Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

December 2019

Watch 4 Linux-Based Mobile OSes Running on the PinePhone

Filed under
OS
Linux

As I’ve mentioned previously: the PinePhone Linux phone has me super excited.

And one of reasons why I’m so gaga over this gadget rather than, say, the pricey Purism Librem 5 is the breadth of mobile OS support planned for it.

There’s just something innately “Linux-y” about having an accessible hardware platform that software projects are free and encouraged to build on, extend, explore, expand, etc.

Don’t like the default OS? Switch it for another! Don’t like that? Try something else!

The PinePhone lets you distro hop on your phone! There are multiple Linux mobile OSes planning to support the device. And as the SD card is bootable, it’ll be easy to switch between systems too!

In the video below (filmed and uploaded by Pine64, not me) we get a glimpse at 4 Linux mobile operating systems currently under active development for the first-generation PinePhone...

Read more

The trials and tribulations of UI scaling on Linux

A little over a month ago I wrote about an issue I was having in Linux, where playing a video would cause processor usage to skyrocket, and hence, increase the heat output considerably, causing the fans in my laptop to spin up loudly. This behaviour was Linux-specific, as it didn’t happen when using the same laptop in Windows.

I experienced the problem on KDE Neon and the latest KDE release and on Linux Mint running Cinnamon. After publication of the article, and at the suggestion of lakerssuperman2, I tried the latest release of Ubuntu running GNOME, but there, too, I experienced the problem. Many other readers were quite helpful in trying to get the problem fixed – or at least diagnosed – but I wasn’t getting anywhere.

Read more

How The Radeon RX 5700 XT Navi Linux Performance Has Evolved Since Launch

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

As part of our year-end articles we already provided benchmarks looking at the Radeon OpenGL / Vulkan driver performance for 2019. That testing was done using Polaris and Vega given their GPU support prior to 2019, but for those wondering about the Radeon RX 5700 "Navi" performance for these GPUs that launched this summer, here are some end-of-year tests.

This comparison is looking at the AMD Radeon RX 5700 XT performance for the August 2019 state of the Linux graphics driver compared to the latest driver state as of this week. The testing was done with the AMD Ryzen 9 3900X on ASUS CROSSHAIR VIII HERO WiFi motherboard, 2 x 8GB DDR4-3600 memory, Samsung 970 EVO NVMe SSD, and the reference Radeon RX 5700 XT graphics card.

Read more

Games: Vintage Story, Tower of Time, Monolith: Relics of the Past, Two Point Hospital

Filed under
Gaming
  • Deep open-world survival game Vintage Story adds a big new weather system

    It's getting a lot more difficult to hold myself back on that buy button on Vintage Story, with so many huge updates to it lately. Another is now in testing, adding in a big new weather system.

    This new weather system is location-bound, meaning different biomes will see different weather patterns. There's also various degrees of wind, snow, hail and other effects. Weather will also affect certain game mechanics, like rain putting out fire.

  • GOG are finishing their Winter Sale by giving away the RPG Tower of Time

    Grab the excellent real-time dungeon crawling RPG, Tower of Time, completely FREE from GOG during the final days of their Winter Sale.

    I'm a big fan of Tower of Time, it has a wonderful setting to explore and the real-time combat is certainly something that feels a little more unique. The developer, Event Horizon, are also working on a new RPG called Dark Envoy and you can find more details on that here.

  • Monolith: Relics of the Past extends the excellent shooter with a ridiculous amount of extra content

    Monolith's twin-stick rogue-lite room to room shooting is practically perfection, it didn't need an expansion but I'm glad Relics of the Past exists so I can sit and play a huge amount more.

  • You can now easily grab all the extra items for Two Point Hospital from The Superbug Initiative

    The Superbug Initiative in Two Point Hospital is a pretty sweet social feature, where people come together to solve big goals and it then unlocks special items for you.

    However, it does require you to be an active player participating in them all. For some who don't have time to constantly play, you could feel like you're missing out. Well, no more.

    Two Point Studios have setup what they're calling a Hospital Pass but don't worry it's not a paid-pass like other games. It gets you to sign in with your Steam account to give you a hidden DLC, then it will ask you to sign up to their newsletter. Once done, you will instantly get the Golden Toilet, Golden Sink and Golden Hand Dryer to make your hospital look truly shiny.

Trinity Desktop Environment R14.0.7 Released!

Filed under
KDE

The Trinity Desktop Environment (TDE) development team is pleased to announce the immediate availability of the new TDE R14.0.7 release. TDE is a complete software desktop environment designed for Unix-like operating systems, intended for computer users preferring a traditional desktop model, and is free/libre software.

R14.0.7 is the seventh maintenance release of the R14.0 series, and is built on and improves the previous R14.0.6 version. Maintenance releases are intended to promptly bring bug fixes to users, while preserving overall stability through the avoidance of both major new features and major codebase re-factoring.

Read more

Also: Trinity Desktop R14.0.7 Released For Keeping KDE 3 Spirit Alive In 2020

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android

Purism on Hardware and Security in 2019

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Gadgets
  • 2019 Year in Review: Hardware

    At the end of 2018 and going into 2019 we shipped the Librem 5 development kits – the first hardware for the Librem 5. The dev kits give developers very similar hardware and features to develop software against ahead of the final hardware being released, this is especially useful for GUI developers to visualize the applications. The first dev kits had a bug in the silicon of the i.MX8M CPU which meant the LCD did no work. It took a lot of effort but we fixed the issue in March giving everyone a fully functional LCD. In June we released a software update which enabled cellular calls.

  • 2019 Year in Review: Security

    This year also saw a number of improvements in supply chain security. On the physical supply chain front we announced the Made in USA Librem Key and more recently the Librem 5 USA. In both cases we are bringing the manufacturing of our electronics next to our fulfillment center where we can more directly oversee it.

    Finally we publicized our anti-interdiction services, a service that adds a number of sophisticated security measures to our fulfillment process to make it difficult to tamper with laptop shipments without detection. Up until now we haven’t publicized the service even though we offered it to customers who asked. Now it appears as an upgrade option on our laptops along with the PureBoot Bundle. We’ve already seen a dramatic interest in the service since we announced it publicly.

More in Tux Machines

KDE Neon vs Kubuntu: What’s the Difference Between the Two KDE Distribution?

I know it is often confusing especially if you have never used either of them but got them as recommendations for usage. Hence, to help you make a decision, I thought of compiling a list of differences (and similarities) between KDE Neon and Kubuntu. Let’s start with getting to know the similarities and then proceed with the differences. Read more

Linux vs. BSD: 10 Key Things You Need to Know

Both Linux and BSD (Berkeley Software Distribution) are free, open-source, and based on Unix. Both systems also use many of the same applications and strive towards the same goal – developing the most stable and reliable operating system. But, despite all the similarities, these are two distinct operating systems with plenty of differences. Keeping this in mind, we have put together a detailed read going over 10 key differences between Linux vs. BSD to give you a better understanding of the two systems. Read more

Ubuntu Touch: What It Is and Why It Is Awesome

Ubuntu, a popular open-source operating system (OS), has garnered a huge community around it. The OS has been around for quite some time and has gone through numerous changes and updates. Since Ubuntu has a Linux kernel at its core, it adheres to the same philosophy as Linux. For example, everything needs to be free, with open-source availability. Thus, it is extremely secure and reliable. Furthermore, it is well-known for its stability, and it is improved with each update. Ubuntu combines the fantastic .deb Debian package with an exceptionally stable desktop environment to produce a system that works fantastically well. In addition, because it has one of the largest communities, developers usually produce Linux-based software for Ubuntu first to cater to the large community. [...] Since Ubuntu Touch is built upon Ubuntu, it uses the same color scheme as and a similar layout to Ubuntu Desktop. Unlike Android and iOS, Ubuntu Touch does not make much use of buttons; the only two buttons it uses are the power button and the volume button. Furthermore, Ubuntu Touch does not have a centralized home location to return to after clicking the home button and instead uses an applications launcher, which stores all the installed application Read more

Software: ncmpcpp, GNU Make and gedit

  • Ncmpcpp: The Best MPD Client With The Worst Name - YouTube

    I picked a good place to start with MPD client, I think it's fair to say that ncmpcpp might be one of the best mpd clients that exist, I'll be trying out other but I don't know how anything will top this one.

  • Things I do: Proposal to add build graph output to GNU Make

    In 2015 I worked as a consultant at a large company in Lund. My position was with the build team and one of our responsibilities was managing and maintaining the build system for their Android based phones. The problem I was tasked with solving was the fact that running 'make' for a product after a successful build resulted in a lot of stuff being rebuilt unnecessarily. A stock Android build tree behaved nicely: a second run of 'make' only produced a line about everything being up-to-date. But the company products were taking a good 15 minutes for a rebuild even if nothing had been changed. The Android build system works by including all recipes to be built (programs / libraries / etc) using the GNU Make include directive, so that you end up with one giant Makefile that holds all rules for building the platform. Possibly to avoid the problems laid out in the paper Recursive make considered harmful.

  • Sébastien Wilmet: gedit crowdfunding

    The gedit text editor has a long history of development, it has been created in 1998 at the beginnings of GNOME. So it is one of the oldest GNOME application still alive and usually installed by default with Linux distributions that provide GNOME as their desktop environment. It is this – the fact that many Linux users know and have gedit installed – that motivates me to improve it, to make it a top notch core application. It is not an easy undertaking though, the codebase is old and large, and there are several underlying software components (libraries) that are critical for the main functioning of gedit.