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March 2018

More Windows Server vs. Linux Benchmark Tests With Spectre/Meltdown Mitigations

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Last week I posted an article looking at the Relative Spectre/Meltdown Mitigation Costs On Windows vs. Linux. Today from a different system and using Windows Server 2016 rather than Windows 10 are some fresh benchmarks doing a similar comparison with different hardware and also looking at the Spectre and Meltdown mitigation performance impact again on Ubuntu 18.04 LTS and Clear Linux.

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Red Hat looks beyond Linux

Filed under
Linux
Red Hat

The Red Hat Linux distribution is turning 25 years old this week. What started as one of the earliest Linux distributions is now the most successful open-source company, and its success was a catalyst for others to follow its model. Today’s open-source world is very different from those heady days in the mid-1990s when Linux looked to be challenging Microsoft’s dominance on the desktop, but Red Hat is still going strong.

To put all of this into perspective, I sat down with the company’s current CEO (and former Delta Air Lines COO) Jim Whitehurst to talk about the past, present and future of the company, and open-source software in general. Whitehurst took the Red Hat CEO position 10 years ago, so while he wasn’t there in the earliest days, he definitely witnessed the evolution of open source in the enterprise, which is now more widespread than every.

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Stable kernels 4.15.15, 4.14.32, 4.9.92 and 4.4.126

Filed under
Linux

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • “Top Notch” Android Phones Are Utterly Stupid And I Feel Sorry For Them

    I’m not going to dive deep and rant about all the “courageous” paths taken by Apple that I didn’t like. I’m not going to discuss why Apple ditched the 3.5mm headphone jack or why it chose to push proprietary connectors and standards. However, since this article is all about notches and Android device manufacturers are hellbent on copying Apple, changes brought in iPhone X can’t be ignored.

  • Days of Future_Open
  • [Podcast] PodCTL #31 – Reviewing Kubernetes 1.10

    Like clockwork, a new release of Kubernetes comes out every quarter. And with the arrival of Spring comes Kubernetes 1.10. Stability, Security, Networking and Storage are front of center of the new release. This week we dig into the 1.10 release and highlight some of the features that we believe will have the biggest impact on customers being able to deploy more applications on Kubernetes (and ultimately OpenShift).

  • Qubes Version 4.0 Released, Purism Laptops Shipping Quickly, New Rust Version 1.25.0 and More

    Purism announces that its Librem laptop orders are now shipping within a week—in other words, on average, the company now can fulfill orders within five business days. See the Purism blog for more information on this milestone.

  • GDC 2018 Videos Now Available, Including Khronos/Vulkan Talks

    If you are looking for some deep technical content to watch this weekend, the video recordings from this month's Game Developers Conference 2018 (GDC 18) are now available.

  • The ways of the GNOME people

    Hidden away in the farthest corner of the planet, its slopes covered in mist and darkness and its peaks lost in the clouds, stands the formidable Mount GNOME. Perched atop the mountain is a castle as menacing as the mountain itself – its towering walls made of stones as cold as death, and the wind howling through the courtyard like a dozen witches screaming for blood.

    Living inside the imposing blackness are a group of feral savages, of whom very little is known to the world outside. The deathly walls of the castle bear testimony to their skull-crushing barbarism, and their vile customs have laid waste to the surrounding slopes and valleys. Mortally fearful of invoking their mad wrath, no human traveller has dared to come near the vicinity of their territory. Shrouded in anonymity, they draw their name from the impregnable mountain that they inhabit – they are the GNOME people.

  • Leak Hunting and Mutter Hacking

    Last week, when I upgraded to GNOME 3.28, I was sad to notice an extremely annoying bug in Mutter/GNOME Shell: every once in a while, a micro-stuttering happened. This was in additions to another bug that was disappointing me for quite a while: the tiling/maximize/unmaximize animations were not working on Wayland too.

  • openSUSE Elections Postponed

    The elections for the openSUSE Board have been postponed until April 15.

    The postponement will extend Phase 1 of the elections and give candidates more time to campaign and engage with the community. The voting phase (Phase 2) will start April 15.

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • Best Content Management System

    Unless you've been living under a rock, you most certainly have heard of WordPress, one of the most popular blogging platforms around that also happens to be 100% open source. WordPress powers 27% of the web from personal to corporate to even government sites (Whitehouse.gov for one).

    In a 2008 interview, Linux Journal's Katherine Druckman asked WordPress founder Matt Mullenweg, "You frequently have reiterated your commitment to open-source ideals and GPL licensing. How has this commitment factored into the development of your company, Automattic? How do you use open-source technology to achieve your goals?"

  • Chime in: Which features could Microsoft 'steal' from Linux?
  • Dumping your USB

     

    One of the many new features of OpenBSD 6.3 is the possibility to dump USB traffic to userland via bpf(4). This can be done with tcpdump(8) by specifying a USB bus as interface:

  • LG re-open sources WebOS, a look at the AI behind the Pixel 2's camera, and more news
  • 6 differences between agile and traditional planning

    Traditional and agile planning methods both focus on developing strategies to lead teams to succeed in today's competitive landscape; however, their approaches are quite distinct. If you're transitioning from traditional to agile planning, it's important to understand their substantially different mindsets and leadership styles.

  • Product Review: GitStorage

    By profession, I'm a software developer. Aside from a preferred editor, what matters most to a developer is the use of a Source Code Manager (SCM). So, when a new product comes along featuring my favorite SCM, Git, I had no choice but to spend some time using it.

  • FOSS Project Spotlight: CloudMapper, an AWS Visualization Tool

    When working with AWS, it's common to have a number of separate accounts run by different teams for different projects. Gaining an understanding of how those accounts are configured is best accomplished by visually displaying the resources of the account and how these resources can communicate. This complements a traditional asset inventory.

    Duo built CloudMapper to generate interactive network diagrams of AWS accounts and released it as open source on Github.

Carnegie Mellon University's 'Open-Source' 3-D Bioprinter

Filed under
Hardware
  • Could this $500 open-source printer be the RepRap of 3D bioprinters?

    Researchers from Adam Feinberg’s lab at Carnegie Mellon University have developed an open-source 3D bioprinter that can be built affordably using a modified desktop 3D printer. The large-volume extruder (LVE) component of the bioprinter can be 3D printed.

  • Carnegie Mellon University researchers publish designs for open-source 3D bioprinter

    Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have developed an open-source, low-cost 3D bioprinter. They have published a paper in HardwareX with the complete instructions for the installation of a syringe-based large volume extruder (LVE) on a desktop FDM 3D printer.

    The LVE allows users to print artificial human tissues at a high resolution and scale. It is designed to print a range of materials, including biopolymers, hydrogels, pastes and epoxies.

    Adam Feinberg, one of the authors of the paper and a Biomedical Engineering Associate Professor at Carnegie Mellon, said “The LVE 3D bioprinter allows us to print much larger tissue scaffolds, at the scale of an entire human heart, with high quality.”

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos

KDE: QupZilla/Falkon and KDE Connect Development

Filed under
KDE
  • Yahoo hit QupZilla.

    As most you already know as an XFCE environment installation comes with QupZilla web browser.
    The QupZilla web browser is a lightweight multiplatform web browser written in Qt Framework and using its web rendering engine QtWebEngine.
    If you using Fedora 28 the you can get the Falkon web browser.
    The wikipedia tell us about Falkon browser "(formerly QupZilla[3]) is a free and open-source web browser, intended for general users. Falkon is licensed under GPLv3."
    The Falkon browser working well with Yahoo.

  • Building KDE Connect

    After I shared the link to the KDE Connect Development Telegram group almost 20 people joined within 24 hours. I certainly did not expect such a interest in KDE Connect. When I joined the project about a year ago the hardest part for me was setting up a proper development workflow, meaning configuring, building, installing and debugging the application and interacting with git and Phabricator. To ease your start in KDE Connect development I would like to give you the guide I wish I had back then.

    I will show you how to fetch the project, build, run and debug it using KDevelop. It’s an IDE by the KDE Community designed with KDE projects in mind. In theory you can use any IDE you like, if you figure out how to configure it properly.

  • KDE Connect – New stuff I

    In my first post about KDE Connect I told you about the album cover art on Android. Thanks to Matthijs it now also works when the cover art is a local file, for example when you are using VLC. It already worked when the cover art was a remote URL, for example with Spotify. The cover art is now also shown in the media control notification and added to the Android media session.

More in Tux Machines

Qt 5.15 Beta1 Released

I am happy to announce to you Qt 5.15 is moved to Beta phase and we have released Qt 5.15 Beta1 today. As earlier our plan is to publish new Beta N releases regularly until Qt 5.15 is ready for RC. Current estimate for Qt 5.15 RC is ~ end of April, see details from Qt 5.15 releasing wiki. Please take a tour now & test Beta1 packages. As usual you can get Qt 5.15 Beta1 by using Qt online installer (for new installations) or by using maintenance tool from your existing Qt online installation. Separate Beta1 source packages are also available in qt account and in download.qt.io Read more

Fedora’s gaggle of desktops

There are 38 different desktops or window managers in Fedora 31. You could try a different one every day for a month, and still have some left over. Some have very few features. Some have so many features they are called a desktop environment. This article can’t go into detail on each, but it’s interesting to see the whole list in one place. To be on this list, the desktop must show up on the desktop manager’s selection list. If the desktop has more than one entry in the desktop manager list, they are counted just as that one desktop. An example is “GNOME”, “GNOME Classic” and “GNOME (Wayland).” These all show up on the desktop manager list, but they are still just GNOME. Read more

Programming: 'DevOps', Caddyfile, GCC 8.4 RC and Forth

  • A beginner's guide to everything DevOps

    While there is no single definition, I consider DevOps to be a process framework that ensures collaboration between development and operations teams to deploy code to production environments faster in a repeatable and automated way. We will spend the rest of this article unpacking that statement. The word "DevOps" is an amalgamation of the words "development" and "operations." DevOps helps increase the speed of delivering applications and services. It allows organizations to serve their customers efficiently and become more competitive in the market. In simple terms, DevOps is an alignment between development and IT operations with better communication and collaboration. DevOps assumes a culture where collaboration among the development, operations, and business teams is considered a critical aspect of the journey. It's not solely about the tools, as DevOps in an organization creates continuous value for customers. Tools are one of its pillars, alongside people and processes. DevOps increases organizations' capability to deliver high-quality solutions at a swift pace. It automates all processes, from build to deployment, of an application or a product.

  • How to solve the DevOps vs. ITSM culture clash

    Since its advent, DevOps has been pitted against IT service management (ITSM) and its ITIL framework. Some say "ITIL is under siege," some ask you to choose sides, while others frame them as complementary. What is true is that both DevOps and ITSM have fans and detractors, and each method can influence software delivery and overall corporate culture.

  • JFrog Launches JFrog Multi-Cloud Universal DevOps Platform

    DevOps technology company JFrog has announced its new hybrid, multi-cloud, universal DevOps platform called the JFrog Platform that drives continuous software releases from any source to any destination. By delivering tools in an all-in-one solution, the JFrog Platform aims to empower organizations, developers and DevOps engineers to meet increased delivery requirements. For the uninitiated, JFrog is the creator of Artifactory, the heart of the Universal DevOps platform for automating, managing, securing, distributing, and monitoring all types of technologies.

  • New Caddyfile and more

    The new Caddyfile enables experimental HTTP3 support. Also I’ve added a few redirects to my new domain. All www prefix requests get redirected to their version without www prefix. My old domain nullday.de redirects now to my new domain shibumi.dev. Also I had to add connect-src 'self' to my CSP, because Google Lighthouse seems to have problems with defalt-src 'none'. If just default-src 'none' is being set, Google Lighthouse can’t access your robot.txt. This seems to be an issue in the Google Lighthouse implementation, the Google Search Bot is not affected.

  • Content Addressed Vocabulary

    How can systems communicate and share meaning? Communication within systems is preceded by a form of meta-communication; we must have a sense that we mean the same things by the terms we use before we can even use them. This is challenging enough for humans who must share meaning, but we can resolve ambiguities with context clues from a surrounding narrative. Machines, in general, need a context more explicitly laid out for them, with as little ambiguity as possible. Standards authors of open-world systems have long struggled with such systems and have come up with some reasonable systems; unfortunately these also suffer from several pitfalls. With minimal (or sometimes none at all) adjustment to our tooling, I propose a change in how we manage ontologies.

  • GCC 8.4 Release Candidate available from gcc.gnu.org
    The first release candidate for GCC 8.4 is available from
    
     https://gcc.gnu.org/pub/gcc/snapshots/8.4.0-RC-20200226/
     ftp://gcc.gnu.org/pub/gcc/snapshots/8.4.0-RC-20200226/
    
    and shortly its mirrors.  It has been generated from git commit
    r8-10091-gf80c40f93f9e8781b14f1a8301467f117fd24051.
    
    I have so far bootstrapped and tested the release candidate on
    x86_64-linux and i686-linux.  Please test it and report any issues to
    bugzilla.
    
    If all goes well, I'd like to release 8.4 on Wednesday, March 4th.
    
  • GCC 8.4 RC Compiler Released For Testing

    GCC 8.4 will hopefully be released next week but for now a release candidate is available for testing the latest bug fixes in the mature GCC8 series. GCC 8.4 is aiming for release next week as potentially the last of the GCC8 series while GCC 9.3 is also coming soon. GCC 8.4 represents all of the relevant bug fixes over the past year for back-porting to users still on GCC 8. GCC 10 (in the form of version GCC 10.1) meanwhile as the next feature release should be out in the next month or two.

  • Excellent Free Tutorials to Learn Forth

    Forth is an imperative stack-based programming language, and a member of the class of extensible interactive languages. It was created by Charles Moore in 1970 to control telescopes in observatories using small computers. Because of its roots, Forth stresses efficiency, compactness, flexible and efficient hardware/software interaction. Forth has a number of properties that contrast it from many other programming languages. In particular, Forth has no inherent keywords and is extensible. It is both a low level and high level language. It has the interesting property of being able to compile itself into a new compiler, debug itself and to experiment in real time as the system is built. Forth is an extremely flexible language, with high portability, compact source and object code, and a language that is easy to learn, program and debug. It has an incremental compiler, an interpreter and a very fast edit-compile-test cycle. Forth uses a stack to pass data between words, and it uses the raw memory for more permanent storage. It also lets coders write their own control structures. Forth has often being deployed in embedded systems due to the compactness of object code. Forth is also used in boot loaders such as Open Firmware (developed by Sun Microsystems) as well as scientific fields such as astronomy, mathematics, oceanography and electrical engineering.

Python Programming

  • Adding Metadata to PDFs

    For both Django Crash Course and the forthcoming Two Scoops of Django 3.x, we're using a new process to render the PDFs. Unfortunately, until just a few days ago that process didn't include the cover. Instead, covers were inserted manually using Adobe Acrobat. [...] The lesson I learned writing this little utility is that as useful as Google and Stack Overflow might be, sometimes you need to explore reference manuals. Which, if you ask me, is a lot of fun. :-)

  • A Week At A Time - Building SaaS #46

    In this episode, we worked on a weekly view for the Django app. We made navigation that would let users click from one week to the next, then fixed up the view to pull time from that particular week. The first thing that I did was focus on the UI required to navigate to a new weekly view in the app. We mocked out the UI and talked briefly about the flexbox layout that is available to modern browsers. From the UI mock up, I changed the view code to include a previous_week_date and next_week_date in the view context so we could change the links to show real dates. From there, we needed a destination URL. I create a new path in the URLconf that connected the weekly URL to the existing app view that shows the week data. After wiring things together, I was able to extract the week date from the URL and make the view pull from the specified day and show that in the UI. Finally, we chatted about the tricky offset calculation that needs to happen to pull the right course tasks, but I ended the stream at that stage because the logic changes for that problem are tedious and very specific to my particular app.

  • Python 3.6.9 : Google give a new tool for python users.

    Today I discovered a real surprise gift made by the team from Google for the evolution of programmers. I say this because not everyone can afford hardware resources.

  • Learn Python Dictionary Data Structure – Part 3

    In this Part 3 of Python Data Structure series, we will be discussing what is a dictionary, how it differs from other data structure in python, how to create, delete dictionary objects and methods of dictionary objects.