded a new approach.
  • SUSE OpenStack Cloud Technology Preview Takes Flight
    We are pleased to announce that as of today we are making a technology preview of a containerized version of SUSE OpenStack Cloud available that will demonstrate a future direction for our product. The lifecycle management for this technology preview is based on an upstream OpenStack project called Airship, which SUSE has been using and contributing to for some time. This follows our open / open policy of upstream first and community involvement.