Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

January 2018

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Open Source Security Podcast: Episode 80 - GPS tracking and jamming
  • How to add a repository on your Linux machine
  • Modify SVG using GSVGtk: First Repor

    GSVGtk is a library to provide GTK+ widgets you can use to access SVG files. It is powered by GSVG, in a way it can access each shape and its properties using a GObject API based on W3C SVG 1.1 specification.

    Currently, GSVGtk uses Clutter to encapsulate SVG shapes, render them inside Clutter Actors, through librsvg, and maps events to source SVG in order to eventually modify original definitions, like its position.

    In the following video, you can see GSVGtk’s Container based on Clutter, loading an SVG file, take some shapes from it to show on the scene.

  • logo.png for default avatar for GitLab repos

    I added a logo.png to GNOME Tweaks at GNOME and it automatically showed up in Salsa when I imported the new version.

  • What’s New in Peppermint OS 8 Respin

    Peppermint OS 8 respin is the latest release of Peppermint OS Linux Distribution. This release based on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus), powered by linux kernel 4.10 series, using LXDE desktop environment with new “Pepirus” xfwm4, GTK+ and icon themes. Also, brings 64 bit and 32 bit installation images. The 64 bit release provides complete support for UEFI systems and secure boot.

  • Imagine the world's biggest Kanban / Scrumboard

    Imagine a Kanban board that could aggregate issues from multiple backends, including your CalDAV task list, Bugzilla systems (Fedora, Mozilla, GNOME communities), Github issue lists and the Debian Bug Tracking System, visualize them together and coordinate your upstream fixes and packaging fixes in a single sprint.

    [...]

    If you'd like to see this or any of the other proposed projects go ahead, you don't need to be a Debian Developer to suggest ideas, refer a student or be a co-mentor. Many of our projects have relevance in multiple communities. Feel free to get in touch with us through the debian-outreach mailing list.

The Linux Foundation is Growing

Filed under
Linux
  • Linux Foundation fights fragmentation with network umbrella

    Open source platforms are becoming more and more fundamental to the new telecoms network architecture, raising exciting prospects for a more democratic ecosystem and rapid innovation. But open source also comes with the risk of fragmentation, which has already been seen in industry splits over different approaches to management and orchestration (MANO) in virtualized networks. A large number of open projects has emerged in the areas of virtualization, software-defined networking (SDN), MANO and even telecoms hardware initiatives like Facebook’s OpenCellular.

  • The Linux Foundation Announces 30 New Silver Members

    The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, announced the addition of 30 Silver members. Linux Foundation members help support development of the greatest shared technology resources in history, while accelerating their own innovation through open source leadership and participation.

Red Hat and Fedora Leftovers

Server: Microservices, Replika, STORK, OpenStack

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • India's RJio Plots Open Source Disruption

    Owned by Indian billionaire Mukesh Ambani, the telco believes that it is high time India developed products and services tailored specifically to the Indian market. "If you observe, a lot of effort has been put into the IT space [in India], but what has not happened is a focused effort [for innovation] in the telecom space," says Matthew Oommen, RJio's president of networks, global strategy and service development, on the sidelines of India's recent Digital Open Summit.

  • Open Source Initiative Turns 20

    The Open Source Initiative (OSI) will celebrate its 20th anniversary on Friday, Feb. 2, and the global non-profit organization dedicated to raising awareness and adoption of open source software is gonna par-tay. By which I mean, the OSI has scheduled activities around the world this year to commemorate the event. (I'm hoping there will be snacks.)

  • Swatantra17

    Last month Thiruvananthapuram witnessed one of the biggest Free and Open Source Software conference called Swatantra17. Swatantra is a flagship triennial ( actually used to be triennial, but from now on organizers decided to conduct in every 2 years.) FOSS conference from ICFOSS. This year there were more than 30 speakers from all around the world. The event held from 20-21 December at Mascot hotel, Thiruvananthapuram. I was one of the community volunteer for the event and was excited from the day it announced Smile .

  • DO or UNDO - there is no VACUUM

    To put this another way, it is in general true that PostgreSQL’s VACUUM implementation has gotten progressively better at reclaiming space occupied by dead tuples more quickly and with less expenditure of effort. And that’s really good, because the faster you reclaim space, the less new space you end up allocating, which keeps tables small and performance high. However, the examples above show that VACUUM isn’t the whole problem. In these examples, even if VACUUM ran at the earliest instant when it could reclaim the space occupied by dead tuples and ran infinitely fast, the table would still become bloated. In the case where the bloat is caused by many short queries run while one long-running transaction remains open, we could, with smarter snapshot management, limit the worst-case bloat to approximately a factor of two -- that is, we’d keep the version of the tuple visible to the old snapshot and the current version, and discard the intermediate versions, a trick PostgreSQL currently can’t manage. However, even a factor of two is a lot, and what if there are multiple distinct open snapshots?  Further, in the case where the bloat is created by a SQL statement that induces scattered updates throughout the table, no improvement to VACUUM can possibly help. By the time that SQL statement finishes, the damage is already done.

  • Scratch group projects – 2018

    Once again, it’s time for this year’s Scratch projects from my grade 10 students. Up next is python, but their final projects are available at https://scratch.lesbg.com. Feel free to play them and rate them. This is a first attempt for students, so do please be gentle on the ratings.

  • Why Create a New Unix Shell?

FSF and GNU Debugger (GDB) 8.1

Filed under
GNU
  • Free Software Foundation was gifted 91 bitcoin

    The Free Software Foundation, has announced that it received its largest donation ever, 91.45 bitcoin from an anonymous entity called Pineapple Fund. The 91.45 bitcoin, at the time of payment, was roughly equal to $1 million. The Free Software Foundation is an organisation that promotes the concept of free software, which is defined by the ‘four essential freedoms’.

  • GDB 8.1 released!

    Release 8.1 of GDB, the GNU Debugger, is now available via anonymous FTP.  GDB is a source-level debugger for Ada, C, C++, Objective-C, Pascal and many other languages.  GDB can target (i.e., debug programs running on) more than a dozen different processor architectures, and GDB itself can run on most popular GNU/Linux, Unix and Microsoft Windows variants.

  • GDB 8.1 Debugger Brings Better Rust Support, Improved Python Scripting

    Version 8.1 of the GNU Debugger (GDB) is now available for developers.

    The GDB 8.1 debugger update brings Python scripting enhancements, improved Rust language support, breakpoints on C++ functions are now set on all scopes by default, a number of new commands have been added, the GDBserver has received a few enhancements, there is better auto-completion support for this debugger, and a variety of other improvements to help developers debug their code in a variety of languages.

  • GDB 8.1 released

    Version 8.1 of the GDB debugger is out. Changes include better support for the Rust language and various other improvements to make debugging easier; see the announcement and the news file for the full list.

Security: Updates, Google, Hacking Team, Microsoft-NSA, Django

Filed under
Security
  • Security updates for Wednesday
  • How Did Google Wipe Out 700,000 Malicious Android Apps From Play Store? Using Artificial Intelligence
  • Hacking Team Is Still Alive Thanks to a Mysterious Investor From Saudi Arabia

    The 2015 breach of spyware vendor Hacking Team seemed like it should have ended the company. Hacking Team was thoroughly owned, with its once-secret list of customers, internal emails, and spyware source code leaked online for anyone to see. But nearly three years later, the company trudges on, in large part thanks to a cash influx in 2016 from a mysterious investor who had been publicly unknown until now.

    The hack hurt the company’s reputation and bottom line: Hacking Team lost customers, was struggling to make new ones, and several key employees left. Three years later—after the appearance of this new investor—the company appears to have stopped the bleeding. The company registered around $1 million in losses in 2015, but bounced back with around $600,000 in profits in 2016.

    Motherboard has learned that this apparent recovery is in part thanks to the new investor, who appears to be from Saudi Arabia—and whose lawyer’s name matches that of a prominent Saudi attorney who regularly works for the Saudi Arabian government and facilitates deals between the government and international companies.

  • NSA exploit EternalBlue is back and powering WannaMine cryptojacking malware

    SAY HELLO to WannaMine, the cryptojacking malware that's using leaked NSA hacking tools to infiltrate computers and syphon processor power to crunch calculations needed to 'mine; cryptocurrencies.

    But first a history lesson. You may remember the EternalBlue, a Windows exploit developed by the NSA that was leaked by hacking group Shadow Brokers.

    Pretty soon after the exploit was used to launch the massive WannaCry ransomware attack that locked down NHS systems and affected some 230,000 computers across 150 countries. EternalBlue was then used to spearhead the arguably more dangerous NotPetya attacks.

  • Johnny Hacker hauls out NSA-crafted Server Message Block exploits, revamps 'em

    EternalBlue, EternalSynergy, EternalRomance and EternalChampion formed part of the arsenal of NSA-developed hacking tools that were leaked by the Shadow Brokers group before they were used (in part) to mount the devastating NotPetya cyber attack.

    [...]

    "After that, the exploit module will drop to disk (or use a PowerShell command), explains zerosum0x0, and then copy directly to the hard drive."

  • 10 tips for making the Django Admin more secure

    Offloading the responsibility for making your app secure onto QA testers or an information security office is tempting, but security is everyone's responsibility. The Django Admin is one of our favorite features of Django, but unless it's locked down correctly, it presents opportunities for exploitation. To save your users from compromised data, here are 10 tips to make the Django Admin more secure.

11 Myths About the RISC-V ISA

Filed under
Hardware
OSS

Despite its rich ecosystem and growing number of real-world implementations, misconceptions about RISC-V are keeping companies around the world from fully realizing its benefits.

Read more

Mozilla: Rust, Privacy and More

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Where’s Rust headed in 2018? Ask the community.

    2017 was a big year for the Rust systems programming language. Now, members of the open source project are looking to consolidate last year’s progress – making Rust easier to learn and use – and publish the first major update to the stable 2015 Rust release.

    “We’re making Rust a much nicer place to be,” said Aaron Turon, a Rust core team member and engineering manager at Mozilla. “We’re working to create a more productive environment for programmers – especially those new to the language.”

  • The 2018 Rust Event Lineup

    Every year there are multiple Rust events around the world, bringing together the community. Despite being early in the year, we’re excited to be able to highlight several events that are already being organized!

  • This Week in Rust 219

    Hello and welcome to another issue of This Week in Rust! Rust is a systems language pursuing the trifecta: safety, concurrency, and speed. This is a weekly summary of its progress and community. Want something mentioned? Tweet us at @ThisWeekInRust or send us a pull request. Want to get involved? We love contributions.

  • Retrospective: Looking Glass

    In December, we launched a tv show tie-in with Mr. Robot, Looking Glass, that alarmed some people because we didn’t think hard enough about the implications of shipping an add on that had the potential to be both confusing and upsetting. We’re deeply sorry for this and we understand why it’s important for us to learn and grow from this experience. As mentioned last month, we conducted a post-mortem to better understand how and why this happened and how we can do better.

  • Mozilla Reps Community: Rep of the Month – December 2017
  • Mozilla Security Blog: Preventing data leaks by stripping path information in HTTP Referrers

    To help prevent third party data leakage while browsing privately, Firefox Private Browsing Mode will remove path information from referrers sent to third parties starting in Firefox 59.

More in Tux Machines

Events: Linux Fest Northwest and OSCON, Intel's OSTS, LibreOffice Hackfests and Debian at ICFP 2019

  • GNOME on the Road: Linux Fest Northwest and OSCON

    Linux Fest Northwest took place back in April, and we were there! Sri Ramkrishna and I hung out in Bellingham, Washington (USA), meeting GNOMEies, free software contributors, and open source enthusiasts.

  • Intel Shares Highlights From Their 2019 Open-Source Technology Summit

    Taking place back in May at the beautiful Skamania Lodge in Washington was Intel's OSTS 2019 for their annual Open-Source Technology Summit that traditionally was internal-only but has begun opening up including allowing external participants this year. I was at OSTS 2019 and it's by far my highlight of the year with many really great sessions and a lot of useful networking at the event. Intel's open-source team has now shared some video recordings from this open-source/Linux event. 

  • Annual Report 2018: LibreOffice Hackfests

    Most LibreOffice developers are working from their home offices, so hackfests provide a unique opportunity to spend some time working shoulder-to-shoulder with their peers. In 2018, LibreOffice developers and community members met at four hackfests in Brussels, Hamburg, Tirana and Munich.

  • ICFP 2019

    ICFP 2019 in Berlin ended yesterday, and it was – as always – a great pleasure. This year was particularly noteworthy for the quite affordable conference hotel and the absolutely amazing food during the coffee breaks.

OSS Leftovers

  • How open source is benefitting SUSE, its channel partners and customers

    Open source technology is being talked about even more rampantly today. Phillip Cockrell, Vice President of Global Channels, SUSE articulates, “More than anything, open source is the core of innovation. It is by all and for all and propelling all aspects of technology development today.” SUSE, a native open source software company, which provides reliable, software-defined infrastructure and application delivery solutions that give organisations greater control and flexibility, is a seasoned 25-year-old player in the domain.

  • What is AOSP? Android Open Source Project, the ‘Android without Google’

    AOSP is the acronym for Android Open Supply Challenge ; that’s, ‘Android Open Source Project’. So it's simply the supply code of Android, the cellular working system of the Mountain View firm. However what’s it for? Its fundamental software is by OEMs; cellular producers obtain AOSP and make their 'ROM inventory', but additionally serves as the premise for customized ROMs and forks. AOSP, or Android Open Supply Challenge, isn’t the identical as Android Inventory . Whereas AOSP is the supply code of the working system, Android Inventory is the 'pure model' with out bloatware of any sort and solely with apps and Google providers, in addition to the native launcher. AOSP, nevertheless, is the premise of Android Vanilla , which is the model that’s distributed to smartphone producers and is topic to modifications. On it, the producer's personal purposes and providers are launched, and naturally the customization layer and the variations which can be essential for particular elements to work.

  • How to Avoid Technical Debt in Open Source Projects
  • Introducing OpenDrop, an open-source implementation of Apple AirDrop written in Python

    A group of German researchers recently published a paper “A Billion Open Interfaces for Eve and Mallory: MitM, DoS, and Tracking Attacks on iOS and macOS Through Apple Wireless Direct Link”, at the 28th USENIX Security Symposium (August 14–16), USA. The paper reveals security and privacy vulnerabilities in Apple’s AirDrop file-sharing service as well as denial-of-service (DoS) attacks which leads to privacy leaks or simultaneous crashing of all neighboring devices. As part of the research, Milan Stute and Alexander Heinrich, two researchers have developed an open-source implementation of Apple AirDrop written in Python – OpenDrop. OpenDrop is like a FOSS implementation of AirDrop. It is an experimental software and is the result of reverse engineering efforts by the Open Wireless Link project (OWL). It is compatible with Apple AirDrop and used for sharing files among Apple devices such as iOS and macOS or on Linux systems running an open re-implementation of Apple Wireless Direct Link (AWDL).

  • The Top 13 Free and Open Source Storage Solutions

    In this article we will examine free and open source storage solutions by providing a brief overview of what to expect, as well as blurbs on each tool.

  • Open Source Origination Technology Platform for Online Lenders

    DigiFi was founded by Joshua Jersey and Bradley Vanderstarren in 2014. It started its life as Promise Financial, an online lender, and raised $110 million in credit capital. It built up its own proprietary tech as there was no solution provider in 2014 offering an end-to-end loan origination platform that could automate the entire process. They sold off the tech to a large lending institution in 2017 and pivoted to DigiFi, one of the world’s first open source loan origination systems (LOS) which equips the lenders with flexible and modern tools to create unique platforms and digital experiences.

  • IT favors open source networking over Cisco ACI, VMware NSX

    Companies trying to avoid or lessen the use of expensive network automation software from Cisco and VMware are turning to open source tools that are often good enough for many tasks associated with managing complex modern networks. Cisco's application-centric infrastructure (ACI) and VMware's NSX are powerful technologies for operating networks built on the vendors' respective products. But many large enterprises have data centers filled with perfectly good multivendor hardware and software that very few organizations are willing to swap for an all Cisco or VMware alternative. Therefore, companies are turning to open source networking products, such as Ansible, Chef, Puppet and SaltStack, for automating many network-related chores across as much of the data center as possible, while relegating ACI and NSX to Cisco- or VMware-only portions of the network.

  • What Attorneys Should Know About Open Source Software Licensing

    With the next waves of technological change, such as autonomous vehicles, blockchain, and IoT, newer, more complex OSS licenses may be drafted, and argued in the courts, to protect the interests of software innovators and the OSS community.

Open Data: Schlumberger and Waymo

  • Schlumberger open-sources data ecosystem, contributing to industrywide data development
  • Schlumberger Open Sources Data Ecosystem

    Oilfield services company Schlumberger said it will open source its data ecosystem and contribute to The Open Group Open Subsurface Data Universe (OSDU) Forum to accelerate the delivery of the OSDU Data Platform. The OSDU Forum is an international forum of oil and gas operators, cloud services companies, technology providers, suppliers of applications to oil and gas operators, academia and other standards organizations working together to develop an open, standards-based, data platform that will bring together exploration, development and wells data.

  • Waymo open-sources data set for autonomous vehicle multimodal sensors

    Waymo, the Alphabet subsidiary that hopes to someday pepper roads with self-driving taxis, today pulled back the curtains on a portion of the data used to train the algorithms underpinning its cars: The Waymo Open Dataset. Waymo principal scientist Dragomir Anguelov claims it’s the largest multimodal sensor sample corpus for autonomous driving released to date. “[W]e are inviting the research community to join us with the [debut] of the Waymo Open Dataset, [which is composed] of high-resolution sensor data collected by Waymo self-driving vehicles,” wrote Anguelov in a blog post published this morning. “Data is a critical ingredient for machine learning … [and] this rich and diverse set of real-world experiences has helped our engineers and researchers develop Waymo’s self-driving technology and innovative models and algorithms.”

Linux Foundation: Open Mainframe, Cloud Native Computing Foundation, IBM and More