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July 2018

Dell XPS 13 Kabylake Makes For A Great Linux Laptop

Filed under
Hardware
Reviews

When it comes to new laptops for the summer of 2018 that are Linux-friendly, the latest-generation Dell XPS 13 with Intel Kabylake-R processor ranks high on that list. Recent in upgrading my main production workstation, I decided to go with the Dell XPS 13 9370 while using Fedora Workstation 28 and it's been a phenomenal combination. Here are my thoughts on the current Dell XPS 13 as well as some benchmarks and other information.

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Games Leftovers

Filed under
Gaming

Here's the New Login Screen of Ubuntu 18.10 (Cosmic Cuttlefish) with Yaru Theme

Filed under
Ubuntu

One of the most attractive things about the forthcoming Ubuntu 18.10 operating system, due for release later this fall on October 18, 2018, is its new look and feel, which is provided by the so-called Communitheme that was recently renamed as Yaru, a system-wide theme for Ubuntu Desktop.

As part of this community initiative, Ubuntu 18.10 will get a brand-new look and feel that will make the popular computer operating system more modern, more accessible, and more attractive. And, today we finally have a first look at the Yaru theme on the current Ubuntu 18.10 (Cosmic Cuttlefish) development release.

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Red Hat's Latest Articles, OpenShift, and Finance

Filed under
Red Hat
  • How to be the lazy sysadmin

    The job of a Linux SysAdmin is always complex and often fraught with various pitfalls and obstacles. Ranging from never having enough time to do everything, to having the Pointy-Haired Boss (PHB) staring over your shoulder while you try to work on the task that she or he just gave you, to having the most critical server in your care crash at the most inopportune time, problems and challenges abound. I have found that becoming the Lazy Sysadmin can help.

  • What's in a container image: Meeting the legal challenges

    Container technology has, for many years, been transforming how workloads in data centers are managed and speeding the cycle of application development and deployment.

    In addition, container images are increasingly used as a distribution format, with container registries a mechanism for software distribution. Isn't this just like packages distributed using package management tools? Not quite. While container image distribution is similar to RPMs, DEBs, and other package management systems (for example, storing and distributing archives of files), the implications of container image distribution are more complicated. It is not the fault of container technology itself; rather, it's because container distribution is used differently than package management systems.

  • The top requirement for high-impact teams

    What is the top requirement for high-impact teams? When I was recently asked this question, I started making a list.

  • OpenShift Commons Briefing: OpenShift Origin 3.10 Release Update with Derek Carr and Mike Barrett (Red Hat)

    In this briefing, Red Hat’s Derek Carr and Mike Barrett walk us thru what’s new in OpenShift Origin Release 3.10

  • OpenShift Commons Briefing: IoT Edge Deployments on OpenShift with RHEL – Luca Gabella (Red Hat)

    In this briefing, Red Hat’s Alessandro Arrichiello, Luca Bigotta and Luca Gabella (Red Hat) walk us thru leveraging containers  for IoT Edge Deployments: in this scenario and discuss how developers are using OpenShift  to build Edge Applications. Then they walked us thru  a real use case scenario how developers can leverage OpenShift features for enabling Hybrid deployments on standalone Red Hat Enterprise Linux. In the demonstration, they also show using OpenShift’s Ansible Service Broker for automating the external deployment, and talked about using Ansible Tower when large scale ones will be needed.

  • Red Hat Inc. (RHT) Dips 3.16% for July 30
  • Stock Under Review: Red Hat (NYSE: RHT)
  • Are Investors need vacation from Autodesk, Inc. (ADSK) and Red Hat, Inc. (RHT)?

Istio 1.0

Filed under
Server
  • IBM & Google Launch 'Istio' Cloud Software, but Amazon & Microsoft Skip the Party

    Istio, an open source project backed by IBM, Google, Red Hat and others for connecting, managing and securing Kubernetes containers, hits version 1.0 Tuesday. But can Istio become ubiquitous without support from market leaders Amazon Web Services and Microsoft?

    Istio, also backed by Lyft Inc. and Pivotal , is a "service mesh," picking up where Kubernetes leaves off. Kubernetes provides orchestration to run multiple containers, manage their lifecycle, keep them available and scale them up and down as needed. Istio is software for managing how containers interact with each other.

  • The Istio service mesh hits version 1.0
  • What is Istio? The latest open source project out of Google
  • Istio sets sail as Red Hat renovates OpenShift container ship

    Red Hat is celebrating the 1.0 release of Istio, the open source microservices management project, and the arrival of version 3.10 of its OpenShift software container platform.

    Istio's 1.0 release received mention at Google Cloud Next last week, but the official bits are expected on Tuesday. The software serves as a management mechanism for distributed microservices, providing capabilities like traffic management, service identity and security, policy enforcement and telemetry among apps running across multiple Kubernetes clusters and hosts.

  • IBM, Google, Red Hat push Istio to 1.0 release

    IBM launched Istio along with Google Cloud and Lyft a little more than a year ago. The goal of Istio is to give developers a vendor-neutral way to connect, secure and manage networks of various microservices.

    Managing microservices is a critical issue since enterprises are increasingly built on them. By breaking services and applications into smaller parts developers can be more agile. The issue is that managing various microservices requires a good bit of choreography.

Google’s Edge TPU AI chip will run on a USB stick computer

Filed under
Android
Linux

Google followed up on its Edge TPU machine learning chip announcement by unveiling a USB Type-C based version that you can plug into any Linux or Android Things computer, including a Raspberry Pi. There are also new details on the Edge TPU dev board.

Following Google’s announcement of an embedded friendly Edge TPU version of its Tensor Processing Unit AI chip and the related Cloud IoT Edge stack for IoT gateways, the company announced a USB stick computer version of Edge TPU that can work with any Linux or Android Things computer. It also posted more details on the upcoming, NXP-based Edge TPU development kit, including its SoC: an NXP i.MX8M.

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UK's National Cyber Security Centre Give Advice on Securing Ubuntu 18.04 LTS

Filed under
Security
Ubuntu

Dubbed Bionic Beaver, the Ubuntu 18.04 LTS operating system was launched in April 2018 as the latest release of Canonical's popular Ubuntu Linux OS, and it's a long-term support release that will receive security and software updates for the next five years, until April 2023. The Ubuntu 18.04.1 LTS point release is also available for download and includes all the latest security updates.

Being based on the Linux kernel, Ubuntu is already a secure computer operating system compared to Windows or macOS, but if you're living in the UK (United Kingdom) and you need to configure your Ubuntu 18.04 LTS installations for maximum security, the National Cyber Security Centre tells you how.

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KDE Plasma 5.13.4 Desktop Environment Released with More Than 45 Improvements

Filed under
KDE

Coming almost three weeks after the KDE Plasma 5.13.3 release, the KDE Plasma 5.13.4 maintenance update continues to improve the stability and performance of the KDE Plasma 5.13 desktop environment by adding total of 48 changes and bug fixes across various components, including the Plasma Desktop, Plasma Discover, Plasma Workstation, KScreen, KWin, Plasma Add-ons, Info Center, Breeze Plymouth, and others.

"Today KDE releases a Bugfix update to KDE Plasma 5, versioned 5.13.4. Plasma 5.13 was released in June with many feature refinements and new modules to complete the desktop experience. This release adds two week's worth of new translations and fixes from KDE's contributors. The bugfixes are typically small but important," reads today's announcement.

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Story of GNOME Shell Extensions

Filed under
GNOME

A long time ago (exactly 10 years ago) it was decided that the the shell for GNOME would be written in JavaScript. GNOME 3 was still looking for its new face, a lot of UI experimentation was taking place, and JavaScript looked like the best candidate for it. Moreover it was a popular language on the web, so barriers to entry for new contributors would be significantly lowered.

When you have the shell written in JavaScript you can very easily patch it and alter its look and behaviour. And that’s what people started doing. Upstream was not very keen to officially support extensions due to their nature: they’re just hot patching the GNOME Shell code. They have virtually unlimited possibilities in changing look and behaviour, but also in introducing instability.

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More in Tux Machines

Programming/Development: C++, Go, Mozilla/Firefox and Python

  • Deliverable 1 : [✓]
    Seems okay, far better than the initial results. Although I should say, I deviated from what I thought I would need to write. First I assumed that I don’t have to write another boost::graph wrapper for KisPaintDevice, but I had to. That was one heck of an experience. In one of the last few posts, I ranted on Dmitry’s interpretation of the Graph, turns out we were on the same page but I understood his explanation the wrong way. I should put more attention to details from now on I guess. All the pixels are connected to each other, but they only have an edge between them if they are adjacent. If in center, the out degree would be 8, if in corners, 3 and if in edges, 5. There are some other cases too, but I will leave them for the moment. While writing the wrapper, I also got to know some of the cool features and techniques of C++, which I will be writing posts on as soon as I get some time, concepts, traits, avoiding virtual functions and what not. It is commendable that how boost approaches boost::astar_search, there is not a single virtual function, you don’t have to inherit anything (you can though for safety), just templates and traits, you are done.
  • Go Creeping In
    I’ve seen the inside of the Google and Amazon tech stacks. There are common threads that run through them and also, I bet, through most BigTechCos. Here and there down the stack is a lot of C++ and vestigial remnants from earlier days, Perl or PHP or whatever. Out in front of humans, of course, JS. But in between, there are oceans and oceans of Java; to a remarkable degree, it runs the Internet. Except for, here and there, you find a small but steadily increasing proportion of Go.
  • Stand by for FPR14 SPR1 chemspill
    Mozilla has shipped a fix for MFSA2019-18 in Firefox 67.0.3 and 60.7.1. This exploit has been detected in the wild, and while my analysis indicates it would require a PowerPC-specific attack to be exploitable in official TenFourFox builds (the Intel versions may be directly exploited, however), it could probably cause drive-by crashes and we should therefore ship an urgent fix as well. The chemspill is currently undergoing confidence tests and I'm shooting to release builds before the weekend. For builders, the only change in FPR14 SPR1 is the patch for bug 1544386, which I will be pushing to the repo just as soon as I have confirmed the fix causes no regressions.
  • PyPI Now Supports Two-Factor Login via WebAuthn
  • Understanding Python assignment
  • How to Publish Your Own Python Package to PyPI
  • PyCoder’s Weekly: Issue #373 (June 18, 2019)
  • EuroPython 2019: Community Discounts
  • EuroPython 2019: Inviting European Python Conference Organizers

today's howtos

All Linux, all the time: Supercomputers Top 500

Starting at the top, two IBM-built supercomputers, Summit and Sierra, at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Tennessee and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in California, respectively to the bottom -- a Lenovo Xeon-powered box in China -- all of them run Linux. Linux supports more hardware architectures than any other operating system. In supercomputers, it supports both clusters, such as Summit and Sierra, the most common architecture, and Massively Parallel Processing (MPP), which is used by the number three computer Sunway TaihuLight. When it comes to high-performance computing (HPC), Intel dominates the TOP500 by providing processing power to 95.6% of all systems included on the list. That said, IBM's POWER powers the fastest supercomputers. One supercomputer works its high-speed magic with Arm processors: Sandia Labs' Astra, an HPE design, which uses over 130-thousand Cavium ThunderX2 cores. And, what do all these processors run? Linux, of course. . 133 systems of the Top 500 supercomputers are using either accelerator or co-processor setups. Of these most are using Nvidia GPUs. And, once more, it's Linux conducting the hardware in a symphony of speed. Read more

Red Hat and SUSE Leftovers

  • Are DevOps certifications valuable? 10 pros and cons
  • Kubernetes 1.15: Enabling the Workloads
    The last mile for any enterprise IT system is the application. In order to enable those applications to function properly, an entire ecosystem of services, APIs, databases and edge servers must exist. As Carl Sagan once said, “If you wish to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first invent the universe.” To create that IT universe, however, we must have control over its elements. In the Kubernetes universe, the individual solar systems and planets are now Operators, and the fundamental laws of that universe have solidified to the point where civilizations can grow and take root. Discarding the metaphor, we can see this in the introduction of Object Count Quota Support For Custom Resources. In English, this enables administrators to count and limit the number of Kubernetes resources across the broader ecosystem in a given cluster. This means services like Knative, Istio, and even Operators like the CrunchyData PostgreSQL Operator, the MongoDB Operator or the Redis Operator can be controlled via quota using the same mechanisms that standard Kubernetes resources have enjoyed for many releases. That’s great for developers, who can now be limited by certain expectations. It would not benefit the cluster for a bad bit of code to create 30 new PostgreSQL clusters because someone forgot to add a “;” at the end of a line. Call them “guardrails” that protect against unbounded object growth in your etcd database.
  • Red Hat named HPE’s Partner of the Year at HPE Discover 2019
    For more than 19 years, Red Hat has collaborated with HPE to develop, deliver and support trusted solutions that can create value and fuel transformation for customers. Our work together has grown over these nearly two decades and our solutions now include Linux, containers and telecommunications technologies, to name just a few. As a testament to our collaboration, HPE has named Red Hat the Technology Partner of the Year 2019 for Hybrid Cloud Solutions.
  • Demystifying Containers – Part II: Container Runtimes
    This series of blog posts and corresponding talks aims to provide you with a pragmatic view on containers from a historic perspective. Together we will discover modern cloud architectures layer by layer, which means we will start at the Linux Kernel level and end up at writing our own secure cloud native applications. Simple examples paired with the historic background will guide you from the beginning with a minimal Linux environment up to crafting secure containers, which fit perfectly into todays’ and futures’ orchestration world. In the end it should be much easier to understand how features within the Linux kernel, container tools, runtimes, software defined networks and orchestration software like Kubernetes are designed and how they work under the hood.
  • Edge > Core > Cloud: Transform the Way You Want
    For more than 25 years, SUSE has been very successful in delivering enterprise-grade Linux to our customers. And as IT infrastructure has shifted and evolved, so have we. For instance, we enabled and supported the move to software-defined data centers as virtualization and containerization technologies became more prevalent and data growth demanded a new approach.
  • SUSE OpenStack Cloud Technology Preview Takes Flight
    We are pleased to announce that as of today we are making a technology preview of a containerized version of SUSE OpenStack Cloud available that will demonstrate a future direction for our product. The lifecycle management for this technology preview is based on an upstream OpenStack project called Airship, which SUSE has been using and contributing to for some time. This follows our open / open policy of upstream first and community involvement.