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December 2017

Making Vim Even More Awesome With These Cool Features

Filed under
Linux

​Vim is quite an integral part of Every Linux Distribution and the most useful tool (of course after the terminal) for Linux Users. At least, this theory holds for me. People might argue that for programming, Vim might not be a good choice as there are different IDEs or other sophisticated text editors like Sublime Text 3, Atom etc. which make the programming job pretty easier.

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Cloak's Transaction System Enigma is Open Source - A Milestone for Privacy

Filed under
OSS

ENIGMA, the in-house payment system is open source as of 31st December 2017. Anyone can now take advantage of CloakCoin's Transaction System.

At the heart of CloakCoin is ENIGMA, protecting you from access by third parties, such as hackers, official bodies or any unwanted parties. The blockchain payment system encrypts the transactions of users and prevents transaction tracking while providing secure transactions with a maximum processing time of 60 seconds.

Thus, CloakCoin's ENIGMA ensures full privacy combined with speed.

Many advantages that are hard to find at other cryptos and which are now easily accessible to you, the end user.

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Docker, Inc is Dead

Filed under
Server

To say that Docker had a very rough 2017 is an understatement. Aside from Uber, I can’t think of a more utilized, hyped, and well funded Silicon Valley startup (still in operation) fumbling as bad as Docker did in 2017. People will look back on 2017 as the year Docker, a great piece of software, was completely ruined by bad business practices leading to its end in 2018. This is an outside facing retrospective on how and where Docker went wrong and how Docker’s efforts to fix it are far too little way too late.

[...]

Docker’s doom has been accelerated by the rise of Kubernetes. Docker did itself no favors in its handling of Kubernetes, the open source community’s darling container orchestrator. Docker’s competing product, Docker Swarm, was the only container orchestrator in Docker’s mind. This decision was made despite Kubernetes preferring Docker containers at first. Off the record, Docker Captains confirmed early in 2017 that Kubernetes discussions in articles, at meetups, and at conferences was frowned upon by Docker.

Through dockercon17 in Austin this Kubernetes-less mantra held. Then, rather abruptly, at dockercon EU 17 Docker decided to go all in on Kubernetes. The sudden change was an obvious admission to Kubernetes’ rise and impending dominance. This is only exacerbated by the fact that Docker sponsored and had a booth at KubeCon + CloudNativeCon North America 2017.

[...]

The real problem with Docker is a lack of coherent leadership. There appears to have been a strategic focus around a singular person in the organization. This individual has been pushed further and further away from the core of the company but still remains. The company has reorganized and has shifted its focus to the enterprise. This shift makes sense for Docker’s investors (the company does have a fiduciary responsibility after all). But, this shift is going to reduce the brand’s cool factor that fueled its wild success. It is said that, “Great civilizations are not murdered. They commit suicide.” Docker has done just that.

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Programming: LLVM Clang, Debian Tools, OpenCV

Filed under
Development
  • LLVM Clang Gets Support For Configuration Files

    Ahead of next week's LLVM 6.0 feature freeze / code branching, the Clang C/C++ compiler front-end has picked up support for the concept of configuration files.

    Clang configuration files basically come down to a file that can store multiple parameters to pass to Clang, just as you would otherwise do via the command-line but can now be stored into a text file. The purpose of these Clang configuration files is maninly for cross-compiler arguments or other use-cases where you may otherwise be passing a ton of repeated arguments to Clang.

  • pam-krb5 4.8

    This is the default Kerberos PAM module for Debian and Ubuntu systems, and supports both MIT Kerberos and Heimdal. I'm not sure how many people still use straight Kerberos PAM modules these days, with sssd taking off, but I'm still maintaining it.

    This release fixes a somewhat obscure bug: if you configure the module to do expired password changes properly, it checks to see that the expired credentials can still get kadmin/changepw credentials to do the password change. However, it was setting credential options improperly on that call, which could cause it to spuriously fail if, say, krb5.conf is configured to request proxiable credentials but kadmin/changepw doesn't support proxiable credentials. Thanks to Florian Best for the excellent bug report.

  • Animated line drawings with OpenCV

    OpenCV is a pretty versatile C++ computer vision library. Because I use it every day it has also become my go-to tool for creating simple animations at pixel level, for fun, and saving them as video files. This is not one of its core functions but happens to be possible using its GUI drawing tools.

  • rra-c-util 7.0

    This is my collection of utility libraries and support code for (mostly) C software.

    The major version bump is due a backwards-incompatible change: dropping the SA_LEN macro from portable/macros.h, including all the Autoconf machinery to probe for it. This macro came from INN's old portability code when porting to IPv6, but INN turned out to not really need it and it's never caught on. It was causing some warnings with GCC 7 that would otherwise have been hard to fix, so it was time for it to go.

  • C TAP Harness 4.2

    The functional change in this release of my test framework for C programs is the addition of a new is_blob test function. This is equivalent to ok(memcmp(...)) but it reports where the two memory regions differ as a diagnostic.

GNOME: Glade 3.21.0 and GNOME.Asia

Filed under
GNOME
  • Glade 3.21.0 Released!

    Glade 3.21.0 is the first development release in the 3.21 series

    It has a new modern UI for an improved, more streamline GUI design
    workflow.

  • Glade 3.21 Released For Whipping Up GTK3 Interfaces

    Glade 3.21 was released today as the latest development release of this tool for quickly designing GTK3/GNOME user-interfaces.

  • GNOME.Asia and Engagmeent update

    GNOME.Asia was an amazing event and I wanted to reach out to the organizers and thank them for the wonderful reception that I received while I was there. The trip to Chongqing was mostly uneventful other than the fact every Chinese official was gunning for my battery brick when going through airport security. After a long layover in Beijing, I was landed in Chongqing and met up with Mathias Clasen and proceeded to head to the hotel.

Android Apps on Chrome OS, postmarketOS Coming Along

Filed under
Android
  • Chromebooks Will Soon Support Parallel Android Apps with the Chrome OS 64 Update

    Google is reportedly bringing support for running multiple Android apps simultaneously on supported Chromebook models via an upcoming update of their Chrome OS Linux-based operating system.

    According to the ChromeUnboxed website, it would appear that the upcoming Chrome OS 64 operating system carries a new feature called "Android Parallel Tasks," which looks to let users run Android apps in the background on Chromebooks that support Google Play Store and Android apps.

    At the moment, Chrome OS pauses Android apps when the focus is no longer on them, which means that it's not possible to run multiple Android apps at the same time. The latest stable release of Chrome OS is version 63 and was released on December 15, a day after Google promoted Chrome OS 64 to the Beta channel.

  • 219 days of postmarketOS

    Most people around us have accepted that it is necessary to buy a new phone every other year. As a smartphone progresses through its own life cycle, manufacturer support for new features become rare, eventually stopping, and the device gets slower and slower. Even worse, after this period, the devices don't get security updates anymore. This means that in many cases the bored IT student next door is able to look up on the Internet how to turn your phone into a surveillance device. Unfortunately the only way to continue to receive security updates after this point is to purchase a new device. In lieu of any alternatives today, you really should purchase a new device to stay current with security updates.

    We want to have another option: postmarketOS is a Linux distribution based on (lightning fast) Alpine that aims for a ten year life-cycle. Instead of having binaries and forked source code for every device, we unify them as much as possible. That allows us to provide updates for all devices at once. The project is still in an early stage (no, you still can't make calls with it.) But it would be a mistake to wait for phone call functionality without informing you about all the breakthroughs we have had. Read on for the exciting changes since day one hundred!

LinuxConsole 2018 Gaming Operating System Released with TORCS and SuperTuxKart

Filed under
Linux
Gaming

Designed as a modern, gaming, and educational GNU/Linux distribution that can be easily installed on 32-bit or 64-bit computers and comes pre-installed with ready-to-use software and games, LinuxConsole 2018 brings up-to-date components like Linux kernel 4.9.66 LTS (64-bit) and Linux kernel 4.1.48 LTS (32-bit).

MATE 1.18 is used as default desktop environment in LinuxConsole 2018, which makes it possible to manage Bluetooth devices and simplifies the configuration of wireless networks. It also comes with the latest Mozilla Firefox 57 Quantum web browser and supports Arabic locale.

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Gentoo-Based Calculate Linux 17.12 New Year's Eve Release Adds SoftRaid Support

Filed under
Gentoo

Coming six months after version 17.6, Calculate Linux 17.12 introduces some new features and improvements like SoftRaid support, better automatic partitioning of drives, support for third-party overlays, better application task scheduling with the MuQSS kernel patch, as well as less memory load with the UKSM kernel patch.

Under the hood, Calculate Linux 17.12 is powered by the latest Linux 4.14 LTS (Long Term Support) kernel and X.Org Server 1.19.5 display server, uses a PAE binary kernel for 32-bit computes, updates GCC (GNU Compiler Collection) to version 6.4, optimizes all server kernel settings, and it launches Calculate Utilities server through D-Bus instead of running in the background, for better performance.

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More in Tux Machines

Ubuntu Studio 18.10 Wallpaper Contest Winners

We would like to thank everyone who participated in our wallpaper contest for Ubuntu Studio 18.10! With 487 votes, the top 5 submissions were chosen. The winners can be found at this link. Additionally, we’d like to announce the new default wallpaper for 18.10, designed by Ubuntu Studio developer Eylul Dogruel, and is pictured to the right. Read more

Red Hat Leftovers

Folding@Home Performance Is Looking Good On The GeForce RTX 2080 Ti

Yesterday I published a number of CUDA and OpenCL benchmarks for the NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2080 Ti graphics card that happened to show the very strong GPU compote potential for this new Turing GPU. Another workload with promising potential for this powerful but pricey graphics card is Folding@Home. Folding@Home was accidentally left out of yesterday's RTX 2080 Ti CUDA/OpenCL comparison with simply forgetting to add the FAHBench test profile to the run queue. But as there is often interest in seeing the FAHBench performance on new GPUs by at least a few of the premium enablers, I ran some extra tests just looking at the Folding@Home performance and here are those results today. Read more

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