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October 2019

10 Best Flowchart and Diagramming Software for Linux

Filed under
Software

Diagrams are a great means for us to connect with information and process its significance; they help in communicating relationships and abstract information and enable us to visualize concepts.

The flowchart and diagramming tools are used for everything from basic workflow diagrams to complex network diagrams, organization charts, BPMN (Business Process Model and Notation), UML diagrams and much more.

Are you looking for free and open-source flowchart and diagramming software to create different kinds of diagrams, flowcharts, illustrations, maps, web graphics and more, on a Linux desktop? This article reviews 10 best flowcharts and diagramming software for Linux.

Read more

Raspberry Pi 4: Chronicling the Desktop Experience – Music Players – Week 2

Filed under
Linux

This is a weekly blog about the Raspberry Pi 4 (“RPI4”), the latest product in the popular Raspberry Pi range of computers.

For this week, I’ve been surveying the music player scene from an RPI4 respective. I’ve published reviews for more than 20 open source music players. There’s at least half a dozen other open source music players that are under active development that I’ve not yet covered.

How many music players I’ve looked at provide a .deb compiled for the Raspberry? A solitary program (musikcube). And I have a lot of sympathy with open source developers in this regard. They cannot possibly be expected to provide packages for Linux distributions given the sheer number available, although many do provide packages for the most popular. And the RPI4 doesn’t even run the x86 instruction set. The responsibility for packages squarely rests with a distribution.

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Linux shows its mettle when it comes to new cloud and edge applications

Filed under
Linux

We’re only two years off the 30th anniversary of the Linux kernel, which gave the open source software movement a turbo boost. At the annual Open Source Summit Europe run by the Linux Foundation this week in Lyon, France, Data Economy attended to find out how open source will address the evolving needs of cloud, edge and IoT connectivity.

The first time this writer saw Linux creator Linus Torvalds give a presentation about open source it was at an Informix database conference in Seattle in 1998, and the big news from that event was that Informix had introduced an open source version of its database. Not that long after the event IBM acquired Informix to confirm its own interest in supporting the open source development community, as well as making money out of it.

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Google 'Kills' Flash and the Internet 'Turns' 50

Filed under
Google
Web
  • Goodbye, Flash

    Google Search will stop supporting Flash later this year. In Web pages that contain Flash content, Google Search will ignore the Flash content. Google Search will stop indexing standalone SWF files. Most users and websites won't see any impact from this change.

  • Google to stop indexing Flash for search

    Minus indexing, searches for Flash content will come up empty. If Google doesn't index it, in other words, does it exist? For the vast majority on the web - analytics vendor Net Applications said Google accounted for 75% of global search activity last month - that would be a no.

  • The Internet At 50: It Has Enabled Many Wonderful Things, But We Have To Fight To Keep It That Way

    Today has been declared the 50th anniversary of the internet, as on October 29th, 1969, a team at UCLA, lead by Leonard Kleinrock, sent a message to a team at the Stanford Research Institute (SRI), representing the very first transmission over the then ARPANET, which later became the internet. This seems like a good moment to think about all that the internet has enabled -- but also just how far we may have strayed from its early promise and how far we might still be able to go. On the historical side, Kleinrock himself has posts at both ICANN and the Internet Society, and both are worth reading. The ICANN post is all about that first message transmission...

  • 5 milestones that created the [Internet] 50 years after the first network message

    Much more traffic than that travels through the [Internet] these days, with billions of emails sent and searches conducted daily. As a scholar of how the [Internet] is governed, I know that today’s vast communications web is a result of governments and regulators making choices that collectively built the [Internet] as it is today.

    Here are five key moments in this journey.

  • Internet 50 years old today

    On 29 October 1969 the first message was transmitted over ARPANET, the forerunner to the Internet. UCLA student programmer Charlie Kline used the University’s SDS Sigma 7 computer to login to an SDS 940 computer at Stanford Research Institute at Stanford University in Silicon Valley.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Ubuntu Server development summary – 29 October 2019

    The purpose of this communication is to provide a status update and highlights for any interesting subjects from the Ubuntu Server Team. If you would like to reach the server team, you can find us at the #ubuntu-server channel on Freenode. Alternatively, you can sign up and use the Ubuntu Server Team mailing list or visit the Ubuntu Server discourse hub for more discussion.

  • Peruvian International Scientific Meeting: Sinapsis 2019

    The first speaker pictured is Prof. Jorge Chau from the Leibniz Institute in Germany and his talk named “Studies of mesospheric and lower thermospheric turbulence and waves with novel multi-static MIMO specular meteor radars”. He made a thoughtful and impassioned explanation of his work. This time I understood maths and its application. My second favorite talk was given by Lucia Fitts Vargas. She talked about “Effects of disturbances and land used change on carbon stocks in six US states ” from the University of Minnesota. I liked her talk because she was able to explain in a very simple way the presence of carbon in trees in our jungle in Peru and then she gradually jumped to the complexity explanation about her carbon stock research and tools used in the USA. I was impressed by the research of Jacqueline Valverde Villegas from INSERM, Université de Montpellier, France about the HIV: “Aspectos genéticos e inmunológicos en la infección por el VIH/SIDA”, and the work of Juan Carlos Hurtado from the University of Barcelona: “Identificación de las causas de muerte en países de mediana y baja renta a través de la autopsia mínimamente invasiva”. I overheard good acceptance for the talk of Dr. Luis Dalguer about the earthquakes prediction in Switzerland: “Terremotos: su mecanismo físico, su predicción y prevención de desastres”. Lastly, the talk of Lucila Menacho from the University of Engineering in Peru named “Study, construction, and applications of supercapacitors based on graphene” was an interactive talk that everyone in the room paid attention. Congrats in general to all because all they were interesting topics.

  • FOSDEM 2020 Real-Time Communications Call for Participation

    You can use HTML and links in your bio, abstract and description.

    If you maintain a blog, please consider providing us with the URL of a feed with posts tagged for your RTC-related work.

    We will be looking for relevance to the conference and devroom themes, presentations aimed at developers of free and open source software about RTC-related topics.

    Please feel free to suggest a duration between 20 minutes and 55 minutes but note that the final decision on talk durations will be made by the devroom administrators based on the number of received proposals. As the two previous devrooms have been combined into one, we may decide to give shorter slots than in previous years so that more speakers can participate.

    [...]

    Generally, it was a good experience. I have not seen another peruvian in person more than a year and living again for a week with Wilson Valerio, Martin, Lucas, Alisa and others, made me remember my roots and way I am in Europe. I am glad I tried the best chocolate!

  • The best (and worst) ways to influence your open community

    After you've established a positive reputation in an open community—hopefully, as we discussed in our previous article, by being an active member in and contributing productively to that community—you'll have built up a healthy "bank balance" of credibility you can use to influence the direction of that community.

  • SourceForge download issues (and Github issues issues)

    There are two high-priority problems currently affecting TenFourFox's download and development infrastructure. Please don't open any more Tenderapp tickets on these: I am painfully aware of them and am currently trying to devise workarounds, and the more tickets get opened the more time I spend redirecting people instead of actually working on fixes.

    The first one is that the hack we use to relax JavaScript syntax to get Github working (somewhat) is now causing the browser to go into an infinite error loop on Github issue reports and certain other Github pages, presumably due to changes in code on their end. Unfortunately we use Github heavily for the wiki and issues tracker, so this is a major problem. The temporary workaround is, of course, a hack to relax JavaScript syntax even further. This hack is disgusting and breaks a lot of tests but is simple and does seem to work, so if I can't come up with something better it will be in FPR17. Most regular users won't be affected by this.

  • Colaboratory + Drive + Github -> the workflow made simpler
  • New project: Nice Telescope Planner

    And now, for something different, I have just dived into Java. I am sharing with you the first (pre-)release of Nice Telescope Planner, a simple cross-platform desktop utility for amateur astronomy hobbyists, written in Java. The aim is to provide an easy to use tool to help planning sky observation sessions, suggesting some of the interesting objects you may be able to watch at naked eye, or using amateur equipment (binoculars or small to medium size telescopes) in a given date/time and place.

  • Pete Zaitcev: Samsung shutting down CPU development in Austin

    An acquaintance of mine was laid off from Samsung. He was a rank-and-file ASIC designer and worked on FPU unit for Samsung's new CPU. Another acquaintance, a project manager in the silicon field, relayed that supposedly ARM developed a new CPUs that are so great, that all competitors gave up and folded their CPU development, resulting in the layoffs. The online sources have details.

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • PHP RCE flaw actively exploited to pop NGINX servers

    A recently patched vulnerability (CVE-2019-11043) in PHP is being actively exploited by attackers to compromise NGINX web servers, threat intelligence firm Bad Packets has confirmed.

  • How a months-old AMD microcode bug destroyed my weekend

    This weekend, I was excited to deploy my first Ryzen 3000-powered workstation in my home office. Unfortunately, a microcode bug—originally discovered in July but still floating around in large numbers in the wild—wrecked my good time. I eventually got my Ryzen 3700X system working, and it's definitely fast. But unfortunately, it's still bugged, and there's no easy way to fix it.

  • Intel's security problems are not going away

    Chipzilla's security problems are not going away, Linux kernel maintainer, Greg Kroah-Hartman has warned.

    Speaking to the assembled throngs at the Open Source Summit Europe Kroah-Hartman said Intel CPU's security problems "are going to be with us for a very long time" and are "not going away".

    He added: "They're all CPU bugs, in some ways they're all the same problem" but each has to be solved in its own way. "MDS, RDDL, Fallout, Zombieland: They're all variants of the same basic problem."

    Kroah-Hartman said that all the CPU bugs were potentially deadly for your security. RIDL and Zombieload, for example, can steal data across applications, virtual machines, even secure enclaves.

Unix: New Book About Unix and Tales From Australia

Filed under
OS
  • Unix Tell All Book From Kernighan Hits The Shelves

    When you think of the Unix and C revolution that grew out of Bell Labs, there are a few famous names. Dennis Ritchie, Ken Thompson, and Brian Kernighan come to mind. After all, the K in both K&R C and in AWK stand for Kernighan. While Kernighan is no stranger to book authorship — he’s written several classics including “the white book” for C and Unix — he has a new book out that is part historical record and part memoir about the birth of Unix.

    Usually, when a famous person writes a retrospective like this, it is full of salacious details, but we don’t expect much of that here. The book talks about Bell Labs and Multics, of course. There’s serious coverage of the first, sixth, and seventh editions with biographies of people integral to those releases.

    The final part of the book deals with the explosive growth and commercialization of the operating system along with its many descendants. Yes, Linux is in there, of course, as is BSD and others. In broad strokes, this probably doesn’t add a lot to what we all know about the history of Unix, but the personal details and just hearing it from a primary source is worth the price of admission.

  • Dominello reveals how NSW counselled Canberra on tech

    Dominello offers that the journey to get to the digital licence involved straddling a pile of back-end legacy. It included the former Roads and Traffic Authority's mainframe-based "Drives" architecture that sported a customised blend of Solaris, Unix, Oracle and Java.

More in Tux Machines

Mozilla Firefox: Spyware, Password Loggers, and Performance Monitoring

  • This Week in Glean: Designing a telemetry collection with Glean

    (“This Week in Glean” is a series of blog posts that the Glean Team at Mozilla is using to try to communicate better about our work. They could be release notes, documentation, hopes, dreams, or whatever: so long as it is inspired by Glean.) All “This Week in Glean” blog posts are listed in the TWiG index). Whenever I get a chance to write about Glean, I am usually writing about some aspects of working on Glean. This time around I’m going to turn that on its head by sharing my experience working with Glean as a consumer with metrics to collect, specifically in regards to designing a Nimbus health metrics collection. This post is about sharing what I learned from the experience and what I found to be the most important considerations when designing a telemetry collection. I’ve been helping develop Nimbus, Mozilla’s new experimentation platform, for a while now. It is one of many cross-platform tools written in Rust and it exists as part of the Mozilla Application Services collection of components. With Nimbus being used in more and more products we have a need to monitor its “health”, or how well it is performing in the wild. I took on this task of determining what we would need to measure and designing the telemetry and visualizations because I was interested in experiencing Glean from a consumer’s perspective.

  • Firefox Add-on Reviews: How to choose the right password manager browser extension

    All good password managers should, of course, effectively secure passwords; and they all basically do the same thing—you create a single, easy-to-remember master password to access your labyrinth of complex logins. Password managers not only spare you the hassle of remembering a maze of logins; they can also offer suggestions to help make your passwords even stronger. Fortunately there’s no shortage of capable password protectors out there. But with so many options, how to choose the one that’ll work best for you? Here are some of our favorite password managers. They all offer excellent password protection, but with distinct areas of strength.

  • Mozilla Performance Blog: Performance Sheriff Newsletter (September 2021)

    In September there were 174 alerts generated, resulting in 23 regression bugs being filed on average 6.4 days after the regressing change landed. Welcome to the September 2021 edition of the performance sheriffing newsletter. Here you’ll find the usual summary of our sheriffing efficiency metrics. If you’re interested (and if you have access) you can view the full dashboard.

Red Hat/Fedora Leftovers

  • The NeuroFedora Blog: Next Open NeuroFedora meeting: 25 October 1300 UTC

    Please join us at the next regular Open NeuroFedora team meeting on Monday 25 October at 1300UTC in #fedora-neuro on IRC (Libera.chat). The meeting is a public meeting, and open for everyone to attend.

  • Real-time Analytics News for Week Ending October 16 - RTInsights

    In this week’s real-time analytics news: Red Hat announced updates in its portfolio of tools and programs for building applications on Red Hat OpenShift, and more. Keeping pace with news and developments in the real-time analytics market can be a daunting task. We want to help by providing a summary of some of the items our staff came across each week. Here are some of the news items from this week: Red Hat announced a series of updates in its portfolio of developer tools and programs for developers building applications on Red Hat OpenShift. The updates were to Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines, Red Hat OpenShift GitOps, and the Red Hat build of Quarkus. Additionally, Red Hat expanded the roster of training resources available on Kube By Example.

  • What I learned about Kubernetes and Knative Serverless

    If you happened to miss this year’s Kubernetes Summer Camp, there’s some good news! The sessions were recorded and are available for on-demand viewing. Along with those, you’ll also get access to a variety of downloadable content, including a free O’Reilly e-book.

  • Awards roll call: August to October 2021 [Ed: Those accolades and fake rewards/awards can easily be bought; they let you game the system for money]

    From workplace accolades to product wins, we are proud to be able to highlight some aspects of our company and the recognition they’ve received in the past few months. We recently published our DEI Statement, which declares our commitment to diversity, equity and inclusion—not just for our associates, but for our partners, customers and open source contributors. Our culture is rooted in transparency, collaboration, and inclusion—open source principles that continue to drive our company forward. We see the following awards as a recognition of our open source-driven innovation, where the best ideas can come from anywhere and anyone.

Study of Editable Strokes for Inking

So, with Krita 5.0 nearing completion. There’s been some discussion about what we’ll do next. On of the proposed topics has been to replace our calligraphy tool with something that can produce nice variable width editable lines. Read more

Screencasts/Shows/Videos: KaOS 2021.10, Ubuntu Kylin 21.10, Late Night Linux, Linux in the Ham Shack

  • KaOS 2021.10 Run Through - Invidious

    In this video, we are looking at KaOS 2021.10. Enjoy!

  • Linux overview | Ubuntu Kylin 21.10 - Invidious

    In this video, I am going to show an overview of Ubuntu Kylin 21.10 and some of the applications pre-installed.

  • A Terror So Terrifying, You'll Swear It's Just A Myth - Invidious

    This Halloween comes a film so terrifying that you will swear it's just an urban legend. You think nothing bad can ever happen to you. After all, you run Linux! But what did you install on that Linux machine? And what does it want from you?

  • Late Night Linux – Episode 147

    The pros and cons of tiling window managers, and how we nearly use them. Plus your feedback about Flatpak, Firefox as a Snap, a web-based image editor, starting a FOSS career, and why we have a Telegram group instead of IRC or Matrix.

  • FOSS Alternatives For The Windows Refugee - Invidious

    When you first switch to Linux it can be hard to out what alternatives you should look into for the apps that you want to run so today we're going to look at exactly that

  • LHS Episode #436: Bowling for Ham Radio

    Hello and welcome to Episode 436 of Linux in the Ham Shack. In this short-topics episode, the hosts discuss an ARDC grant for high school STEM students, a pair of intrepid amateur radio hobbyists, state-sponsored ARCs in Africa, Ubuntu 21.10, Sysmon for Linux and much more. Thank you for listening and have a great week.