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May 2018

Red Hat Leftovers

Filed under
Red Hat

Graphics DRM and Mesa 18.0.5 RC

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • A Reusable DRM Module To Be Worked On For "Underserved" Graphics Hardware

    While Kevin Brace of the OpenChrome project as the lead and only developer left working on this open-source VIA driver stack has restarted the discussion towards mainlining the OpenChrome DRM/KMS driver, he has decided to take a break from that for a few weeks and to focus on developing a "reusable DRM module" to help other vintage/obscure graphics hardware.

  • Mesa 18.0.5 release candidate

    The candidate for the Mesa 18.0.5 is now available. Currently we have:
    - 21 queued
    - 0 nominated (outstanding)
    - and 5 rejected patches

  • Mesa 18.0.5 Is The Last Planned Release In The Series

    Mesa 18.0.5 is the last planned point release for the Mesa 18.0 series that debuted at the end of March as the Q1'2018 release for Mesa3D.

    With Mesa 18.1 having been released earlier this month and on schedule, the Mesa 18.0 lifespan is relatively short with Mesa 18.1.1 now due for release in the days ahead. As such, the Mesa 18.0.5 release due out by the end of the week is their last planned maintenance release for this previous quarter's branch.

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos

Software: HandBrake, Plex Media Player, zchunk, Qalculate! and Cherrytree

Filed under
Software
  • HandBrake FFmpeg, no more Nvidia 32 bit drivers

    HandBrake has been updated again to track the master branch, as it now uses FFMpeg 4 and no longer libAV 12. This could probably lead to other improvements, like NVENC/CUDA support, more formats, etc.

    Starting with the Nvidia drivers version 396.24 there will be no more 32 bit support, the driver will be 64 bit only. The 32 bit libraries are still included, so Steam and other applications will keep on being supported.

  • Plex Media Player is back!

    Just a small post to notify that Plex Media Player package is back. Now it does not require Conan or Python anymore for building, and you can just build it using standard tools, the dependency issues between the Plex binary packages have been resolved.

  • What is zchunk?

    Over the past few months, I’ve been working on zchunk, a compression format that is designed to allow for good compression, but, more importantly, the ability to download only the differences between an old version of the file and a new version.

    The concept is similar to both zsync and casync, but it has some important differences. Let’s first look at how downloading a zchunk file works.

  • Qalculate! – The Best Calculator Application in The Entire Universe

    I have been a GNU-Linux user and a Debian user for more than a decade. As I started using the desktop more and more, it seemed to me that apart from few web-based services most of my needs were being met with desktop applications within Debian itself.

    One of such applications was the need for me to calculate between different measurements of units. While there are and were many web-services which can do the same, I wanted something which could do all this and more on my desktop for both privacy reasons as well as not having to hunt for a web service for doing one thing or the other. My search ended when I found Qalculate!.

  • Cherrytree – A Feature-Rich Wiki-Style Note-Taking App

    I recently wrote on Thetapad and Zim – both are excellent note-taking applications with their specialty geared towards different users. Today, thanks to suggestions from FossMint readers, I introduce to you Cherrytree.

    Cherrytree is a free and open source note-taking application with wiki-style text formatting, syntax highlighting, and advanced customizability settings.

    Its advanced search function allows you to locate files across the file tree irrespective of their location. It supports keyboard shortcuts, importing and exporting notes, syncing with cloud services like Dropbox, rich text formatting, and password protection to keep your notes secure.

Audiocasts/Shows: Ubuntu Podcast from the UK, CPLANE.ai, Curl

Filed under
Interviews
Ubuntu

Linux Mint 19 Beta Will Arrive on June 4, Final Release Expected at End of June

Filed under
Linux

The developer published the monthly news of the project for May 2018, announcing that Linux Mint 19 will enter beta stages on Monday, June 4, 2018, when users will be able to download the Linux Mint 19 Beta ISO images with Cinnamon, MATE, and Xfce desktop environments and participate in the beta testing program. The final release of Linux Mint 19 "Tara" is expected at the end of June.

"All 3 editions of Linux Mint 19 (Cinnamon, MATE, Xfce) are currently in QA. The various bugs which were found were fixed and we’re expecting them to pass QA tomorrow. We’re planning the BETA release for Monday the 4th," wrote Clement Lefebvre in the monthly newsletter. "The BETA phase for Mint 19 will be longer than usual, with a stable release planned for the end of June."

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Linux Lite 4.0 "Diamond" Launches Officially Based on Ubuntu 18.04 LTS

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

Dubbed "Diamond" and powered by the Linux 4.15 kernel series from the Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) operating system, Linux Lite 4.0 series launches officially today as the first release to drop support for 32-bit installations, bringing numerous updated components, new features and major design changes that include new system theme (Adapta) and icon sets (Papirus).

"Faenza icons were dropped as it had not been maintained in some time (albeit there is a fork) and the same for the Arc theme, development seems to have stalled there," said Jerry Bezencon in the release announcement. "Most of our approach to theming in Series 4.x follows the popular Flat design focus. We also now use the Openzone mouse theme."

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Desktop Consolidation Gives SparkyLinux a Clearer Focus

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

You can run SparkyLinux from a thumb drive. You also can supercharge its performance by loading it into your computer's RAM.

However, the OS is not really as useful if you use it only for a portable computing platform. It performs best when installed on the hard drive. SparkyLinux does not use a frugal installation and special antics to provide persistent memory.

SparkyLinux is a very functional Linux OS. It is a solid choice for use as an all-purpose home edition with all the tools, codecs, plugins and drivers preinstalled.

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How open source supports CERN's Large Hadron Collider

Filed under
Server
OSS

The 27-kilometre-long Large Hadron Collider (LHC) buried beneath the France-Switzerland border near Geneva is best known for helping to prove the existence of the Higgs' Boson particle - otherwise known as the God particle - crucial to the Standard Model of particle physics.

The LHC, which uses superconducting magnets to steer beams through its long pipes at just below the speed of light, is supported by open source IT systems at CERN to crunch through about 60 petabytes of data a year. These are built with Openstack, a free and open source software platform for building clouds.

The Openstack cloud first went into production at CERN in July 2013, marking the 13,000-physicist-strong laboratory as an early adopter. Today it has scaled to roughly 300,000 cores – and it's this kind of high-powered, scalable, open source cloud computing that got the attention of many private enterprises, now contributing to the code.

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Also: Why You Should Do It Yourself

More in Tux Machines

Programming: Python Shows, Golang and GNOME/GLib Work

  • Python Bytes: #144 Are you mocking me? It won't work!
  • Talk Python to Me: #226 Building Flask APIs for data scientists

    If you're a data scientist, how do you deliver your analysis and your models to the people who need them? A really good option is to serve them over Flask as an API. But there are some special considerations you might keep in mind. How should you structure this API? What type of project structures work best for data science and Flask web apps? That and much more on this episode of Talk Python To Me with guest AJ Pryor.

  • Golang or go home: how Curve is taking Golang to new heights

    Emerging only in 2009, Golang is still relatively new and not as widely used as other mainstream coding languages. This young language was incubated inside Google, and has already been proven to perform well on a massive scale. We wanted to share with you a few reasons why we love Golang (Go) and how Curve is using it. Go has excellent characteristics for scalability and services written using it typically have very small memory footprints. Because code is compiled into a single static binary, services can also be containerised with ease, making it much simpler to build and deploy. These attributes make Go an ideal choice for companies building microservices, as you can easily deploy into a highly available and scalable environment such as Kubernetes. Go has everything you need to build APIs as part of its standard library.

  • GTimeVal deprecation in GLib 2.61.2

    One of the latest changes in GLib (released in 2.61.2) is the deprecation of GTimeVal, g_get_current_time(), and a number of other time functions. This is because we can’t guarantee they’re wide enough on all platforms to be year-2038-safe. Instead, you should use GDateTime or, if you just need to store epoch time, guint64. They are year-2038-safe — and with that, GLib should be entirely year-2038-safe. GTimeVal is used in a number of places, and widespread (but simple) changes will need to be made to stop using it. You will likely have already seen some deprecation warnings popping up to inform you of this, if you use any C-based and GLib-based libraries. If you can’t allocate time to fixing these deprecation warnings yet, you can silence them by explicitly stating your minimum and maximum supported versions of GLib. If your minimum supported version of GLib is older than 2.62, you won’t see deprecation warnings for GTimeVal (since it was deprecated in 2.62, and your code is claiming to need to support older GLib versions than that).

  • Mayank Sharma: GSoC’19 - GVfs and the Google Backend demystified

    Note: Due to time limitations, I haven’t been able to devote much time to writing a blog post. Each time I started, some or the other thing bothered me and I ended up having a draft. My humble apologies to my readers. So, over the past 3 months or so, I’ve been working on the Google Backend for GVfs (GNOME Virtual File System), and as of today, the backend is in a state where it’s completely useable. Earlier, a large number of operations were disabled. So, if you tried to copy a file from one folder to the other, you’d be given an error “Operation not supported”. Now, you may be wondering what’s there in a simple copy operation that the developers/maintainers can’t fix, or shouldn’t something like Google Drive backend for GVfs receive better attention since a great deal of peope keep their important data on their G-Drive? The answer isn’t a yes or no, and it’s much more subjective since it pertains to the state of current open-source software. One of the big reasons has been that OSS always lacks man-power, and that the problem at hand wasn’t trivial in any sense. My mentor (Ondrej Holy), is the sole maintainer of a project as big as GVfs, and he certainly doesn’t have the time of look at each backend’s issues.

Events: Linux Fest Northwest and OSCON, Intel's OSTS, LibreOffice Hackfests and Debian at ICFP 2019

  • GNOME on the Road: Linux Fest Northwest and OSCON

    Linux Fest Northwest took place back in April, and we were there! Sri Ramkrishna and I hung out in Bellingham, Washington (USA), meeting GNOMEies, free software contributors, and open source enthusiasts.

  • Intel Shares Highlights From Their 2019 Open-Source Technology Summit

    Taking place back in May at the beautiful Skamania Lodge in Washington was Intel's OSTS 2019 for their annual Open-Source Technology Summit that traditionally was internal-only but has begun opening up including allowing external participants this year. I was at OSTS 2019 and it's by far my highlight of the year with many really great sessions and a lot of useful networking at the event. Intel's open-source team has now shared some video recordings from this open-source/Linux event. 

  • Annual Report 2018: LibreOffice Hackfests

    Most LibreOffice developers are working from their home offices, so hackfests provide a unique opportunity to spend some time working shoulder-to-shoulder with their peers. In 2018, LibreOffice developers and community members met at four hackfests in Brussels, Hamburg, Tirana and Munich.

  • ICFP 2019

    ICFP 2019 in Berlin ended yesterday, and it was – as always – a great pleasure. This year was particularly noteworthy for the quite affordable conference hotel and the absolutely amazing food during the coffee breaks.

OSS Leftovers

  • How open source is benefitting SUSE, its channel partners and customers

    Open source technology is being talked about even more rampantly today. Phillip Cockrell, Vice President of Global Channels, SUSE articulates, “More than anything, open source is the core of innovation. It is by all and for all and propelling all aspects of technology development today.” SUSE, a native open source software company, which provides reliable, software-defined infrastructure and application delivery solutions that give organisations greater control and flexibility, is a seasoned 25-year-old player in the domain.

  • What is AOSP? Android Open Source Project, the ‘Android without Google’

    AOSP is the acronym for Android Open Supply Challenge ; that’s, ‘Android Open Source Project’. So it's simply the supply code of Android, the cellular working system of the Mountain View firm. However what’s it for? Its fundamental software is by OEMs; cellular producers obtain AOSP and make their 'ROM inventory', but additionally serves as the premise for customized ROMs and forks. AOSP, or Android Open Supply Challenge, isn’t the identical as Android Inventory . Whereas AOSP is the supply code of the working system, Android Inventory is the 'pure model' with out bloatware of any sort and solely with apps and Google providers, in addition to the native launcher. AOSP, nevertheless, is the premise of Android Vanilla , which is the model that’s distributed to smartphone producers and is topic to modifications. On it, the producer's personal purposes and providers are launched, and naturally the customization layer and the variations which can be essential for particular elements to work.

  • How to Avoid Technical Debt in Open Source Projects
  • Introducing OpenDrop, an open-source implementation of Apple AirDrop written in Python

    A group of German researchers recently published a paper “A Billion Open Interfaces for Eve and Mallory: MitM, DoS, and Tracking Attacks on iOS and macOS Through Apple Wireless Direct Link”, at the 28th USENIX Security Symposium (August 14–16), USA. The paper reveals security and privacy vulnerabilities in Apple’s AirDrop file-sharing service as well as denial-of-service (DoS) attacks which leads to privacy leaks or simultaneous crashing of all neighboring devices. As part of the research, Milan Stute and Alexander Heinrich, two researchers have developed an open-source implementation of Apple AirDrop written in Python – OpenDrop. OpenDrop is like a FOSS implementation of AirDrop. It is an experimental software and is the result of reverse engineering efforts by the Open Wireless Link project (OWL). It is compatible with Apple AirDrop and used for sharing files among Apple devices such as iOS and macOS or on Linux systems running an open re-implementation of Apple Wireless Direct Link (AWDL).

  • The Top 13 Free and Open Source Storage Solutions

    In this article we will examine free and open source storage solutions by providing a brief overview of what to expect, as well as blurbs on each tool.

  • Open Source Origination Technology Platform for Online Lenders

    DigiFi was founded by Joshua Jersey and Bradley Vanderstarren in 2014. It started its life as Promise Financial, an online lender, and raised $110 million in credit capital. It built up its own proprietary tech as there was no solution provider in 2014 offering an end-to-end loan origination platform that could automate the entire process. They sold off the tech to a large lending institution in 2017 and pivoted to DigiFi, one of the world’s first open source loan origination systems (LOS) which equips the lenders with flexible and modern tools to create unique platforms and digital experiences.

  • IT favors open source networking over Cisco ACI, VMware NSX

    Companies trying to avoid or lessen the use of expensive network automation software from Cisco and VMware are turning to open source tools that are often good enough for many tasks associated with managing complex modern networks. Cisco's application-centric infrastructure (ACI) and VMware's NSX are powerful technologies for operating networks built on the vendors' respective products. But many large enterprises have data centers filled with perfectly good multivendor hardware and software that very few organizations are willing to swap for an all Cisco or VMware alternative. Therefore, companies are turning to open source networking products, such as Ansible, Chef, Puppet and SaltStack, for automating many network-related chores across as much of the data center as possible, while relegating ACI and NSX to Cisco- or VMware-only portions of the network.

  • What Attorneys Should Know About Open Source Software Licensing

    With the next waves of technological change, such as autonomous vehicles, blockchain, and IoT, newer, more complex OSS licenses may be drafted, and argued in the courts, to protect the interests of software innovators and the OSS community.

Open Data: Schlumberger and Waymo

  • Schlumberger open-sources data ecosystem, contributing to industrywide data development
  • Schlumberger Open Sources Data Ecosystem

    Oilfield services company Schlumberger said it will open source its data ecosystem and contribute to The Open Group Open Subsurface Data Universe (OSDU) Forum to accelerate the delivery of the OSDU Data Platform. The OSDU Forum is an international forum of oil and gas operators, cloud services companies, technology providers, suppliers of applications to oil and gas operators, academia and other standards organizations working together to develop an open, standards-based, data platform that will bring together exploration, development and wells data.

  • Waymo open-sources data set for autonomous vehicle multimodal sensors

    Waymo, the Alphabet subsidiary that hopes to someday pepper roads with self-driving taxis, today pulled back the curtains on a portion of the data used to train the algorithms underpinning its cars: The Waymo Open Dataset. Waymo principal scientist Dragomir Anguelov claims it’s the largest multimodal sensor sample corpus for autonomous driving released to date. “[W]e are inviting the research community to join us with the [debut] of the Waymo Open Dataset, [which is composed] of high-resolution sensor data collected by Waymo self-driving vehicles,” wrote Anguelov in a blog post published this morning. “Data is a critical ingredient for machine learning … [and] this rich and diverse set of real-world experiences has helped our engineers and researchers develop Waymo’s self-driving technology and innovative models and algorithms.”