Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

November 2019

Auditing For Accessibility Problems With Firefox Developer Tools

Filed under
Moz/FF

First, select the Accessibility Inspector from the Developer Toolbox. Turn on the accessibility engine by clicking “Turn On Accessibility Features.” You’ll see a full representation of the current foreground tab as assistive technologies see it. The left pane shows the hierarchy of accessible objects. When you select an element there, the right pane fills to show the common properties of the selected object such as name, role, states, description, and more. To learn more about how the accessibility tree informs assistive technologies, read this post by Hidde de Vries.

Read more

today's leftovers and howtos

Filed under
Misc
  • Why Are There So Many Linux Distribution? How To Choose The Most Appropriate?

    The title above is one of the questions that once existed in my mind, maybe also the readers. I am currently a Xubuntu user, but many of my community partners use different distributions. Some use Linux Mint, Arch, Ubuntu, Kali and many others.

    Each linux user have their own preferences. We as users also cannot force other Users to use the same Linux distribution that we use. The point is need. The needs of every linux user are definitely different. Some people use Linux distributions for the purposes of programming, design, or network security and others.

    From these various needs, there are many Linux distributions that can be chosen by users based on their needs. There are thousands of Linux distributions listed in Distrowatch. In fact, almost every week we will get information about new releases that are listed on this site.

  • [Older] OpenZFS Developer Summit 2019

    The much-discussed hope to unify the OpenZFS code bases across the supported operating systems went from dialog to action item with the bold declaration by OpenZFS co-founder Matt Ahrens that the ZFS on Linux repo will be renamed simply “OpenZFS” and that the next milestone release will be “OpenZFS 2.0”. “As far as I’m concerned, this can’t come too soon,” said one attendee. Remarkably, there has been zero public objection to this effort. OpenZFS developer on macOS and Windows Jörgen Lundman supported this point with Michael Dexter in their talk “OpenZFS Everywhere”, in which they reported on the status of OpenZFS on the obvious platforms: Illumos, FreeBSD, and GNU/Linux, but also macOS, NetBSD, and Windows.

  • A Coalition to Support Implementation of the UNESCO OER Recommendation

    Why does it matter? This Recommendation is an official UNESCO instrument that gives national governments a specific list of recommendations to support open education in their countries and to collaborate with other nations.

  • Krita 4.2.8 Released! How to Install it in Ubuntu 19.10
  • Using WPScan to find WordPress vulnerabilities on your website

Windows 10 vs. Linux Performance On The AMD Ryzen Threadripper 3970X

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

The new AMD Ryzen Threadripper 3970X is performing faster on Linux than Microsoft Windows 10. When carrying out more than 80 different tests on Windows 10 compared to five Linux distributions, Windows 10 was beat out by the open-source competition. However, the performance loss for Windows isn't as dramatic as we have seen out of earlier generations of Ryzen Threadripper HEDT workstations. Here are those benchmarks of Windows 10 compared to Ubuntu 19.10, CentOS 8, Clear Linux, Fedora Workstation 31, and openSUSE Tumbleweed.

This is our first cross-operating-system look at the Threadripper 3970X since it was released last week. All five tested Linux distributions installed fine when using the MCE workaround to boot. There were no other problems to report for hardware compatibility with this Zen 2 HEDT system on the different Linux distributions. The hardware used for all of this Windows/Linux testing was the AMD Ryzen Threadripper 3970X at stock speeds, ASUS ROG ZENITH II EXTREME TRX40 motherboard, 4 x 16GB Corsair DDR4-3600MHz memory, 1TB Corsair Force MP600 NVMe SSD, Radeon RX 580 graphics, NZXT Kraken water cooling, and a Thermaltake Toughpower 1250 Watt power supply.

Read more

This tiny handheld laptop with QWERTY keyboard boots Android and Linux

Filed under
Android
Linux

After launching the Psion-inspired Gemini PDA in 2017, UK based Planet Computers is now bringing its hybrid smartphone with dual-screen for the general public.

The Cosmo Communicator is inspired by vintage personal digital assistants (PDAs) such as Nokia Communicator, Sharp Netwalker and Psion Series 5.

Last year, Planet Computers started a crowdfunding campaign for a PDA-inspired hybrid smartphone. This campaign managed to attract under 4,000 backers and collect $2.05 million (€1.86m) in funding.

Read more

Linux phones need to succeed and it isn’t just about privacy

Filed under
Linux

Android and iOS may be the mobile platforms today but there have always been attempts to push other horses into the race. Most of them used the Linux kernel just like Android but a few were more direct efforts to bring some of the Linux desktop stack to mobile in one form or another. Thanks to changes in the industry, particularly in electronic components and production, there has been a steady rise of such attempts to create true Linux and truly open source phones, with Purism’s Librem 5 and PINE64’s PinePhone leading the way. These are primarily targeted at a small hobbyist market and at users that value privacy and security above all else. But while those are valid and desirable goals, it’s actually important that these Linux phones become more mainstream in order to cultivate a healthier and better mobile market in general.

Read more

WWW: Mozilla and the Contract for the Web, IPv6 and Terrible News for .ORG

Filed under
Moz/FF
Web
  • Mozilla and the Contract for the Web

    Mozilla supports the Contract for the Web and the vision of the world it seeks to create. We participated in helping develop the content of the principles in the Contract. The result is language very much aligned with Mozilla, and including words that in many cases echo our Manifesto. Mozilla works to build momentum behind these ideas, as well as building products and programs that help make them real.

  • Native IPv6: One Month Later

    That’s telling me I received 1.8 times as much traffic via IPv6 over the past month as I did over IPv4. Even discounting my backups (the 2 v6 peaks), which could account for up to half of that, that means IPv6 and IPv4 are about equal. That’s with all internal networks doing both and no attempt at traffic shaping between them - everything’s free to pick their preference.

    I don’t have a breakdown of what went where, but if you run a network and you’re not v6 enabled, why not? From my usage at least you’re getting towards being in the minority.

  • Why I Voted to Sell .ORG

    Hi, I'm Richard. I've been around the Internet for a while. I work for Cisco now, and used to lead security for Firefox. I've published a few RFCs and served on the Internet Engineering Steering Group (the board of the IETF). I was a co-founder of Let's Encrypt and I currently serve on its board. I care about the Internet, and I care about nonprofits.
    I'm also a member of the Board of the Internet Society, and in that role, I joined the board's unanimous decision to sell the Public Interest Registry (PIR), the registry for the .org top-level domain, to Ethos Capital. Since this transaction has gotten some attention, I'd like to speak a little about why, in my estimation, this deal is a good one for the Internet.

Exton|OS Distro Is Now Based on Ubuntu 19.10 and Ships with Linux Kernel 5.4

Filed under
OS
Linux
Ubuntu

As we reported last week, Arne Exton started upgrading some of his GNU/Linux distributions on the latest Linux 5.4 kernel series, but Exton|OS is the first to ship with the stable version of Linux kernel 5.4, which was announced by Linus Torvalds on November 24th, a major release that features exFAT support, AMD improvements, and a new lockdown feature.

This new Exton|OS release is built for UEFI PCs and ships with the latest Budgie 10.5 desktop environment by default with the Papirus icon theme, the Calamares graphical installer instead of Ubuntu's Ubiquity installer, and up-to-date packages synced with upstream as of November 28, 2019, including GIMP, Gparted, Mozilla Firefox, SMPlayer, and SMTube.

Read more

Qt Creator 4.11 RC released

Filed under
KDE

We are happy to announce the release of Qt Creator 4.11 RC!

Find more details on what is new in Qt Creator 4.11 in the release blog post for the Beta, and in our change log. And seize this opportunity to test 4.11 and give us last minute feedback!

Read more

Raspberry Pi Playfulness and Apple's War Against Playfulness

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

         

  • Thermal testing Raspberry Pi 4 - Raspberry Pi

           

             

    Raspberry Pi 4 just got a lot cooler! The last four months of firmware updates have taken over half a watt out of idle power and nearly a watt out of fully loaded power. For The MagPi magazine, Gareth Halfacree gets testing.

  •                

  • Raspberry Pi 4 borks WiFi at 2160 x 1440 resolution

                     

                       

    The bug was flagged on various forums that chat about the Raspberry Pi, but has left a few people scratching their noggins.

                       

    "The WiFi problem looks like a bug. If I start with low resolution, the 2.4GHz network works nicely. If I go to 1920x1080 wlan0 either shows ‘not available' or so, or it shortly shows a neighbouring network labelled with a red ‘5G', depending on what I click at the top of the screen, but my 2.4GHz network is not recognized. With my router set to 5GHz (+2.4) it works," said one forum user.

  •                

  • Debullshitifying the Right to Repair excuses Apple sent to Congress

                     

                       

    Apple's response to the Congressional committee investigating monopolistic behavior by tech giants contains a chapter on Right to Repair, whose greatest enemy is Apple -- the company led successful campaigns to kill 20 state level Right to Repair bills last year.

                       

    Apple's response was parsimonious with the truth.

  •                

  • Right-to-Repair Groups Don't Buy Apple’s Answers to Congress

                     

                       

    iFixit and US PIRG both contest some of Apple’s responses, particularly around the ways in which Apple may or may not advise against non-authorized repairs. Another point they take issue with is Apple’s use of the phrase “same unit repair,” which is worth unpacking. Many key components within an iPhone or Mac can be repaired, Apple says in its response, but “same unit repairs” aren’t possible for all products because of the challenges around disassembling and reassembling devices.

                       

    In other words, a customer might go into the Apple Store or other authorized repair shop for a fix, and the repair might be so complex that the product is effectively replaced. The topic of “repairs” not only becomes one of semantics but also raises the question of whether Apple (and other electronics makers) could be slotting full replacement devices into a definition of repairs. Proctor, of US PIRG, says in his blog post that this is Apple attempting to “create a new category of repair.”

  • Jony Ive has left Apple

    Apple will be a client of Ive’s new design company, LoveFrom, which the designer started in collaboration with his long-time friend and collaborator Marc Newson. “Apple will continue to benefit from Jony’s talents by working directly with him on exclusive projects, and through the ongoing work of the brilliant and passionate design team he has built,” said Apple CEO Tim Cook at the time. Software and hardware design is now the responsibility of COO Jeff Williams.

The 20 Best Control Panels for Hassle-Free Server Management

Filed under
Server
Software

It’s not very hard to manage web servers for most Linux powers users. However, it’s certainly not a child’s play, and new site owners often find it extremely difficult to manage their servers properly. Thankfully, there’s a huge list of robust control panels that makes server management hassle-free even for beginners. It can also be useful for experienced server owners who’re looking for convenient hosting panel management solutions. That’s why our editors have curated this guide outlining the 20 best admin panel for modern web servers.

Read more

More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

Linux Mint vs. Ubuntu – which is best for you?

Which is the best Linux distro for you? In this article, we will present to you key differences between the two most popular Linux distros and let you decide. Ubuntu is released and maintained by a company called Canonical, while Linux Mint is community-driven. Which model will sustain? Read on to find more. When you come into the Linux world, there are hundreds of options. Although, two names come up for every beginner and in the mind of every experienced person – Ubuntu and Linux Mint. The conundrum is that which one among them? The best solution is to try both of them out, and then choose whatever seems to work the best for your needs. But here, we’re giving you some distinctions between the both that might make it easier for you to make a choice. Read more

Reasons to Give openSUSE a Try

For some reason, all the light goes these days toward distributions like Ubuntu, Mint, Manjaro, Solus… And the other similar ones. But despite being an excellent Linux distribution in itself, openSUSE rarely receives attention in the Linux press and its userbase doesn’t sound to be comparable to other famous Linux distributions. This perhaps could be because people don’t know about the features of openSUSE? Or they fear trying it because of some reason. In any case, we’ll introduce you to the distribution and its features, and why you should give it a try. Read more

today's howtos