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October 2019

Next Pinebook Pro Pre-Order Window Opens Early November

Filed under
Linux

Linux laptop and general ARM computing enthusiasts alike will be able to pre-order the Pinebook Pro for $199 (excluding shipping costs) from November 6 direct from the Pine64 website.

But if you plan on being among them you’ll want to act fast as the first batch of Pinebook Pros sold out crazily fast — so fast that by the time I hit publish on an article about it, they were all gone!

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GIMP 2.10.14 Released

Filed under
GNU
Software

This is basically the first shot at the previously missing feature set, so expect more to land to GIMP at some point in the future. Making selection tools work outside the canvas sounds like a sensible next stop. Then maybe we can seriously talk about boundless canvas.

This new feature is closely related to out-of-canvas viewing and editing and was also contributed by Ell.

Now when you e.g. rotate a single-layer image, you can use this transform type to automatically expand the canvas to include all of rotated pixels when using the default Adjust clipping mode. The switch is right next to layer/path/selection toggle at the top of any transform tool’s settings.

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Also: GIMP 2.10.14 Released With Better HEIF Support, More Filters Ported To Using GEGL

i.MX8M and i.MX8M Mini SMARC modules debut with 3.5-inch carrier

Filed under
Linux

Ibase’s rugged “RM-N8M” SMARC module runs Linux on an i.MX8M with 3GB soldered LPDDR4 and up to 64GB eMMC. There’s also an upcoming “RM-N8MMI” SMARC that taps the i.MX8M Mini and a new 3.5-inch “RP-103-SMC” carrier.

Ibase announced an RM-N8M Series SMARC 2.0 form-factor module equipped with an NXP i.MX8M SoC. While poking around the Ibase website to see if the company had launched any previous SMARC modules, we found that indeed there is an i.MX6-based RM-F6 SMARC 1.0 module. We also saw a “preliminary” RM-N8MMI Series SMARC 2.0 module with an i.MX8M Mini that we cover farther below.

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Native GTK Dialogs in LibreOffice

Filed under
LibO

The LibreOffice UI was traditionally implemented with its own VCL toolkit which via theming emulated the host desktop toolkit.

Then we migrated the file format the dialogs were described in to the GtkBuilder file format. But still implemented with VCL widgetry, though with additional GTK-alike layout widgets.

Then migrated the translation format to gettext .mo files, which added plural form translation support we had lacked.

Then incrementally migrated the code driving the dialogs to a new API with two implementations, one for VCL widgetry and one for GTK.

Over the last few major releases the GTK version of LibreOffice has increasingly had true GTK dialogs and less VCL dialogs and in master, as of this week, there are now no direct uses of the VCL dialog APIs.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Rugged embedded trio run Linux on Whiskey Lake

    Vecow launched two compact, rugged embedded PCs with Intel's 8th Gen Whiskey Lake-UE. The Linux-ready SPC-5000 and -5100 offer 4x 10Gbps USB 3.1 Gen2 ports and SUMIT expansion with optional 10GbE modules, and the RES-3000 features IP67-protected M12 ports.

    Vecow announced a fanless, rugged SPC-5000 computer and almost identical, but wider-temp SPC-5100, equipped with Intel's 8th Gen Whiskey Lake-UE CPU. Both embedded computers target machine vision, in-vehicle computing, factory automation, ITS, intelligent control, and AIoT/Industry 4.0 applications.

    The SPC-5000/5100 systems appear to be based on Vecow's recently launched, 3.5-inch EMBC-3000 SBC. The EMBC-3000 also powers a larger, more feature-rich SPC-5200 computer that was announced at the same time in early September.

  • GStreamer & automated testing in Lyon

    Following three days at Embedded Linux Conference Europe, Collaborans are continuing their stay in the capital of France’s Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes region to take part the annual GStreamer Conference, as well as the Automated Testing Summit.

    Our entire multimedia team will be attending the GStreamer Conference, which takes place at L'Embarcadère on October 31 & November 1. They'll be presenting no less than a dozen times during the conference, on topics including RTP jitter buffer timers, network streaming protocols and PipeWire in the automotive industry. Read below for details & links to each of their talks.

    Back at the Palais des congrès de Lyon where ELCE took place, Gustavo Padovan, Linux Core Technologies Lead, will be taking part in the Automated Testing Summit on October 31. KernelCI will undoubtedly be a hot topic and heavily discussed as it became a Linux Foundation project just a few days ago.

  • Top opensource Android apps

    Since my transition to Linux I have acquired a culture of open source software, a culture that is expanding with every day I spend in Linux. 

    Especially after having seen the importance of open source applications in fighting the monopoly of Big softwares companies such as Microsoft, Apple, Adobe ...

    It has expanded to include even the way I use my smartphone, where I have become inclined to use open source applications, because of my love for open source on the one hand, and on the other hand because of the thirst of commercial software to spy on my personal information as well as the aggressive bad ads that hinder the good use of softwares. 

  • GraphQL a cut above the REST, say query lang's fans: Airbnb, Knotel, others embrace the tech

    At the GraphQL Summit in San Francisco on Wednesday, Matt DeBergalis, co-founder and CTO at data plumbing biz Apollo GraphQL, urged companies to appoint a data graph champion to help ease the implementation of GraphQL, a query language for fetching data.

    It's not yet a given that organizations want to implement GraphQL. But at a gathering arranged by Apollo, which makes the de facto standard open-source client and the commercial Apollo GraphQL Platform, there's a certain incentive to imagine GraphQL everywhere.

    It's already halfway there, at least among the 472 companies attending the show – about 52 per cent of organizations represented are already using the technology in production. Some of the more recognizable names include Airbnb, Audi, Expedia, The New York Times, Medium, PayPal, and Priceline.

  • After Server Breach, NordVPN Has Strengthened Security Measures

    What do you do when you find out the company you were entrusting with your privacy was hacked? Panic? There may have been a lot of that going on when NordVPN admitted to a security breach of their server.

    The good news is that NordVPN is on top of it, and it has already strengthened security measures. But will they be able to trust NordVPN again?

  • Shadow tree encapsulation theory

    Types 3 through 5 do not have any kind of support and type 4 and 5 encapsulation would be hard to pull off due to Spectre. User agents typically use a weaker variant of type 4 for their internal controls, such as the video and input elements, that does not protect confidentiality.

    [...]

    Type 2 encapsulation gives component developers control over what remains encapsulated and what is exposed. You need to take all your users into account and expose the best possible public API for them. At the same time, it protects you from folks taking a dependency on the guts of the component. Aspects you might want to refactor or add functionality to over time. This is much harder with type 1 encapsulation as there will be APIs that can reach into the details of your component and if users do so you cannot refactor it without updating all the callers.

Programming: Python, Bash and More

Filed under
Development
  • Python 3.8 Adds Walrus Operator, Improves Developer Experience

    The new release of the popular programming language includes capabilities to help developers produce better code, but it might take a while for enterprise adoption.

  • 4 Python tools for getting started with astronomy

    NumFOCUS is a nonprofit charity that supports amazing open source toolkits for scientific computing and data science. As part of the effort to connect Opensource.com readers with the NumFOCUS community, we are republishing some of the most popular articles from our blog. To learn more about our mission and programs, please visit numfocus.org. If you're interested in participating in the NumFOCUS community in person, check out a local PyData event happening near you.

  • Bash completion in Zato commands

    This is a quick tip on how to quickly and easily enable Bash completion for Zato commands - each time you press Tab when typing a Zato command, its arguments and parameters will be auto-completed.

  • Configurama - Building SaaS #36

    In this episode, we turned our attention to handling settings and configuration. We discussed different techniques for handling settings, looked at available tools, and started integrating one of the tools into the project.

    The initial discussion in the stream focused on different ways of doing settings. I talked about what I view as a difference between configuration (mostly static stuff) and settings (dynamic parts of the app).

    I also discussed where to get settings from. We talked about the 12 Factor App style with environment variables, and secret management tools like HashiCorp Vault and AWS KMS. Ironically, I blanked out on AWS Secrets Manager as an option. Additionally, we considered the alternative of reading settings from a file instead of environment variables and the security implications of environment variables.

  • Site.js: now with auto server reload on source code changes

    Sorry, your browser doesn't support embedded videos. But that doesn’t mean you can’t watch it! You can download this video directly, and watch it with your favourite video player.

Red Hat: Kubernetes, RHEL Impact and Halloween Release

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Why you don't have to be afraid of Kubernetes

    It was fun to work at a large web property in the late 1990s and early 2000s. My experience takes me back to American Greetings Interactive, where on Valentine's Day, we had one of the top 10 sites on the internet (measured by web traffic). We delivered e-cards for AmericanGreetings.com, BlueMountain.com, and others, as well as providing e-cards for partners like MSN and AOL. Veterans of the organization fondly remember epic stories of doing great battle with other e-card sites like Hallmark. As an aside, I also ran large web properties for Holly Hobbie, Care Bears, and Strawberry Shortcake.

    I remember like it was yesterday the first time we had a real problem. Normally, we had about 200Mbps of traffic coming in our front doors (routers, firewalls, and load balancers). But, suddenly, out of nowhere, the Multi Router Traffic Grapher (MRTG) graphs spiked to 2Gbps in a few minutes. I was running around, scrambling like crazy. I understood our entire technology stack, from the routers, switches, firewalls, and load balancers, to the Linux/Apache web servers, to our Python stack (a meta version of FastCGI), and the Network File System (NFS) servers. I knew where all of the config files were, I had access to all of the admin interfaces, and I was a seasoned, battle-hardened sysadmin with years of experience troubleshooting complex problems.

    But, I couldn't figure out what was happening...

    Five minutes feels like an eternity when you are frantically typing commands across a thousand Linux servers. I knew the site was going to go down any second because it's fairly easy to overwhelm a thousand-node cluster when it's divided up and compartmentalized into smaller clusters.

  • The economic impact of Red Hat Enterprise Linux: How IT professionals benefit

    It’s not overstated to say that the IT landscape completely changed with the introduction of Red Hat Enterprise Linux, more than a decade and a half ago. For 2019, IDC estimated a global business revenue of $188 trillion. Of this, they estimate that at least 40% is touched by software, leaving the IT footprint to be an estimated $81 trillion. Yes, you read that right, $81 trillion. As all of this software forming the global business IT footprint has to run on an operating system, IDC estimates that over 50% is running on Linux, with Red Hat Enterprise Linux accounting for 25% of that.

    That’s a lot of big numbers but what does it all mean? It means that Red Hat Enterprise Linux has changed the experience of many IT professionals around the globe. In a software-centric world, ongoing we have seen higher demand in support and IT services which in turn further helps fuel the global IT ecosystem.

    When IDC asked IT organizations how Red Hat Enterprise Linux benefitted them, they discovered a 12% savings in IT staff productivity. This means that IT professionals spend less time managing servers, doing routine IT tasks, resolving support calls, deploying new business apps and upgrading mission-critical apps. But that’s not all.

  • The spooktacular tale of Red Hat's Halloween release

    In many stories and myths, naming is important. Knowing the proper name of something gives you power over it. Likewise, naming has been important for Red Hat Linux over the years.

    The Halloween release was actually a paid beta and not a 1.0. The Halloween release was dubbed Red Hat Software Linux 0.9, and started a tradition of having a codename for the release that lasted through the final Red Hat Linux release (9.0.93, "Severn"), and carried over to Fedora for many years.

    The tradition was to have a name for a release that was somewhat related to the previous release name. For example, the 1.0 release was "Mother's Day," and "Rembrandt" followed "Picasso," and "Colgate" followed it. (For the record, the best release name was a Fedora release, dubbed "Zod." Allowing many fun headlines playing off the Superman II villain.)

Linspire 8.5 Linux Operating System Released, Based on Ubuntu 18.04.3 LTS

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

Linspire 8.5 "Swordfish 2" is a major release compared to the previous versions, bringing numerous updated components and various new features for a full-fledged Linux desktop experience. Just like its little brother Freespire 5.0, Linspire 8.5 is based on Ubuntu 18.04.3 LTS (Bionic Beaver) and uses the Linux 5.0 kernel.

Similar to Freespire 5.0, the goal for Linspire 8.5 was to address the bloatware complaints from the community and make the distribution slimmer by including only the "best of breed" applications. Of course, this means that, if users want to replace the default apps or install more, they can use the software center utility.

Read more

Direct: Linspire 8.5 Released

More in Tux Machines

Devices: Arduino Nano, HarmonyOS,and Pi

  • Arduino Nano Floppy Emulator For When Your Disk Is Not Accessible | Hackaday

    Among the plethora of obsolete removable media there are some which are lamented, but it can be difficult to find those who regret the passing of the floppy disk. These flexible magnetic disks in hard plastic covers were a staple of computing until some time in the early 2000s, and their drives could be found by the crateload in any spares box. But what about today, when there’s a need for a real floppy drive and none is to be found? Enter [Acemi Elektronikci], with an Arduino Nano based floppy emulator, that plugs into the floppy port of a PC old enough to have one, and allows the easy use of virtual floppy disks.

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  • HarmonyOS development board shows up for $11

    Last year, we noted the Hisilicon Hi3861 based HiSpark WiFi IoT development board with supports LiteOS and HarmonyOS that was available in China for just under $10, or as part of a devkit with baseboard and modules for around $60. Although not very practical, buying from Taobao was possible, but there’s now what appears to be a new revision of the Hi3861V100 based HarmonyOS development board in a wider form factor on Banggood for $10.99.

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  • Raspberry Pi CM4 handheld console looks like a Nintendo Switch Lite - CNX Software

    StonedEge and Dmcke5 have come up with an incredibly well-designed Raspberry Pi CM4 handheld console that looks like a Nintendo Switch Lite “clone”, and that can run Dreamcast and PSP emulators at full speed using RetroPie. The RetroLite CM4 The design includes a 5-inch display, speakers, all buttons, joysticks, and D-PAD controlled via a custom Arduino board, a micro HDMI port to connect an external display, and a 4000 mAh LiPo battery charged over the USB Type-C port, and it seems to work, albeit we are told there’s still some more work to do.

  • Lilbits: TCL’s concept smart glasses, PineNote E Ink tablet, and using the Raspberry Pi 400 as a keyboard
  • “Industrial Pi” Use Cases with Ubuntu and AMD

    DFI’s GHF51 mini industrial-grade motherboard, and the EC90A-GH mini fanless industrial computer, are the world’s first industrial computer products that have passed the Ubuntu IoT hardware certification and are equipped with high-performance AMD processors. The 1.8-inch motherboard of the Ryzen R1000 processor has the same small size as the Raspberry Pi but brings unprecedented powerful computing performance, powerful expansion capabilities, and durability tailored for industrial applications. Combining the online update mechanism of the Ubuntu Certified Hardware and the online application store, the breakthrough development of “Industrial Pi” will redefine the future of the Industrial Internet of Things. 

Audiocasts/Shows: WordPress, Linux Action News, Scams, and Fake Security

  • WP Briefing: Episode 18: The Economics of WordPress

    In episode 18 of WP Briefing, Josepha Haden Chomphosy reflects on a recent lecture that she gave to students at Hendrix College in which she explored the economics of WordPress and the principles that sustain the project’s ecosystem.

  • Linux Action News 211

    We cover what's special about Plasma's 25th-anniversary edition, chat with CloudLinux's CEO, and detail why Apple supporting Blender is good for all of us.

  • These Open Source SCAMMERS are getting out of control! - Invidious

    No, Inkscape isn't a scam. In fact, it's the best vector illustration tool on the planet. But, much like Krita just a few weeks ago, scammers have registered official-looking domains that are meant to trick people into downloading and installing ransomware. It's sad to see and I can't think of many ways we can combat this besides raising awareness.

  • Josh Bressers: Episode 293 – Scoring OpenSSF Security Scoring

    Josh and Kurt talk about the release of OpenSSF Security Scorecards version 3. This is a great project that will probably make a huge difference. Most of the things the scorecards are measuring are no brainier activities. We go through the list of metrics being measured. There are only a few that we don’t think are fantastic.

IBM/Red Hat Leftovers

  • Use and contribute to a new Open Source Cloud Guide

    Today, at All Things Open, IBM is releasing the Open Source Cloud Guide, which highlights various use cases that are important in hybrid cloud environments, features the important open source projects in those areas, and discusses how various clouds are using open source in their offerings. By open sourcing the guide, developers are able to both use and contribute to the learnings and use cases

  • Announcing Cryostat 2.0: JDK Flight Recorder for containers

    Cryostat is a container-native JVM application that provides a secure API for profiling and monitoring containers with JDK Flight Recorder (JFR). JDK Flight Recorder collects profiling and diagnostic data from applications using JFR events stored in binary flight recordings. When requested, Cryostat can retrieve, store, and analyze flight recordings from containerized Java virtual machines (JVMs) to assess overall application health. Users can download recording files and upload them to JDK Mission Control (JMC) or Grafana for further analysis. This article introduces Cryostat and shares new features in the 2.0 release, including example use cases, tips for getting started, and additional release notes. For more information about Cryostat fundamentals, visit Introduction to Cryostat: JDK Flight Recorder for containers.

  • Kafka Monthly Digest: September 2021

    Welcome to the 44th edition of the Kafka Monthly Digest. In this edition, I'll cover what happened in the Apache Kafka community in September 2021. For last month’s digest, see Kafka Monthly Digest: August 2021 on IBM Developer.

  • Sensitive information detection using the NVIDIA Morpheus AI framework

    The growth of cloud-native applications has driven an explosion of east-west network traffic within a datacenter where applications can create hundreds of thousands of network connections among virtual machines and containers. As a consequence, the ability to track, monitor, and secure a datacenter in a timely manner has risen above that of any individual or team, thus requiring the help of AI and machine learning (AI/ML) to enable ITOps, infrastructure security, and DevSecOps teams to manage the complexity of modern cloud-native applications and the underlying platforms. Red Hat and NVIDIA have been working together to bring the security analytics capabilities of the NVIDIA Morpheus AI application framework to Red Hat infrastructure platforms for cybersecurity developers. This article provides a set of configuration instructions to Red Hat developers working on applications that use the NVIDIA Morpheus AI application framework and NVIDIA BlueField data processing units (DPUs) to secure interservice communication.

  • DevSecOps: 11 questions to ask about your security strategy now

    It’s the fourth and final quarter of 2021, believe it or not. That makes it time for IT leaders to review and evaluate how things are going – and plan for 2022. Security sometimes gets left out of those conversations. We’re here to make sure that doesn’t happen, with an extensive list of questions worth asking as you assess your security posture and look for ways to improve. We’ll start with a series of topics that are particularly relevant for teams that are considering or already implementing a DevSecOps strategy, then we’ll cover a series of fundamental questions worth asking in any organization – especially those currently struggling to modernize their security approach.

  • How Podman runs on Macs and other container FAQs | Enable Sysadmin

    As the Podman machine function becomes more used—particularly on Macs—there have been many questions about how this all works. Some of what is tossed around on the internet is pure speculation, so this article aims to eliminate any speculation. Many people do not realize that containers are really Linux. As such, Linux containers cannot run natively on macOS. Therefore, the containers must run in a Linux virtual machine (VM), and a Podman client interacts with that VM. This is in line with all solutions for running containers on macOS.

Gentoo-Based Porteus Kiosk 5.3 Released with Hardware Video Decoding, Virtual Keyboard

Porteus Kiosk 5.3 is here about six months after Porteus Kiosk 5.2 to add several new features, including experimental hardware video decoding support and virtual keyboard for both Mozilla Firefox ESR and Google Chrome web browsers. While the hardware decoding feature can be enabled in remote config with the hardware_video_decode parameter, the virtual keyboard feature comes as an extension and will pop-up automatically when clicking an input field on a web page. Users can control the virtual keyboard in remote config with the virtual_keyboard parameter. Read more