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October 2019

Debian Leftovers

Filed under
Debian
  • Jonathan McDowell: Life with a Yubikey

    At the past two DebConfs Thomas Goirand of infomaniak has run a workshop on using a Yubikey, and been generous enough to provide a number of devices for Debian folk. Last year I was fortunate enough to get hold of one of the devices on offer.

    My primary use for the device is to hold my PGP key. Generally my OpenPGP hardware token of choice is the Gnuk, which features a completely Free software stack and an open hardware design, but the commonly available devices suffer from being a bit more fragile than I’d like to regularly carry around with me. The Yubikey has a much more robust design, being a slim plastic encapsulated device. I finally set it up properly with my PGP key last November, and while I haven’t attached it to my keyring I’ve been carrying it with me regularly.

  • Chris Lamb: Free software activities in September 2019

    Attended the launch event of OpenUK, a new organisation with the purpose of supporting the growth of free software, hardware and data. It was hosted at the House of Commons of the United Kingdom and turned out to be quite the night to be attending Parliament.

    As part of my duties of being on the board of directors of the Open Source Initiative and Software in the Public Interest I attended their respective monthly meetings and participated in various licensing and other discussions occurring on the internet, as well as the usual internal discussions regaring logistics, policy etc.

  • Jonathan Carter: Free Software Activities (2019-09)

    It’s been a busy month on a personal level so there’s a bunch of my Debian projects that have been stagnant this month, I hope to fix that over October/November.

  • TeX Live/Debian updates 20190930

    TeX Live 2019 has seen already many updates since the initial upload to Debian, most of which I have never reported about. Today I have uploaded a new set of packages, based on the tlnet archives of 20190930.

  • Ben Hutchings: Kernel Recipes 2019, part 1

    This conference only has a single track, so I attended almost all the talks. All of them were recorded and videos should be available soon. This time I didn't take notes but I've summarised all the talks I attended.

  • Sylvain Beucler: Debian LTS and ELTS - September 2019

    Here is my transparent report for my work on the Debian Long Term Support (LTS) and Debian Extended Long Term Support (ELTS), which extend the security support for past Debian releases, as a paid contributor.

    In September, the monthly sponsored hours were split evenly among contributors depending on their max availability - I was assigned 23.75h for LTS (out of 30 max) and 20h for ELTS (max).

    I was again able to factor out some time between LTS and ELTS.

    The qemu update required more testing than I expected, as it's used with lots of different CPU and disk backends.

  • Russ Allbery: Haul post

    It's been quite a while since I made one of these, and I... may have been supporting a lot of authors financially despite my huge to-read pile.

Audiocasts/Shows: Linux in the Ham Shack, Linux Headlines and More

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • LHS Episode #304: Cloudlog Deep Dive

    Hello and welcome to the 304th installment of Linux in the Ham Shack. In this episode, the hosts take an in-depth look at the Cloudlog amateur radio logger. Leveraging Web server technology with PHP, hamlib for rig access and connectivity to the major online logging services like LoTW and eQSL, Cloudlog creates a distributed logging infrastructure for keeping all your QSLs properly organized. Join us as we explore the past, present and future of Cloudlog.

  • 09/30/2019 | Linux Headlines

    Oracle is one step closer to winning its settlement against Google, Exim has another critical flaw, and more details about the checkm8 iOS exploit reveal that it is not as dire as previously reported.

  • Setting up your very own Cloud With Nextcloud on Linode
  • Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo: S12E25 – Wings

    This week we have been syncing Google Photos to a local server. We discuss the Ubuntu 19.10 beta release including the flavours, updates on 32-bit package commitments in Ubuntu, porting MATE to Wayland, and round up some community events.

    It’s Season 12 Episode 25 of the Ubuntu Podcast! Alan Pope, Mark Johnson and Martin Wimpress are connected and speaking to your brain.

Taking elements from XCOM and FTL, Galaxy Squad arrives on GOG with Linux support

Filed under
Gaming

Inspired by two games I absolutely adore, Galaxy Squad takes the node-based exploration and random events from FTL and adds in some turn-based XCOM-like combat.

It just today arrived on the DRM-free store GOG, with a Linux version. Curiously, Steam only has it for Windows so GOG got it first this time around which doesn't happen often at all. The developer of Galaxy Squad was open to a Linux version when asked about it last year, so it's great to see it happen.

Read more

Also: Start your week with a cheap game, a look over some sales going on right now

More in Tux Machines

Open Hardware/Modding With LineageOS and Arduino

  • Ham Radio Gets Brain Transplant | Hackaday

    Old radios didn’t have much in the way of smarts. But as digital synthesis became more common, radios often had as much digital electronics in them as RF circuits. The problem is that digital electronics get better and better every year, so what looked like high-tech one year is quaint the next. [IMSAI Guy] had an Icom IC-245 and decided to replace the digital electronics inside with — among other things — an Arduino.

  • My phone - November 2021

    My current phone is the Google Pixel 3a from 2019. It’s running the LineageOS operating system without the Open GApps stack (GApps is short for “Google Apps”). This means there’s no proprietary software or tracking from Google on the phone by default.

  • PiGlass V2 Embraces The New Raspberry Pi Zero 2 | Hackaday

    Well, that certainly didn’t take long. It’s been just about a month since the Raspberry Pi Zero 2 hit the market, and we’re already seeing folks revisit old projects to reap the benefits of the drop-in upgrade that provides five times the computational power in the same form factor. Take for example the PiGlass v2 that [Matt] has been working on. He originally put the Pi Zero wearable together back in 2018, and while it featured plenty of bells and whistles like a VuFine+ display, 5 MP camera, and bone conduction audio, the rather anemic hardware of the original Zero kept it from reaching its true potential.

October/November in KDE Itinerary

Since the last summary KDE Itinerary has been moving with big steps towards the upcoming 21.12 release, with work on individual transport modes, more convenient ticket access, trip editing, a new health certificate UI, better transfer handling and many more improvements.

New Features
Current ticket access A small but very convenient new addition is the “Current ticket” action, which immediately navigates you to the details page of the most current element on the itinerary. That comes in handy when having to show or scan your ticket and avoids having to find the right entry in the list in a rush. This action is now also accessible from jump list actions in the taskbar on Linux, or app shortcuts on Android. Combined with the easily accessible barcode scanmode mentioned last time it’s now just two clicks or taps to get ready for a ticket check. Read more

New Videos/Shows: Response to Alleged Trolls and Reviewers

today's howtos

  • How To Install AMD Radeon Driver on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS - idroot

    In this tutorial, we will show you how to install AMD Radeon Driver on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS. For those of you who didn’t know, Installing AMD Radeon drivers on the Ubuntu system is an easy task that can be done in less than a minute. Radeon driver is needed by your AMD Radeon Graphics GPU to function with better performance. Some Linux distributions offer the proprietary driver pre-packaged as part of its standard package repository making the entire AMD Radeon Linux Driver procedure extremely easy to follow. This article assumes you have at least basic knowledge of Linux, know how to use the shell, and most importantly, you host your site on your own VPS. The installation is quite simple and assumes you are running in the root account, if not you may need to add ‘sudo‘ to the commands to get root privileges. I will show you the step-by-step installation of the FreeOffice on Ubuntu 20.04 (Focal Fossa). You can follow the same instructions for Ubuntu 18.04, 16.04, and any other Debian-based distribution like Linux Mint.

  • What you need to know about disks and disk partitions in Linux – LinuxBSDos.com

    This is an update to A beginner’s guide to disks and disk partitions in Linux, which itself was an update to Guide to disks and disk partitions in Linux. It is intended to be an absolute beginner’s guide to understanding how disks and disk partitions are handled in Linux. This update adds info on NVMe SSDs. If you are migrating from Windows to Linux and are attempting to install any Linux distribution alongside Windows 10/11 on your computer, this article should come in handy. You’ll read about hard drive naming convention in Linux, how they are partitioned, partition tables, file systems and mount points. By the time you are through reading this, you should have a pretty good idea of what you are doing when installing your next Linux distribution on your laptop or desktop computer. An understanding of all the aspects concerning how a disk is referenced and partitioned will put you in a better position to troubleshoot installation and disk-related problems. Most of the highly technical terms associated with this subject have been omitted, so this should be an easy read.

  • How To Install PrestaShop on Debian 11 - idroot

    In this tutorial, we will show you how to install PrestaShop on Debian 11. For those of you who didn’t know, PrestaShop is a freemium, open-source e-commerce software. It lets you start your own online store with secure payments, multiple shipping methods, custom themes, and more. PrestaShop written in PHP is highly customizable, supports all the major payment services, is translated in many languages and localized for many countries, has a fully responsive design (both front and back-office), etc. This article assumes you have at least basic knowledge of Linux, know how to use the shell, and most importantly, you host your site on your own VPS. The installation is quite simple and assumes you are running in the root account, if not you may need to add ‘sudo‘ to the commands to get root privileges. I will show you through the step-by-step installation of PrestaShop e-commerce software on a Debian 11 (Bullseye).

  • How to Install Asterisk VoIP Server on Debian 11 | 10 - Linux Shout

    In this tutorial, we will discuss some of the steps and commands to install the Asterisk VoIP server on Debian 11 Bullseye or 10 Buster using the terminal to call over Android or iPhone using a local network.

  • How to install Docker-ce on Ubuntu 21.10 – NextGenTips

    In this tutorial am going to show you how you can install Docker-ce on Ubuntu 21.10. Docker is a set of platform as a service product that uses OS-level virtualization to deliver software in packages called containers. Containers are usually isolated from one another and bundled their own software libraries and configuration files, they can communicate with each other through well-defined channels. Docker makes it possible to get more apps running on the same old servers and also makes it easy to package and ship programs.

  • How to Uninstall Software On Ubuntu

    Regardless of the operating system you are using; there are multiple reasons why you might want to uninstall software. Maybe the software has become corrupted, and it doesn’t function the same as before, or your application is now virus-ridden, so uninstalling it is safe. There are times when you don’t use the software anymore, so you uninstall it to make space. We all know that Ubuntu and other Linux distros are different from the commonly used Windows. Users migrating from Windows to Ubuntu can find it hard navigating even the basic stuff. Uninstalling software can be tricky, so this article will help you understand the different ways you can bin software in Ubuntu.

  • How to Mount USB Drive on Linux

    We live in the modern age of technology where there are multiple important variables to keep track of. But arguably, the biggest variable today is “data”. With some maturing and emerging technologies, everything is being centered around the quantity and quality of data. Thus, gathering and protecting data has become paramount. These days, it’s quite common to see people carrying their data around at all times. Different devices and technologies are used for this purpose, including a certain device called USB (Universal Serial Bus). A USB is an electronic communication protocol (ECP) most commonly used for computer accessories and other small-end electronic devices, either for data transfer or power transfer. Although USBs are being phased out slowly due to technologies such as “Cloud Computing”, there is a sense of privacy and security with using USBs that you don’t get with other methods. Accessing USBs is straightforward. It is a plug-and-use device, so the stick only needs to be connected to your computer via a USB port. Usually, USBs mount themselves automatically to your system regardless of the operating system, but there are instances where there is a problem, and the USB refuses to connect. For such times, if you are using a Linux distro, it is best to use the Terminal and execute your way to mount the USB in your computer. This article will be guiding you on how exactly you can achieve this task. Although it is time-consuming, once you know how to mount a USB in Linux, you will feel lightened, and it will be easier for you to perform it the next time when needed. So follow these instructions to get a proper hang of it.

  • How do I change my homepage in WordPress?

    This brief tutorial explains how to change the homepage in WordPress. After reading this tutorial, you’ll learn the two common ways to define your website homepage by editing WordPress settings. This article also includes instructions to create a new page to set as a homepage or a posts page if you have not created a home page. All steps described in this tutorial include real screenshots and can be followed by any WordPress level user.

  • How do I Rename a Column in MySQL?

    MySQL is a popular database management system that provides the backbone for a huge portion of today’s internet. Developed and maintained by Oracle, MySQL is an open-source RDBMS (relational database management system) with a client-server model. It offers secure database storage, fast performance, and powerful features. This guide will showcase how to rename a column in MySQL.

  • What Are Environment Variables in Linux? Everything You Need to Know

    If you've been using Linux for a while, you may be wondering how to set certain parameters from the command line that can keep your settings across programs. Environment variables are how you do this. By the end, you'll have a deep understanding of what environment variables are, and how you can create such variables from the command line.

  • SysMonTask – SparkyLinux

    There is a new application available for Sparkers: SysMonTask