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April 2019

Fedora 30 Performance Is Moving In The Right Direction But A Lot Of Untapped Potential

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Yesterday we began with our preliminary performance benchmarks of Fedora 30. From those results Intel Core i9 and AMD Threadripper systems and what we're seeing on other systems in the labs, Fedora 30 indeed is coming out generally slightly faster than Fedora 29 when looking at the performance overall. In some cases the performance is much better thanks to GCC 9 and other upgrades, but overall it's a small, modest performance improvement. While that's better than seeing Fedora 30 running slower than its predecessor, there still is more potential to squeeze out of the system.

With the Intel Core i9 7980XE system as a high-performance reference system, here are some additional data points comparing those Fedora 29 and Fedora 30 results to Ubuntu 19.04, openSUSE Tumbleweed (with its GNOME desktop option, to match the other operating systems tested), and Clear Linux for seeing how those distributions compete with the new Fedora Linux.

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Android 9 Pie OS for Raspberry Pi 3 Gets Yalp Store and Evie Launcher

Filed under
Android
Linux

The RaspAnd Pie Build 190429 is here a month and a half after the first release that brought Google's latest Android 9 Pie mobile operating system to the tiny Raspberry Pi computers, which, unfortunately, did not ship with Google Play Store, though you could install Android apps via the Aptoide package manager.

The new release adds Yalp Store, a replacement for Google Play store that lets you install Android apps directly from Google Play Store in the APK file format. You don't even need to have a Google account to install Android apps, except if you want to install paid apps or access your owned apps or write reviews.

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Leftovers: Debian, Kubuntu, RcppArmadillo and VolksPC OS

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Debian
Ubuntu
  • Debian 9.9 KDE Run Through

    In this video, we look at Debian 9.9, the KDE edition. Enjoy! For links and more, look here: https://www.linuxmadesimple.info/2019/04/debian-990-kde.html Background Music: 1973 by Bruno E.

  • Kubuntu 19.04 overview | Making your PC friendly

    In this video, I am going to show an overview of Kubuntu 19.04 and some of the applications pre-installed.

  • Dirk Eddelbuettel: RcppArmadillo 0.9.400.2.0

    A new RcppArmadillo release based on the very recent Armadillo upstream release arrived on CRAN earlier today, and will get to Debian shortly.

    Armadillo is a powerful and expressive C++ template library for linear algebra aiming towards a good balance between speed and ease of use with a syntax deliberately close to a Matlab. RcppArmadillo integrates this library with the R environment and language–and is widely used by (currently) 587 other packages on CRAN.

  • The Best of Both Worlds

    Linux desktop users can now use an estimated two million Android apps that were previously unavailable on Linux with VolksPC OS.

    Open source enthusiasts have spent years waiting for the Linux desktop revolution. The Linux environment now supports hundreds of useful, stable, and secure desktop tools that are available for no cost, but Linux still has not displaced Windows or macOS in the race for desktop marketshare.

    Android, however, which uses the Linux kernel, has actually become mainstream and is competing quite well. In fact, if you combine desktop, laptop, tablet, and mobile usage, Android has reached 38 percent of marketshare, narrowly overtaking Windows as the most popular operating system in the world.

Audio: Linux Journal and Linux Voice Introduction

Filed under
Interviews
  • Episode 18: KidOYO

    Doc Searls talks to Zhen, Devon and Melora Lofretto of KidOYO and Doctor Michael Nagler, superintendent of the Mineola Public School system in Mineola  Long Island.

  • Linux Voice Introduction

    Today's computer magazines talk about big ideas and new age concepts, like containers, cloud computing, and software-defined infrastructure, but we at Linux Voice know that one of the reasons you own you computer in the first place is to take care of everyday tasks more efficiently and without the clutter.

    Linux is home to dozens of useful tools for taking notes and managing to-do lists. This month we feature Joplin, a powerful open source note-taking app that organizes your notes in a searchable form and even supports synchronization with several popular cloud platforms. We also investigate the Unforeseen Incidents point-and-click mystery game, and our tutorial series continues with a look at Bash math functions and more on designing 3D objects with OpenSCAD.

Servers: Kubernetes, Red Hat, OpenStack, Indie Web Server and More

Filed under
Server
  • Rancher Labs Adds OS Optimized for Kubernetes

    Rancher Labs has made available a beta release of a lightweight operating system on which it envisions IT organizations will deploy its previously announced lightweight instance of Kubernetes dubbed k3s.

    Company CEO Sheng Liang says the main goal is to make it more convenient for IT organizations to use the same set of tools to deploy an instance of Kubernetes along with a k3OS operating system based on the open source Ubuntu kernel. Rancher Labs doesn’t envision IT organizations replacing instances of Linux that have already been deployed in with K3OS, but in circumstances where there has been no operating system standard set, k3OS should provide a more frictionless deployment option, he says.

    In fact, Liang notes the ability to deploy and update Kubernetes and the operating system it runs on from within the same user interface to access a common set of YAML files should be especially appealing to IT organizations that have embraced best DevOps processes to deliver ongoing rolling upgrades to their IT environments.

  • Manage your APIs deployed with Istio service mesh

    And, as explained in “Distributed microservices architecture: Istio, managed API gateways and, enterprise integration”, a service mesh does not relieve the need for an API management solution. A service mesh manages services and the connections between them, whereas an API management solution manages APIs and their consumers. In this article, I’ll describe how to manage APIs using the Red Hat Integration adapter for Istio.

    Red Hat Integration offers an API management capability that let companies build an ecosystem of consumers around their APIs and then drive new revenue from them.

  • MySQL on OpenShift Container Storage performance and failover under heavy load
  • OpenStack Looks to Help Define the Future of Open Infrastructure

    The OpenStack Foundation is continuing to grow its open-source efforts, including confirming new top-level projects and expanding its Ironic bare metal program, as part of the kickoff for the Open Infrastructure Summit.

    The Kata Containers secure container effort and the Zuul Continuous Integration/Continuous Deployment (CI/CD) projects have now been confirmed as top-level projects at the OpenStack Foundation, joining the group's namesake OpenStack cloud. While not yet a top-level project, the Airship lifecycle management project is also celebrating a major milestone with its 1.0 release.

    Additionally, the OpenStack Foundation is promoting its Ironic bare metal program as a way for organizations to deploy cloud resources on physical hardware.

  • Indie Web Server 9.1.0: Better error handling
  • Most Used CLI Based Linux Network Management Tools

    If you are a system administrators or a network administrators then you must be aware of all the commands that we are going to mention in this post.

    Even if you don’t know or you are newbie in system admin domain than this post is for you.Let’s see some of the most used command line based tools for network management in Linux.

  • Docker Security Breach Affects Devops Pipelines

    Docker security took a hit last week -- right before its annual developer and customer event -- with the news that a database in its Docker Hub repository for container images had been hacked.

KDE/Qt: Qt 5.13 Plan, Kdenlive and Craft

Filed under
KDE
  • Qt 5.13 Will Still Try To Ship In May

    The third beta of the Qt 5.13 tool-kit is now available for testing as the developers try to get this update ready to ship as stable in May. 

    Jani Heikkinen of The Qt Company announced this third beta today. A fourth beta is expected as they are still working to update from OpenSSL 1.0 to 1.1 this cycle. Following that, a release candidate will come once their blocker bugs are addressed. As of writing, there are just nine blocker bugs at present ranging from Android crashes to pulling in new Chrome patches to WebAssembly issues.

  • FOSSPicks

    Kdenlive is one of those applications that catches you by surprise. One minute it seems little more than a quick Qt-built GUI wrapped around some command-line tools to concatenate video files, and the next minute it's spending months on hiatus being rewritten and refactored into something that can genuinely start to compete with Final Cut Pro on macOS. This is what's happening with Kdenlive; you'll find the all new version in the KDE Applications 19.04 release. To be fair, it already was the best open source video editor available, barring perhaps Blender if you needed absolute power and had the patience to master its idiosyncratic user interface.

    Many who have perhaps not used Kdenlive for a while won't realize that it now includes some rather advanced features. One, for example, allows you to use low quality copies of a clip as proxies for edits you want to make. This saves CPU and storage resources and is perfect for our 8K future. There's also a brilliant Title Editor toolbar that enables you to create 2D text frames without having to resort to an external package. This important function is always overlooked in open source video editors, as they often focus on performance and clip editing. However, adding titles is equally important. You only have to look at the most popular YouTube videos to see how words, spacing, shadows, gradients, and images are spliced into video segments to create a professional and snappy video. Dropping an alpha-blended Gimp text render doesn't really cut it, unless you're creating a video about Gimp. Kdenlive has done all this for some time, which has perhaps been our only criticism: It was difficult to see where new developments were taking the project.

  • Craft: Platforms and Compiler

    While my last post was still about the new cache and which compilers we should support, the pre built binaries for Craft (the cache) are now 2 years old. They are used for continues integration and to speed up user builds.

    We now provide binaries for Windows, MacOS and Linux.

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • $2.4 Million in Prizes for Schools Teaching Ethics Alongside Computer Science

    Today, we are announcing the first winners of the Responsible Computer Science Challenge. We’re awarding $2.4 million to 17 initiatives that integrate ethics into undergraduate computer science courses.

    The winners’ proposed curricula are novel: They include in-class role-playing games to explore the impact of technology on society. They embed philosophy experts and social scientists in computer science classes. They feature “red teams” that probe students’ projects for possible negative societal impacts. And they have computer science students partner with local nonprofits and government agencies.

    The winners will receive awards of up to $150,000, and they span the following categories: public university, private university, liberal arts college, community college, and Jesuit university. Stage 1 winners are located across 13 states, with computer science programs ranging in size from 87 students to 3,650 students.

    The Responsible Computer Science Challenge is an ambitious initiative by Omidyar Network, Mozilla, Schmidt Futures, and Craig Newmark Philanthropies. It aims to integrate ethics and responsibility into undergraduate computer science curricula and pedagogy at U.S. colleges and universities.

  • Firefox 67 new contributors

    With the release of Firefox 67, we are pleased to welcome the 75 developers who contributed their first code change to Firefox in this release, 66 of whom were brand new volunteers!

  • Confronting linguistic bias: The case for an open human language

    Open source—that is, making the code of digital tools and datasets accessible to anyone—is a popular approach to improving the methodological transparency of this work in educational organizations. The field's broader open access movement stresses skepticism about the proprietary nature of algorithms, data, and code involved in humanistic research more generally—and cautions researchers about the impact that ownership can have on the research process itself.

    This perspective has tremendous implications for the way we think about the embedded biases and assumptions in humanistic research. What if we subjected our human languages to the same rigorous assessment we do with our computational languages? What biases might we discover in them? How might those biases impact our scholarship?

  • ONLYOFFICE – document collaboration via blockchain and encryption

    Earlier in 2019 ONLYOFFICE announced the release of the end-to-end document encryption reinforced by blockchain. The new technology is available as a developer preview in the new version of ONLYOFFICE Desktop Editors.

    ONLYOFFICE is a project developed by Ascensio System SIA, with its in Riga (Latvia). Ascensio Systems designed OONLY OFFICE for internal team collaboration. However, an attempt to introduce it to a wider audience proved successful. In consequence, it revised and expanded functionality which has attracted use by more than 5M people (according to Ascensio Systems).

    [...]

    ONLYOFFICE Desktop Editors is a free open-source office suite which comprises editors for documents, spreadsheets and presentations working offline. The suite also provides users with quick access to collaborative features.

  • LibreOffice monthly recap: April 2019

    Check out our regular summary of events and updates in the last month!

GNU and GPL Picks

Filed under
GNU
Legal
  • The decade long wait for Bash 5

    It's a coincidence that the Linux kernel and Bash jumped to version 5.0 at about the same time. While Linus assigns the numbers as he sees fit, Bash changes its version when major adjustments are made. Here's what users can expect in Bash 5.

    My last article about a Bash version change is 10 years old [1]. Version 4 was in the starting blocks at that time, but it took some time for all distributions to switch to this version. Nobody puts their production system at risk without good reason.

    Nevertheless, the change was very attractive for developers of complex scripts, because – thanks to associative arrays – a completely new data structure was introduced. The advantages were more elegant, simpler programs that were also easier to maintain. Other important changes included the coproc command (which supports parallelization) and redirection operators.

  • Stack Clash mitigation in GCC: Why -fstack-check is not the answer

    In our previous article about Stack Clash, we covered the basics of the Stack Clash vulnerability. To summarize, an attacker first uses various means to bring the heap and stack close together. A large stack allocation is then used to “jump the stack guard.” Subsequent stores into the stack may modify objects in the heap or vice versa. This, in turn, can be used by attackers to gain control over applications.

  • Cooperation and freedom for all

    The GPL's "freedom zero" can be applied to more than just open-source software.

    Recently, a discussion came up on one of the mailing lists for a GNU/Linux distribution, on which I feel it is necessary to comment. Because this discussion has a place in world politics today, I am bringing my input to this column.

    I started working for Digital Equipment Corporation (DEC) in 1983. At that time, I had traveled only domestically in the USA, never internationally.

  • Software Freedom Conservancy Announces End to VMware Lawsuit

    Linux developer Christoph Hellwig has announced that he is discontinuing his lawsuit against VMware for non-compliance with the terms of the GPL. Hellwig and the Software Freedom Conservancy accused VMware of including GPLed code associated with vmklinux into VMware's proprietary vSphere product. A German appeals court dismissed the case on February 28. Hellwig and the Software Freedom Conservancy have decided they will not appeal the case further in German courts.

Programming: Microsoft Yardsticks, Crypto Puzzle, Go and Python

Filed under
Development
  • The 7 Most Popular Programming Languages on GitHub in 2019 [ED: Stop treating Microsoft like everything that isn't controlled by it does not exist. And delete GitHub to discourage this kind of lying lunacy.]
  • A Programmer Solved a 20-Year-Old, Forgotten Crypto Puzzle

    Organizations impacted by breach, which gave attackers illegal access to a database containing sensitive account information, need to check their container images.
    The owners of some 190,000 Docker accounts will need to change their passwords and verify their container images haven't been tampered with as the result of a recent intrusion into a Docker Hub database.

    Docker discovered the unauthorized access on April 25. It said it had already notified impacted users about the incident and sent them a password-reset link.

    The company said it had also unlinked Docker Hub from GitHub and Bitbucket for those using these external repositories to automatically build — or autobuild — container images. Such users will need to relink their Docker Hub accounts to these repositories in order for autobuild to work properly.

  • Screen scraping with Colly in Go

    The Colly scraper helps developers who work with the Go programming language to collect data off the web. Mike Schilli illustrates the capabilities of this powerful tool with a few practical examples.

    As long as there are websites to view for the masses of browser customers on the web, there will also be individuals on the consumer side who want the data in a different format and write scraper scripts to automatically extract the data to fit their needs.

  • Overlaying Debug Data onto Wing Pro 7's Editor

    Wing 7 has been released, so in this issue of Wing Tips we take a look at one of the new debugger features in Wing Pro 7: The ability to press and hold Shift-Space to display the value of all visible symbols, using an overlay on top of the editor.

  • HOW TO GET STARTED WITH “Machine Learning”

    If you ever heard of terms like Machine Learning, Artificial Intelligence or Data Science, you may be fascinating that What are these things and how to get started.

  • Python 3.7.3 : Fix kivy python module installation.
  • Teaching a kid to code with Pygame Zero

    How can you excite a kid about coding and computers? As a software developer and father of two children, I think about this question often. A person with software skills can have big advantages in our modern world, so I’d like to equip my kids for their future.

    In my home, we play video games together. My children (aged six and four) watch me play through many classics like Super Mario World and The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past. They like spending that time with daddy and are really engaged with the video game. When I considered how my six year old son might enjoy coding, using video games as the channel into computing was a very natural idea.

More in Tux Machines

Best Open Source Slack Alternatives for Team Communication

You are here: Home / List / Best Open Source Slack Alternatives for Team Communication Best Open Source Slack Alternatives for Team Communication Last updated February 25, 2020 By Ankush Das Leave a Comment Brief: Here, we shall take a look at the best open source slack alternatives that you can choose to communicate with your team at work. Slack is one of the most popular team communication services for work. Some may call it a glorified IRC but that doesn’t impact its popularity. It is available for free with additional features offered in its paid plans. Though Slack can be installed on Linux thanks to an Electron app but it is not open source, neither the client nor the server. In this article, I’ll list a few open source Slack alternatives that you can try. Read more

Dual-Boot GNU/Linux and Android

  • Planet Computers' clamshell phone can dual-boot Android and Linux

    Planet Computers' laptop-like Cosmo Communicator phone just became that much more useful to its audience of very particular power users. The Cosmo now supports a promised multi-boot function, letting you run Android (both regular and rooted), Debian Linux and TWRP on the same device without one replacing the other. You'll have to partition your storage and know your way around a boot menu, but this will give you a way to run Linux apps or otherwise experiment with your phone. You won't lose over-the-air updates for Android by installing Linux, Planet Computers said. The multi-boot firmware is available for free, and there are instructions for installing Debian and other software. This still isn't for the faint-hearted. However, it also represents one of the few instances where a phone maker has officially enabled support for operating systems besides the one that ships with the device. The Cosmo is also fairly well-suited to Linux thanks to its keyboard -- you won't have to jump through hoops to use the command line.

  • How can IT manage Android Things devices in the enterprise?

    Recent versions of Google's Android OS support a wider range of devices via the Android Things program's APIs and managing some of the newer devices can seem complicated at first. Thankfully, the underlying OS is essentially the same on all Android devices, so the EMM platform management and enrollment processes are usually similar for Android Things devices. The challenge for mobile admins is to develop a version of Android -- using the Android SDK and Android Things APIs -- that functions on these dedicated devices.

Update on Linux support: creation of a CERN Linux community forum

For those, a CERN Linux community forum has been created. Users will be able to post issues that they encounter when using non-CERN-supported Linux distributions and to post solutions. Users are also encouraged to post articles with comments and ideas that could help make this forum more dynamic and useful to them. Various methods for printing and using AFS, SSH, ROOT and other tools at CERN can be found on the internet. The CERN Linux community forum aims to collect these methods, as well as new ones that may be created directly in it. Read more

Python Programming

  • Introduction to Python SQL Libraries

    All software applications interact with data, most commonly through a database management system (DBMS). Some programming languages come with modules that you can use to interact with a DBMS, while others require the use of third-party packages. In this tutorial, you’ll explore the different Python SQL libraries that you can use. You’ll develop a straightforward application to interact with SQLite, MySQL, and PostgreSQL databases.

  • Introduction to Image Processing in Python with OpenCV

    In this tutorial, we are going to learn how we can perform image processing using the Python language. We are not going to restrict ourselves to a single library or framework; however, there is one that we will be using the most frequently, the Open CV library. We will start off by talking a little about image processing and then we will move on to see different applications/scenarios where image processing can come in handy. So, let's begin!

  • Talking to API's and goodlooking tools

    One of my go-to locations for security news had a thread recently about a tool called VTScan. I really liked the idea of not having to go through the browser overhead to check files against multiple scan engines. Although the tool (which is itself a basic vt-cli spinoff) already existed, I was looking for a new challenge, I decided to roll my own and add a few cool features! I'll have a thorough look at how python talks to API's with requests and I look at turning all this API data into a nice GUI application with click. I hope to give you some idea's for CLI styling in the future so I can see more awesome tools by you all!

  • From a rejected Pycon talk to a new project.

    Like many others, my talk proposal (early draft here) for Pycon US was rejected. So, I decided to spend some time putting everything in a new project instead. (Documentation here.) It is still a rough draft, but usable ... and since I've mentioned it in a few other places, I thought I should mention it here as well.