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October 2019

Plasma 5.17.2

Filed under
KDE

Today KDE releases a bugfix update to KDE Plasma 5, versioned 5.17.2. Plasma 5.17 was released in October 2019 with many feature refinements and new modules to complete the desktop experience.

This release adds a week's worth of new translations and fixes from KDE's contributors. The bugfixes are typically small but important and include...

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Also: KDE Plasma 5.17.2 Desktop Environment Brings More Than 25 Bug Fixes, Update Now

LTE-enabled IoT gateway runs Linux on i.MX8M Mini

Filed under
Linux

Eurotech announced a “ReliaGate 10-14” DIN-rail gateway that runs Linux and its ESF IoT stack on an i.MX8M Mini with 2x GbE, DP, isolated serial and DIO, WiFi/BT, optional LTE, and security features including anti-tamper.

The ReliaGate 10-14 “multi-service IoT edge gateway” is a follow-on to Eurotech’s ReliaGate 10-12 and earlier ReliaGate 10-11 gateways, both of which are powered by a Texas Instruments’ Cortex-A8 based Sitara AM3352 SoC. The 10-14 model is a much more substantial upgrade, starting with its more powerful, quad-core, Cortex-A53 i.MX8M Mini SoC. We have covererd plenty of modules and SBCs based on NXP’s Mini, but this is the first Mini-based embedded system we’ve seen.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Mir Working On A Mir-On-Wayland Nested Compositor Path, Broadcom DispmanX API Support

    In addition to Mir's other road-map items around replaceable renderers and hybrid graphics driver support, it also turns out the Canonical developers involved are working on expanding the graphics platform support.

    Longtime Mir developer Alan Griffiths of Canonical wrote a post on Tuesday about the graphics platform support. To date Mir has released support for the KMS/Mesa drivers, Mir-on-X11 as a development target, eglstream-kms platform coverage for NVIDIA's proprietary driver, and an Android target with libhybris going back to the original Ubuntu Touch / Mir days.

  • MoltenVK Picks Up Metal 3.0 Capabilities, More Vulkan Features On macOS

    The open-source MoltenVK is out with another new update based against the Vulkan 1.1.126 specification and allowing the Vulkan API to be used on Apple's macOS and iOS by mapping those calls to the underlying Metal graphics drivers.

    Tuesday's MoltenVK update brings support for VK_EXT_swapchain_colorspace / VK_EXT_hdr_metadata, support for Metal 3.0 driver capabilities, native texture swizzling support, support for compressed 3D images on macOS, additional color-space options support, Xcode 11.1 toolchain support, reduced memory usage in some scenarios along with memory leak fixes, and a variety of other Vulkan bits were tweaked or added for this Apple portability layer.

  • Balint Reczey: New tags on the block: update-excuse and friends!

    In Ubuntu’s development process new package versions don’t immediately get released, but they enter the -proposed pocket first, where they are built and tested. In addition to testing the package itself other packages are also tested together with the updated package, to make sure the update doesn’t break the other packages either.

    The packages in the -proposed pocket are listed on the update excuses page with their testing status. When a package is successfully built and all triggered tests passed the package can migrate to the release pocket, but when the builds or tests fail, the package is blocked from migration to preserve the quality of the release.

    Sometimes packages are stuck in -proposed for a longer period because the build or test failures can’t be solved quickly. In the past several people may have triaged the same problem without being able to easily share their observations, but from now on if you figured out something about what broke, please open a bug against the stuck package with your findings and mark the package with the update-excuse tag. The bug will be linked to from the update excuses page so the next person picking up the problem can continue from there. You can even leave a patch in the bug so a developer with upload rights can find it easily and upload it right away.

  • City of Johannesburg Refuses to Pay Ransom to [Attackers]

    Messages left by the [attackers] on compromised computers claimed all servers and data were “hacked.” They also claimed to have dozens of backdoors that gave them control over everything in the city. “We can shut off everything with a button,” the [attackers] said.

  • Boeing CEO Accused of Telling 'Half-truths' in 737 MAX Hearing

    The hearing, the highest-profile congressional scrutiny of commercial aviation safety in years, heaps pressure on a newly rejiggered Boeing senior management team fighting to repair trust with airline customers and passengers shaken by an eight-month safety ban on its 737 MAX following the crashes, which killed 346 people.

    "You have told me half-truths over and over again," Senator Tammy Duckworth told Muilenburg, questioning why the manufacturer did not disclose more details about MCAS's lack of safeguards. "You have not told us the whole truth and these families are suffering because of it."

    Duckworth said the pilots did not know enough about MCAS.

    "You set those pilots up for failure."

  • Security updates for Wednesday

    Security updates have been issued by Debian (imapfilter, libvncserver, and pam-python), Fedora (tcpdump), Mageia (file, graphviz, kernel, and php, pcre2), openSUSE (nfs-utils), Red Hat (heketi and samba), Scientific Linux (thunderbird), SUSE (libtomcrypt, php7, and runc), and Ubuntu (apport, libarchive, libidn2, samba, and whoopsie). 

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • foss-north 2020 is on

    The foss-north event due a few days ago got cancelled due to health issues, but I’m happy to announce that I’m back and that the planning for foss-north 2020 already is on.

  • The goldsmith and the chaos warrior: a typology of workers

    Notably, in some industries like IT or the Free & Open-Source software sub-industry, we have done a pretty good job at externalizing (for better or for worse) the software developers and designers’ todo list as “bug/issue trackers”, and their assignments may often be linear and fairly predictable, allowing them to be “goldsmiths”.

    [...]

    If you’re a chaos warrior, or you fit any of the goldsmith’s “exceptions” (or if you’re interested in the field of personal productivity in general), you’ll probably be interested in reading my next article (coming up this Friday!) on (re)building the best free & open-source “GTD” application out there (but before that, if you haven’t read it already, check out my previous article on “getting things done”).

  • LibreOffice and Google Summer of Code 2019: The results

    This year, LibreOffice was once again a mentoring organization in the Google Summer of Code (GSoC) a global programme focused on bringing more student developers into free and open source software development. We ran six projects – and all were finished successfully. Both students and mentors enjoyed the time, and here we present some of the achievements, which should make their way into LibreOffice 6.4 in early February!

  • Funding open source development may not be as complicated as you think

    While the world is awash in tens of millions of developers, virtually none of them regularly contribute to open source. Yes, most developers (68%) believe open source code is of higher quality than proprietary code (according to a TideLift survey) and, yes, virtually all developers (and their employers) end up using open source (according to a survey by The New Stack). Even so, according to the 2019 Stack Overflow survey, which polled over 85,000 developers, just 12.4% of the developers surveyed contribute to open source at least monthly; while another 23.1% contribute less than monthly but more than once each year, a whopping 64.4% either never contribute or do so less than once per year. 

Debian Developers' Leftovers

Filed under
Debian
  • Long-Range Radios: A Perfect Match for Unix Protocols From The 70s

    It seems I’ve been on a bit of a vintage computing kick lately. After connecting an original DEC vt420 to Linux and resurrecting some old operating systems, I dove into UUCP.

    In fact, it so happened that earlier in the week, my used copy of Managing UUCP & Usenet by none other than Tim O’Reilly arrived. I was reading about the challenges of networking in the 70s: half-duplex lines, slow transmission rates, and modems that had separate dialers. And then I stumbled upon long-distance radio. It turns out that a lot of modern long-distance radio has much in common with the challenges of communication in the 1970s – 1990s, and some of our old protocols might be particularly well-suited for it. Let me explain — I’ll start with the old software, and then talk about the really cool stuff going on in hardware (some radios that can send a signal for 10-20km or more with very little power!), and finally discuss how to bring it all together.

  • Ritesh Raj Sarraf: Comments on Hugo with Isso

    Oh! Boy. Finally been able to get something set up almost to my liking. After moving away from Drupal to Hugo, getting the commenting system in place was challenging. There were many solutions but I was adamant to what I wanted.

  • BITS from the DPL For September/October 2019

    I'm absolutely convinced we've reached a point where in order to respect the people trying to get work done, we need to figure out where we are as a project. We can either decide that this is work we want to facilitate, or work that we as a project decide is not important. If we choose to facilitate the work, then I can help. I can work with teams to help them get the resources they need to respond to concerns. The policy editors will likely be able to break some of their deadlocks. We'll never force people to engage in work they don't want to do. But those of us in leadership positions will benefit from understanding where the project wants to go.

Pop!_OS 19.10 is a wonder that makes me wonder

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Ubuntu

I make no bones about being a big fan of System76. Not only do they walk the open source walk, but their in-house hardware (the Thelio) might well be the single best desktop computer I have ever owned, and their laptops are high on the list. That hardware is made even more impressive with Pop!_OS running on top.

For those that aren't in the know, Pop!_OS is System76's in-house take on Linux. Built on a foundation of Ubuntu, the operating system includes a few tweaks, geared specifically toward System76 hardware. Those tweaks make Pop!_OS truly sing on the Thelio (it runs fine on non-System76 hardware as well).

Recently, in accordance with Ubuntu 19.10, System76 released the latest iteration of Pop!_OS, and I'm here to tell you that this release is truly a wonder…. One that makes me wonder.

Let me explain.

First I want to discuss what makes this new release so good.

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KDE Sets Out 3 Goals for the Future

Filed under
KDE

Announced this week, the KDE community has come together to map outs its development plans for the next few years.

The direction is neatly distilled on the KDE Goals mini-site, which provides a top-level overview on the areas of focus that those working on this free software project (and associated projects within its orbit) will keep in mind.

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Firefox 71 Enters Development with New Kiosk Mode, Picture-in-Picture on Windows

Filed under
Moz/FF

While Firefox 71 doesn't look like a big update, it brings a couple of interesting new features, such as a new kiosk mode that allow you to open the web browser directly in full-screen mode without any other distractions. This is mostly useful for companies who want to use on their kiosks, and can be enabled via the --kiosk command-line parameter.

Another interesting feature that will land as part of the upcoming Firefox 71 web browser is Picture-in-Picture (PiP) mode on Windows systems, which lets users pop a video out of its webpage into a floating window that can be resized and placed on top of all windows and in any part of your desktop.

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Intel Core i9 9900KS Linux Performance Benchmarks Review

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Today the Intel Core i9 9900KS is shipping at $513 USD for this specially-binned Coffeelake CPU that is capable of achieving a 5.0GHz all-core turbo frequency. The all-core 5.0GHz turbo is great, but it remains an eight-core / sixteen-thread 14nm processor going up against AMD's similarly priced Ryzen 9 3900X. Here are our initial benchmarks of the Core i9 9900KS compared to the Core i9 9900K and Ryzen 9 3900X.

The Intel Core i9 9900KS 8c/16t CPU features a 4.0GHz base frequency with 5.0GHz turbo frequency that can be sustained across all cores. The Core i9 9900KS does carry a 127 Watt TDP compared to 95 Watts with the i9-9900K, which has a lower base frequency of 3.6GHz and its 5.0GHz turbo rating is only for a single core. The price of the i9-9900KS is launching at $513 USD while the i9-9900K is now priced at around $449. The rest of the specifications align between the year-old Core i9 9900K and the new Core i9 9900KS.

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More in Tux Machines

Kernel and Graphics: Intel, AMD, and NVIDIA

  • Intel teases 'software-defined silicon' with Linux kernel contribution – and won't say why

    Intel has teased a new tech it calls "Software Defined Silicon" (SDSi) but is saying almost nothing about it – and has told The Register it could amount to nothing. SDSi popped up around three weeks ago in a post to the Linux Kernel mailing list, in which an Intel Linux software engineer named David Box described it as "a post-manufacturing mechanism for activating additional silicon features".

  • RadeonSI Lands Another "Very Large" Optimization To Further Boost SPECViewPerf - Phoronix

    In recent months we have seen a lot of RadeonSI optimizations focused on SPECViewPerf with AMD seemingly trying to get this open-source OpenGL driver into very capable shape moving forward for workstation GL workloads. Hitting Mesa 22.0-devel today is yet another round of patches for tuning SPECViewPerf.

  • Vendors Including NVIDIA Talk Up New OpenCL Extensions For Vulkan Interop, NN Inference - Phoronix

    Last Friday night we spotted OpenCL 3.0.9 with several new extensions included. Today The Khronos Group is formally announcing these latest OpenCL additions focused on Vulkan interoperability as well as neural network inferencing. These new extensions for OpenCL 3.0 include an integer dot product extension for neural network inferencing (cl_khr_integer_dot_product) with a focus on 8-bit integer support.

  • RadeonSI Enables NGG Shader Culling For Navi 1x Consumer GPUs - Phoronix

    As another possible performance win for RadeonSI Gallium3D as AMD's open-source Radeon OpenGL driver on Linux systems is enabling of NGG culling for Navi 1x consumer graphics processors rather than limiting it only to newer Navi 2x (RDNA2) GPUs. Merged on Monday was a patch to enable shader culling for Navi 1x consumer SKUs with no longer limiting it to Navi 2x / GFX10.3 or when using various debug options. This culling was also enabled for Navi 1x GPUs but only for the "Pro" graphics SKUs.

Databases: Managing Database Migrations, PostgreSQL-Related Releases

KDE Plasma 5.18.8, Bugfix Release for October

Plasma 5.18 was released in February 2020 with many feature refinements and new modules to complete the desktop experience. Read more

today's howtos

  • Speak to me! – Purism

    My trusty laptop’s speakers gave up the ghost. I don’t like to sit around in headphones all the time, I don’t have any other speakers, and the replacements are still being manhandled by the postman. I’d get used to the austerity if I hadn’t started missing calls from a friend. That’s unacceptable! But what am I supposed to do? Buy extra gadgets just to throw them away after a week? Nope, I’m not that kind of a person. But hey – I have a Librem 5! It has a speaker. It’s open. I have control over it, and I’m a hacker too. So I should be able to come up with a hack to turn it into a speaker for my laptop, right? Pulseaudio to the rescue. I look through the guide. There it is: forwarding audio over a network.

  • How To Install CSF Firewall on Debian 11 - idroot

    In this tutorial, we will show you how to install CSF Firewall on Debian 11. For those of you who didn’t know, CSF is also known as “Config Server Firewall” is a free and advanced firewall for Linux systems. We should use ConfigServer Security & Firewall (CSF) since this CSF have more advanced and comprehensive features than other firewall application such as UFW, Firewalld, or Iptables. Compared to the other Linux firewall application, CSF is more user-friendly and effective which is mostly used by web hosting providers. This article assumes you have at least basic knowledge of Linux, know how to use the shell, and most importantly, you host your site on your own VPS. The installation is quite simple and assumes you are running in the root account, if not you may need to add ‘sudo‘ to the commands to get root privileges. I will show you through the step-by-step installation of the ConfigServer Security & Firewall (CSF) on a Debian 11 (Bullseye).

  • What are the differences between SQL and MySQL | FOSS Linux

    Due to many organizations, businesses, companies, and firms making an online presence, databases have become the core requirement for their daily operations. A database in a layman’s language is defined as a collection of data stored and organized electronically to ensure easy retrieval, access, management, and manipulation of business data. Most business successes depend on databases since they aid in storing essential and relevant data in a central position. Besides, databases also help facilitate communication of crucial business info such as employee profiles, sales transactions, customer profiles, marketing campaigns, product inventory, etc. Furthermore, databases have ensured that the company’s data is secure through various authentication mechanisms like access specifiers, user logins, and sign-ups. This article will talk about the difference between the two popular relational databases SQL and MySQL.

  • How to install Funkin' Psych Engine on a Chromebook

    Today we are looking at how to install Friday Night Funkin' Psych Engine on a Chromebook. Please follow the video/audio guide as a tutorial where we explain the process step by step and use the commands below.

  • How to Use an SSH Key with Non-root Users - Unixcop

    You can SSH to your Linux instance as root with the key. However, the key doesn’t work for non-root users. So we will illustrate two methods to use SSH keys with non-root users.

  • Allow Port Through Firewall in Ubuntu 20.04 - Linux Nightly

    Ubuntu comes with ufw (uncomplicated firewall) installed by default. This is a frontend for iptables/nftables, the built-in Linux firewall, and is meant to make firewall management a bit easier. In this guide, you’ll see how to add rules to the firewall to open ports and allow certain services to have access through the firewall on Ubuntu.

  • Some regex tests with grep, sed and AWK

    In my data work I regularly do searching and filtering with GNU grep (version 3.3), GNU sed (4.7) and GNU AWK (4.2.1). I don't know if they all use the same regex engine, but I've noticed differences in regex speed between these three programs. This post documents some of the differences.

  • Upgrade to Fedora 35 from Fedora 34 using DNF – If Not True Then False

    This is guide, howto upgrade Fedora 34 to Fedora 35 using DNF. This method works on desktop and server machines. You can also upgrade older Fedora installations (example Fedora 33/32/31/30) directly to Fedora 35. I have tested this method on several machines, but if you have problems, please let me know. Always remember backup, before upgrade!

  • Jenkins: Basic security settings - Anto ./ Online

    Jenkins contains sensitive information. Thus it must be secured, like any other sensitive platform. Thankfully Jenkins provides you with many security options. This guide will show you all the essential bits that you need to know. You access these features on the Configure Global Security page under manage Jenkins.

  • LDAP query from Python · Pablo Iranzo Gómez's blog

    Recently, some colleagues commented about validating if users in a Telegram group were or not employees anymore, so that the process could be automated without having to chase down the users that left the company. One of the fields that can be configured by each user, is the link to other platforms (Github, LinkedIn, Twitter, Telegram, etc), so querying an LDAP server could suffice to get the list of users. First, we need to get some data required, in our case, we do anonymous binding to our LDAP server and the field to search for containing the ‘other platform’ links.