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December 2017

Making Vim Even More Awesome With These Cool Features

Filed under
Linux

​Vim is quite an integral part of Every Linux Distribution and the most useful tool (of course after the terminal) for Linux Users. At least, this theory holds for me. People might argue that for programming, Vim might not be a good choice as there are different IDEs or other sophisticated text editors like Sublime Text 3, Atom etc. which make the programming job pretty easier.

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Cloak's Transaction System Enigma is Open Source - A Milestone for Privacy

Filed under
OSS

ENIGMA, the in-house payment system is open source as of 31st December 2017. Anyone can now take advantage of CloakCoin's Transaction System.

At the heart of CloakCoin is ENIGMA, protecting you from access by third parties, such as hackers, official bodies or any unwanted parties. The blockchain payment system encrypts the transactions of users and prevents transaction tracking while providing secure transactions with a maximum processing time of 60 seconds.

Thus, CloakCoin's ENIGMA ensures full privacy combined with speed.

Many advantages that are hard to find at other cryptos and which are now easily accessible to you, the end user.

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Docker, Inc is Dead

Filed under
Server

To say that Docker had a very rough 2017 is an understatement. Aside from Uber, I can’t think of a more utilized, hyped, and well funded Silicon Valley startup (still in operation) fumbling as bad as Docker did in 2017. People will look back on 2017 as the year Docker, a great piece of software, was completely ruined by bad business practices leading to its end in 2018. This is an outside facing retrospective on how and where Docker went wrong and how Docker’s efforts to fix it are far too little way too late.

[...]

Docker’s doom has been accelerated by the rise of Kubernetes. Docker did itself no favors in its handling of Kubernetes, the open source community’s darling container orchestrator. Docker’s competing product, Docker Swarm, was the only container orchestrator in Docker’s mind. This decision was made despite Kubernetes preferring Docker containers at first. Off the record, Docker Captains confirmed early in 2017 that Kubernetes discussions in articles, at meetups, and at conferences was frowned upon by Docker.

Through dockercon17 in Austin this Kubernetes-less mantra held. Then, rather abruptly, at dockercon EU 17 Docker decided to go all in on Kubernetes. The sudden change was an obvious admission to Kubernetes’ rise and impending dominance. This is only exacerbated by the fact that Docker sponsored and had a booth at KubeCon + CloudNativeCon North America 2017.

[...]

The real problem with Docker is a lack of coherent leadership. There appears to have been a strategic focus around a singular person in the organization. This individual has been pushed further and further away from the core of the company but still remains. The company has reorganized and has shifted its focus to the enterprise. This shift makes sense for Docker’s investors (the company does have a fiduciary responsibility after all). But, this shift is going to reduce the brand’s cool factor that fueled its wild success. It is said that, “Great civilizations are not murdered. They commit suicide.” Docker has done just that.

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Programming: LLVM Clang, Debian Tools, OpenCV

Filed under
Development
  • LLVM Clang Gets Support For Configuration Files

    Ahead of next week's LLVM 6.0 feature freeze / code branching, the Clang C/C++ compiler front-end has picked up support for the concept of configuration files.

    Clang configuration files basically come down to a file that can store multiple parameters to pass to Clang, just as you would otherwise do via the command-line but can now be stored into a text file. The purpose of these Clang configuration files is maninly for cross-compiler arguments or other use-cases where you may otherwise be passing a ton of repeated arguments to Clang.

  • pam-krb5 4.8

    This is the default Kerberos PAM module for Debian and Ubuntu systems, and supports both MIT Kerberos and Heimdal. I'm not sure how many people still use straight Kerberos PAM modules these days, with sssd taking off, but I'm still maintaining it.

    This release fixes a somewhat obscure bug: if you configure the module to do expired password changes properly, it checks to see that the expired credentials can still get kadmin/changepw credentials to do the password change. However, it was setting credential options improperly on that call, which could cause it to spuriously fail if, say, krb5.conf is configured to request proxiable credentials but kadmin/changepw doesn't support proxiable credentials. Thanks to Florian Best for the excellent bug report.

  • Animated line drawings with OpenCV

    OpenCV is a pretty versatile C++ computer vision library. Because I use it every day it has also become my go-to tool for creating simple animations at pixel level, for fun, and saving them as video files. This is not one of its core functions but happens to be possible using its GUI drawing tools.

  • rra-c-util 7.0

    This is my collection of utility libraries and support code for (mostly) C software.

    The major version bump is due a backwards-incompatible change: dropping the SA_LEN macro from portable/macros.h, including all the Autoconf machinery to probe for it. This macro came from INN's old portability code when porting to IPv6, but INN turned out to not really need it and it's never caught on. It was causing some warnings with GCC 7 that would otherwise have been hard to fix, so it was time for it to go.

  • C TAP Harness 4.2

    The functional change in this release of my test framework for C programs is the addition of a new is_blob test function. This is equivalent to ok(memcmp(...)) but it reports where the two memory regions differ as a diagnostic.

GNOME: Glade 3.21.0 and GNOME.Asia

Filed under
GNOME
  • Glade 3.21.0 Released!

    Glade 3.21.0 is the first development release in the 3.21 series

    It has a new modern UI for an improved, more streamline GUI design
    workflow.

  • Glade 3.21 Released For Whipping Up GTK3 Interfaces

    Glade 3.21 was released today as the latest development release of this tool for quickly designing GTK3/GNOME user-interfaces.

  • GNOME.Asia and Engagmeent update

    GNOME.Asia was an amazing event and I wanted to reach out to the organizers and thank them for the wonderful reception that I received while I was there. The trip to Chongqing was mostly uneventful other than the fact every Chinese official was gunning for my battery brick when going through airport security. After a long layover in Beijing, I was landed in Chongqing and met up with Mathias Clasen and proceeded to head to the hotel.

Android Apps on Chrome OS, postmarketOS Coming Along

Filed under
Android
  • Chromebooks Will Soon Support Parallel Android Apps with the Chrome OS 64 Update

    Google is reportedly bringing support for running multiple Android apps simultaneously on supported Chromebook models via an upcoming update of their Chrome OS Linux-based operating system.

    According to the ChromeUnboxed website, it would appear that the upcoming Chrome OS 64 operating system carries a new feature called "Android Parallel Tasks," which looks to let users run Android apps in the background on Chromebooks that support Google Play Store and Android apps.

    At the moment, Chrome OS pauses Android apps when the focus is no longer on them, which means that it's not possible to run multiple Android apps at the same time. The latest stable release of Chrome OS is version 63 and was released on December 15, a day after Google promoted Chrome OS 64 to the Beta channel.

  • 219 days of postmarketOS

    Most people around us have accepted that it is necessary to buy a new phone every other year. As a smartphone progresses through its own life cycle, manufacturer support for new features become rare, eventually stopping, and the device gets slower and slower. Even worse, after this period, the devices don't get security updates anymore. This means that in many cases the bored IT student next door is able to look up on the Internet how to turn your phone into a surveillance device. Unfortunately the only way to continue to receive security updates after this point is to purchase a new device. In lieu of any alternatives today, you really should purchase a new device to stay current with security updates.

    We want to have another option: postmarketOS is a Linux distribution based on (lightning fast) Alpine that aims for a ten year life-cycle. Instead of having binaries and forked source code for every device, we unify them as much as possible. That allows us to provide updates for all devices at once. The project is still in an early stage (no, you still can't make calls with it.) But it would be a mistake to wait for phone call functionality without informing you about all the breakthroughs we have had. Read on for the exciting changes since day one hundred!

LinuxConsole 2018 Gaming Operating System Released with TORCS and SuperTuxKart

Filed under
Linux
Gaming

Designed as a modern, gaming, and educational GNU/Linux distribution that can be easily installed on 32-bit or 64-bit computers and comes pre-installed with ready-to-use software and games, LinuxConsole 2018 brings up-to-date components like Linux kernel 4.9.66 LTS (64-bit) and Linux kernel 4.1.48 LTS (32-bit).

MATE 1.18 is used as default desktop environment in LinuxConsole 2018, which makes it possible to manage Bluetooth devices and simplifies the configuration of wireless networks. It also comes with the latest Mozilla Firefox 57 Quantum web browser and supports Arabic locale.

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Gentoo-Based Calculate Linux 17.12 New Year's Eve Release Adds SoftRaid Support

Filed under
Gentoo

Coming six months after version 17.6, Calculate Linux 17.12 introduces some new features and improvements like SoftRaid support, better automatic partitioning of drives, support for third-party overlays, better application task scheduling with the MuQSS kernel patch, as well as less memory load with the UKSM kernel patch.

Under the hood, Calculate Linux 17.12 is powered by the latest Linux 4.14 LTS (Long Term Support) kernel and X.Org Server 1.19.5 display server, uses a PAE binary kernel for 32-bit computes, updates GCC (GNU Compiler Collection) to version 6.4, optimizes all server kernel settings, and it launches Calculate Utilities server through D-Bus instead of running in the background, for better performance.

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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • OnMSFT.com – What we use [Ed: "On Microsoft" is actually... not on Microsoft. It's on GNU/Linux.]

    OnMSFT runs Ubuntu 18.04 and Nginx...

  • Linux 5.7 Staging Will Be ~28.7k Lines Of Code Lighter Thanks To Nuking WUSB + UWB

    With the Linux 5.7 kernel cycle in two months there is some "spring cleaning" within the staging area that is leading to almost twenty-nine thousand lines of code being removed thanks to removing a deprecated feature. Last year we reported on Linux deprecating Wireless USB and Ultra Wideband subsystems. That WUSB and UWB code was demoted after being orphaned without a code maintainer for years with Wireless USB really not being popular in an era of Bluetooth and WiFi advancements. With no one having expressed concern or stepping up to maintain the code since deprecating WUSB and UWB, the code is now set to be removed with Linux 5.7.

  • Everything you need to know about the ArcoLinux Tweak Tool

    Screenshot of the last version

  • Mozilla Reps in 2020 Berlin All Hands

    14 Reps were invited to participate in this year’s All Hands in Berlin. At the All-Hands Reps learned some easy German words (Innovationsprozess-swischenstands-schreihungsskizze), did some art (see here X artistic endeavor during a group activity), and learned about cultural differences in communication.

  • Waterfox: Firefox Fork With Legacy Add-ons Options

    In this week’s open source software highlight, we take a look at a Firefox-based browser that supports legacy extensions that Firefox no longer supports while potentially providing fast user experience. When it comes to web browsers, Google Chrome leads the market share. Mozilla Firefox is there still providing hopes for a mainstream web browser that respects your privacy. Firefox has improved a lot lately and one of the side-effects of the improvements is removal of add-ons. If your favorite add-on disappeared in last few months/years, you have a good new in the form of Witerfox.

  • Vulkan 1.2.133 Released With VK_KHR_shader_non_semantic_info

    It's been nearly one month since the release of Vulkan 1.2.132 and that came shortly after the big Vulkan 1.2 milestone, but out today is now Vulkan 1.2.133. Vulkan 1.2.133 has various clarifications to the documentation, adds a vendor ID for Codeplay, VK_EXT_shader_subgroup_vote / VK_EXT_shader_subgroup_ballot are deprecated, and other clarifications/corrections to the text.

  • Work on IoT Device Communication Standardization Begins

    Most people working with industrial automation equipment are familiar with OPC UA for machine and device communications. More recently, industry has been getting up to speed with MQTT and its complimentary role for industrial device communications. While OPC UA has long been an industry standard, work is now beginning on a broad standardization of MQTT communications via Sparkplug, the open source software specification that enables applications, sensors, devices or gateways to integrate data within an MQTT communications infrastructure. Sparkplug defines MQTT topics namespace, payload, and session state management. [...] This work will address the issue of MQTT ‘s undefined topics structure and data types—a key differentiator from OPC UA which “provides a framework for standard and custom datatypes, a defined (hierarchical) namespace and a definition for request/response style communication patterns,” as noted by Jen Reiman in ctron’s blog post about OPC UA implementation with the Eclipse Foundation’s Milo (an open source communication stack for developing OPC UA clients and servers). Founding members of the Sparkplug Working Group include Chevron, Canary Labs, Cirrus Link Solutions, HiveMQ, Inductive Automation, and ORing.

  • Google pulls 500 malicious Chrome extensions after researcher tip-off

    Google has abruptly pulled over 500 Chrome extensions from its Web Store that researchers discovered were stealing browsing data and executing click fraud and malvertising after installing themselves on the computers of millions of users. Depending on which way you look at it, that’s either a good result because they’re no longer free to infect users, or an example of how easy it is for malicious extensions to sneak on the Web Store and stay there for years without Google noticing.

  • Security updates for Monday

    Security updates have been issued by Debian (evince, postgresql-9.4, and thunderbird), Fedora (ksh and libxml2), openSUSE (hostapd and nextcloud), Red Hat (chromium-browser, firefox, flash-plugin, and ksh), and SUSE (firefox and thunderbird). 

  • Microsoft's Edge roadmap reveals history sync coming this summer, Linux support coming

    Recently, Microsoft updated its public roadmap for its still-new Edge browser, which is based on Chromium. There's quite a bit on there, from minor fixes to major things like support for Linux. Two specific things are new. The ability to navigate a PDF via a table of contents is now under review, and the tab preview feature from Edge Legacy is now in discussion. As 'in review' and 'in discussion' suggest, neither is a commitment to actually building out the features.

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  • Nintendo Is Likely to Suffer Global Switch Shortages From Virus
                     
                       

    Limited component supply coming out of China is affecting output at a Nintendo assembly partner’s factory in Vietnam, which the gaming giant primarily uses to build consoles for the U.S., said the people, asking not to be named because the details are private. A shortage of components this month would affect Switch units scheduled for arrival in April, after existing inventory and current shipments of the console have sold through.

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  • Roboflow: Popular autonomous vehicle data set contains critical flaws

    A machine learning model’s performance is only as good as the quality of the data set on which it’s trained, and in the domain of self-driving vehicles, it’s critical this performance isn’t adversely impacted by errors. A troubling report from computer vision startup Roboflow alleges that exactly this scenario occurred — according to founder Brad Dwyer, crucial bits of data were omitted from a corpus used to train self-driving car models. Dwyer writes that Udacity Dataset 2, which contains 15,000 images captured while driving in Mountain View and neighboring cities during daylight, has omissions. Thousands of unlabeled vehicles, hundreds of unlabeled pedestrians, and dozens of unlabeled cyclists are present in roughly 5,000 of the samples, or 33% (217 lack any annotations at all but actually contain cars, trucks, street lights, or pedestrians). Worse are the instances of phantom annotations and duplicated bounding boxes (where “bounding box” refers to objects of interest), in addition to “drastically” oversized bounding boxes.

  • The Open Wearables Initiative expands founding team; begins soliciting algorithms and datasets for wearable and connected health technologies

    Shimmer Research, a global leader in wearable technology for research applications, today announced that the Open Wearables Initiative (OWEAR) is now actively soliciting open source software and datasets from wearable sensors and other connected health technologies at http://www.owear.org. OWEAR is a collaboration designed to promote the effective use of high-quality, sensor-generated measures of health in clinical research through the open sharing and benchmarking of algorithms and datasets. OWEAR has also expanded its Working Group to include executives from four major global pharmaceutical companies, a major clinical research organization (CRO), Sage Bionetworks and the Digital Medicine Society (DiMe).

Events: LibreOffice at FOSDEM, GTK Hackfest in Brussels and Kiwi TCMS in Sofia, Singapore, Kiev & Moscow

Debian and Ubuntu: SnowCamp 2020, Ben Armstrong 'Un-retires', Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter

  • SnowCamp 2020

    This is just a late reminder that there are still some seats available for SnowCamp, taking place at the end of this week and during the whole weekend somewhere in the Italian mountains. I believe it will be a really nice opportunity to hack on Debian things and thus I'd hope that there won't be empty seats, though atm this is the case.

  • Ben Armstrong: Introducing Dronefly, a Discord bot for naturalists

    In the past few years, since first leaving Debian as a free software developer in 2016, I’ve taken up some new hobbies, or more accurately, renewed my interest in some old ones. During that hiatus, I also quietly un-retired from Debian, anticipating there would be some way to contribute to the project in these new areas of interest. That’s still an idea looking for the right opportunity to present itself, not to mention the available time to get involved again. With age comes an increasing clamor of complaints from your body when you have a sedentary job in front of a screen, and hobbies that rarely take you away from it. You can’t just plunk down in front of a screen and do computer stuff non-stop & just bounce back again at the start of each new day. So in the past several years, getting outside more started to improve my well-being and address those complaints. That revived an old interest in me: nature photography. That, in turn, landed me at iNaturalist, re-ignited my childhood love of learning about the natural world, & hooked me on a regular habit of making observations & uploading them to iNat ever since. Second, back in the late nineties, I wrote a little library loans renewal reminder project in Python. Python was a pleasure to work with, but that project never took off and soon was forgotten. Now once again, decades later, Python is a delight to be writing in, with its focus on writing readable code & backed by a strong culture of education.

  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 618

    Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue 618 for the week of February 9 – 15, 2020.

Fedora and Red Hat: Test Day This Thursday, Report on State of Enterprise Open Source 2020 and More

  • Fedora 32 Gnome 3.36 Test Day 2020-02-20

    Thursday, 2020-02-20 is the Fedora 32 Gnome Test Day! As part of changes Gnome 3.36 in Fedora 32, we need your help to test if everything runs smoothly!

  • The State of Enterprise Open Source 2020: Enterprise open source use rises, proprietary software declines

    Last year we set out to determine how IT leaders think about open source, why they choose it and what they intend to do with it in the future. The result was The 2019 State of Enterprise Open Source: A Red Hat Report, and the findings were clear and confirmed what we see happening in the industry. Enterprise open source has become a default choice of IT departments around the world and organizations are using open source in categories that have historically been more associated with proprietary technology. Headed into the second year of the survey, we had a new directive in mind. We wanted to dive deeper into how IT leaders’ intentions and usage have changed. We surveyed 950 IT leaders in four regions. Respondents had to have some familiarity with enterprise open source and have at least 1% Linux installed at their organization. Respondents were not necessarily Red Hat customers and were unaware that Red Hat was the sponsor of this survey. This allowed us to get a more honest and broad view of the true state of enterprise open source.

  • Manage application programming interfaces to drive new revenue for service providers

    Telecommunications service providers have valuable assets that can be exposed, secured, and monetized via API-centric agile integration. They can derive additional value from new assets, developed internally or through partners and third parties and integrated in a similar way with OSS and BSS systems. Service providers can open new revenue paths if they enhance the value they deliver to customers and to their partner- and developer-ecosystems. APIs can help them accomplish this goal. Services that providers can potentially offer with APIs include direct carrier billing, mobile health services, augmented reality, geofencing, IoT applications, and more. Mobile connectivity, for example, is key to powering IoT applications and devices, giving service providers an inside track to provide APIs to access network information for IoT services. In mobile health, APIs can serve as the link between the customer and healthcare partners through the user’s smartphone. Embracing this API-centric approach, service providers can realize increased agility by treating OSS/BSS building blocks as components that can be reused again and again. They may also innovate faster by giving partners controlled access to data and services, expand their ecosystem by improving partner and third-party collaboration, and generate more revenue through new direct and indirect channels.