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February 2020

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Destination Linux 162: Ikey Doherty Interview, Stuart Langridge Guest Host

    Topics covered in this episode:

    [...]
    Keeping Kids Safe Online

    [...]

    Interview:
    Ikey Doherty of Lispy Snake (formerly of Solus)

    Other Topics:
    GNOME 3.36 Preview
    ISP’s Claim Privacy Law Violates “Free Speech”

  • Daniel Stenberg: Expect: tweaks in curl

    One of the persistent myths about HTTP is that it is “a simple protocol”.

    [...]

    Background

    HTTP/1.1 is designed for being sent over TCP (and possibly also TLS) in a serial manner. Setting up a new connection is costly, both in terms of CPU but especially in time – requiring a number of round-trips. (I’ll detail further down how HTTP/2 fixes all these issues in a much better way.)

    HTTP/1.1 provides a number of ways to allow it to perform all its duties without having to shut down the connection. One such an example is the ability to tell a client early on that it needs to provide authentication credentials before the clients sends of a large payload. In order to maintain the TCP connection, a client can’t stop sending a HTTP payload prematurely! When the request body has started to get transmitted, the only way to stop it before the end of data is to cut off the connection and create a new one – wasting time and CPU…

    “We want a 100 to continue”

    A client can include a header in its outgoing request to ask the server to first acknowledge that everything is fine and that it can continue to send the “payload” – or it can return status codes that informs the client that there are other things it needs to fulfill in order to have the request succeed. Most such cases typically that involves authentication.

  • Environmental activist Shannon Dosemagen joins FSF conference keynote lineup

    Shannon Dosemagen is the second confirmed keynote speaker for the LibrePlanet conference. Dosemagen is the co-founder and current executive director of Public Lab, a nonprofit organization creating local environmental science solutions following the free software philosophy, and winner of the FSF's Award for Projects of Social Benefit. Shannon Dosemagen is an environmental health advocate and a community science champion, and is enthusiastic about free systems and technology that support the creation of a more just and equitable future. She is a previous Fellow at both the Harvard Berkman Klein Center for Internet and Society, and the Loyola University Environmental Communications Institute. During 2020, she will be a Fellow with the Shuttleworth Foundation, working on new concept.

    At LibrePlanet, Dosemagen will discuss her experience democratizing science to address environmental problem-solving. Her experiences and frustrations doing this work are very familiar to the free software community: "The work I do on the environment and health is being increasingly challenged by environmental deregulation and lack of cooperation. We're also seeing heightened pressure to drastically alter how society functions in an effort to curb the climate crisis. This is a profound moment, and critical to address at an event aptly themed 'Free the Future.'"

    "Shannon's work is very important, and is a testament to the success of community collaboration," says Zoë Kooyman, the FSF's program manager. "Public Lab's work towards free hardware solutions is a strong indicator of what the four freedoms can achieve, and how they can work towards a better future outside of software. Shannon is an experienced speaker and organizer, and we are proud to have her keynote at LibrePlanet."

  • GNU Health HMIS patchset 3.6.3 released with coronavirus COVID-19 coding information

    GNU Health 3.6.3 patchset has been released !

  • PCI Express 6.0 Reaches Version 0.5 Ahead Of Finalization Next Year

    Following the PCI Express 6.0 announcement from last summer that called for 64 GT/s transfer rates, version 0.5 of the PCIe 6.0 specification is now out for evaluation. 

    PCI Express 6.0 v0.5 is a "first draft" specification so that PCI-SIG members can review it and provide any feedback before delivering a complete draft in the months ahead and the v1.0 final draft in 2021. 

  • Mirantis Co-Founder Boris Renski Launches Enterprise LTE Network Startup

    There are no product details so far, but the plan is to leverage the newly opened CBRS spectrum to build 4G LTE wireless solutions and open-source most of the innovation.

Proprietary: Apple's 'Image' Obsession, TurboTax Scam, Nokia's Demise and Microsoft Being Microsoft

Filed under
Software
  • Apple Won't Allow Movie Villains to Use iPhones
  • TurboTax’s Bid to Buy Free Tax Prep Competitor Might Violate Antitrust Law, Experts Say

    TurboTax, the long-standing dominant player in the tax preparation software market, has recently faced a nascent threat to its lucrative business: A company that specializes in pitching its users financial products has entered the fray with a completely free tax prep service.

    This week, TurboTax’s parent company, Intuit, unveiled a solution to this problem: spending $7.1 billion to buy the rapidly growing upstart, Credit Karma, before it could become a major competitor.

  • Nokia to Weigh Strategic Options as Profit Pressure Mounts [Ed: Microsoft killed Nokia]

    The December announcement that Nokia Chairman Risto Siilasmaa would step down stirred speculation about deeper changes at the company. The firm is in a fierce rivalry with Ericsson and China’s Huawei Technologies Co., as the three dominant players seek to benefit from phone carriers’ investments in next-generation mobile networks.

  • 'Developers have lost hope Microsoft will do the right thing'... Redmond urged to make WinUI cross-platform

    Microsoft's roadmap for developing Windows applications is opposed by some programmers who want to see a cross-platform solution, rather than just being Windows-only.

    Spanish developer José Nieto this week raised an issue on GitHub, stating that WinUI, which Microsoft is positioning as “the native UI platform for Windows 10,” should target not only Windows, but also Linux, Mac, iOS, Android and WebAssembly – this last so it would also run in a web browser.

    This would go against the normal pattern, where a native UI platform is able to take advantage of all the features of the operating system, fits in seamlessly with its look and feel, and is optimized for performance. Supporting cross-platform is a burden that requires compromises.

openSUSE and LibreOffice: Citrix Workspace on openSUSE Tumbleweed, Open Build Service IP Changes, openSUSE + LibreOffice Conference and Navigator Improvements

  • Citrix Workspace on openSUSE Tumbleweed

    Some companies offer their employees to access their corporate computer work space remotely using a remote desktop connection. The company Citrix provides software for such a connection. To connect, the employees need the software Citrix Workspace on their terminal devices. The company provides on their download page also files for Linux including openSUSE. Unfortunately, their version 1912 from 12 December 2019 did not just work on my openSUSE Tumbleweed 64bit computer (and earlier versions I tried neither).

  • New IP addresses for build.opensuse.org

    People using this Open Build Service instance should normally not notice - but if you were crazy enough to add the old IP addresses to some firewall rules or configuration files, please make sure that you update your configuration accordingly.

  • Call for Papers, Registration Opens for openSUSE + LibreOffice Conference

    Planning for the openSUSE + LibreOffice Conference has begun and members of the open-source communities can now register for the conference. The Call for Papers is open and people can submit their talks until July 21.

  • Navigator imprevements by Jim Raykowski

    Jim Raikowski, one from LibreOffice's developers, has made many very nice Navigator improvements for Writer and Calc.

Debian: German Television, Freedb's Shutdown and Sparky News at Month's End

Filed under
Debian
  • Debian Edu on TV (NDR broadcast station, Germany)

    One of my Debian Edu customers has recently been on German television...

  • Freedb is closing its service

    Freedb, which is a free version of Cddb, and is used by the asunder cd-ripper (which I am the Debian maintainer of), is closing down it’s services March 31st.

  • Sparky news 2020/02

    The 2nd monthly report of 2020 of the Sparky project:

    • migration to a new, bigger vps done; make sure to install a new public key of Sparky repository -> https://sparkylinux.org/migration-to-a-new-vps/
    • Sparky 5.10.1 of the stable line released
    • Linux kernel updated up to version 5.5.7 & 5.6-rc3
    • added to our repos: Android Messages Desktop, MystiQ Video Converter
    • Nemomen keep translating Sparky Wiki pages to Hungarian, thanks a lot
    • Sparky 2020.02 and 2020.02.1 of the rolling line released
    • Sparky Special Editions 2020.02 GameOver, Multimedia & Rescue released

Mozilla: The Android Firefox Preview, Glean Spyware, and Firefox on Librem 5 (PureOS)

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Firefox Preview for Android - Interesting

    After I've published my recent series of Firefox articles, mostly the review of versions 71 & 72, and the important essay on why you should be using it as your primary browser, I got a bunch of emails from readers suggesting I take Firefox Preview for a spin. This seems to be the next-gen edition of Firefox for Android, designed to be faster, lighter and more appealing, and hopefully endear a bunch of hearts to Mozilla's effort.

    While I'm not too keen on anything touch, I still want to be able to have a hassle-free, stupidity-free browsing experience anywhere, including the mobile, so I set about testing Firefox Preview. As the test device, I used my Motorola Moto G6 phone, which ought to be fairly representative of the kind of results we should be seeing. Let us begin, then.

  • William Lachance: This week in Glean (special guest post): mozregression telemetry (part 1)

    As I mentioned last time I talked about mozregression, I have been thinking about adding some telemetry to the system to better understand the usage of this tool, to justify some part of Mozilla spending some cycles maintaining and improving it (assuming my intuition that this tool is heavily used is confirmed).

    Coincidentally, the Telemetry client team has been working on a new library for measuring these types of things in a principled way called Glean, which even has python bindings! Using this has the potential in saving a lot of work: not only does Glean provide a framework for submitting data, our backend systems are automatically set up to process data submitted via into Glean into BigQuery tables, which can then easily be queried using tools like sql.telemetry.mozilla.org.

    I thought it might be useful to go through some of what I’ve been exploring, in case others at Mozilla are interested in instrumenting their pet internal tools or projects. If this effort is successful, I’ll distill these notes into a tutorial in the Glean documentation.

  • Desktop Firefox in Your Pocket with the Librem 5

    The first part tells Firefox to use the Wayland display stack instead of X11, which has fullscreen support with keyboard input. Finally --no-remote is a workaround to a Firefox bug. which has already been fixed and will find its way into Debian, as well as the PureOS and the Librem 5 soon.

Ubuntu Switches to a Snap’d Software Store for 20.04

Filed under
Ubuntu

The upcoming Ubuntu 20.04 release will ship with a Snap version of Ubuntu Software app by default.

But while Ubuntu’s default software management tool will become pre-seeded Snap app starting in 20.04 existing Snap builds of Calculator, Characters, and Logs will be reverted to their repo versions.

As noted on Ubuntu Discourse, the ubuntu-desktop and ubuntu-minimal meta-packages now pull in the Ubuntu Software Snap app in place of the regular apt/repo version.

To be clear: this is not a new app store. It is the same Ubuntu Software store as currently shipped, and is still based on GNOME Software. It just packaged as a Snap application.

Read more

Also: Ubuntu 20.04 Screenshots Tour

KDE: Plans for Qt 6, KDE Progress, and Setback for Qt Wayland

Filed under
KDE
  • KF6 Progress Report: February Edition

    It’s been two months since my previous KF6 progress report. Clearly an update is long overdue, it’s time to make it happen!

    An actual Qt 6 is not published yet and we didn’t branch for KF6 yet either. Still as can be seen on the KF6 Workboard there are plenty of tasks in our backlog which can be acted upon now. No need to wait to participate, all the work done now will make the transition to KF6 easier later on anyway.

  • This month in KDE Web: January-February 2020

    This is the first post in a monthly series about improvements to the KDE websites. I plan to publish it every last Saturday of the month. Since a lot happened in January and I didn’t mention it anywhere, I will also mention those things in this post.

  • January and February in KDE PIM

    Following the post about what happened in KDE PIM in November and December by Volker, let’s look into what the KDE PIM community has been up to in the first two months of the new year. In total 23 contributors have made 740 changes.

  • Qt Wayland's Maintainer Is Leaving The Company

    While the Qt5 tool-kit on Wayland is in fairly good shape in recent times, the Qt Wayland module that provides the Wayland platform abstraction and helpers for assembly Qt-based Wayland compositors could run the risk of regressing.

    The future of QtWayland was brought up on the Qt mailing list this week with QtWayland developer Johan Helsing leaving The Qt Company. The hope is there will be no reduced work on Qt Wayland support especially with several companies relying upon it as well as the community, but it was Johan that carried out much of the heavy lifting for this toolkit on Wayland.

DXVK 1.5.5 Released

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Gaming
  • DXVK 1.5.5 Released With Many Game Fixes

    DXVK 1.5.5 is out this weekend as a big update to this Direct3D-over-Vulkan translation layer widely used by Linux gamers in running Windows games with decent speed.

    DXVK 1.5.5 is a big update contrary to its version number in bringing many game-specific improvements and other fixes. There is also expanded Direct3D support.

  • Direct3D to Vulkan translation layer 'DXVK' version 1.5.5 is out with lots of bug fixes

    Developer Philip Rebohle today announced the release of DXVK 1.5.5, bringing with it plenty of bug fixes for this impressive Direct3D to Vulkan translation layer.

    On the games side, quite a number had specific issues addressed with this release. You should find less issues running: Book of Demons, Close Combat, Cross Racing Championship, Dungeons and Dragons: Temple of Elemental Evil, Elite Dangerous, Evil Genius, F1 2019, Hyperdimension Neptunia U Action Unleashed, Just Cause 1, Lumino City, Saint's Row III / IV, Shade Wrath of Angels, Sins of a Solar Empire, Rocket League and Vampire: The Masquerade Bloodlines which should see improved performance.

    Another tweak was done for Skyrim, this time fixing both crashes and incorrect rendering with the "d3d9.evictManagedOnUnlock" option, they say this is "useful for Skyrim with a large number of mods as an alternative to ENBoost".

More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

GNU/Linux in Hardware, Arduino for Amazon Surveillance

  • Jetson Nano based system can be powered over Ethernet

    Aaeon’s compact, $475 “Boxer-8222AI” embedded box runs Linux on a Jetson Nano along with 4x USB 3.1 Gen2, HDMI 2.0, RS-232, M.2, mini-PCIe, 40-pin GPIO, and 2x GbE ports, one with PoE/PD. In April, Aaeon unveiled two compact systems: the Nvidia Jetson Xavier NX-based Boxer-8251AI and similar Jetson Nano based Boxer-8221AI. At the time, the company mentioned an upcoming Boxer-8222AI, but without offering details. It has now launched the system, which runs the Ubuntu 18.04 based ACLinux 4.9 on the Jetson Nano.

  •  
  • Run the Linux command line on your iPad

    Run a virtualized system using Alpine Linux with iSH, which is open source, but must be installed using Apple's proprietary TestFlight app

  • Light[s]well is a voice-controlled custom lighting installation

    Designed by Brian Harms of NSTRMNT, Light[s]well is a beautifully crafted 4’x8′ light installation for a triple-height living room that’s voice-responsive thanks to the Arduino Alexa skill. Light[s]well is constructed out of 80/20 extrusions and fasteners, with individually addressable LED strips embedded in the channels of the structure. 74 sheets of laser-cut cardstock make up the undulating light-diffusing wave pattern. According to Harms, 30 LEDs per meter strips were used to give each gap in the cardstock two LEDs per structural metal beam, for a total of six LEDs per gap. The LEDs are controlled by a MKR1000 (via a logic level shifter) along with the Arduino IoT Cloud.

IBM/Red Hat/Fedora Leftovers

  • Red Hat Runtimes update delivers new features for Open Hybrid Cloud

    It’s that time again: the time we announce the latest updates and new features in Red Hat Runtimes. The latest release, now available, builds on the work we have done over the past year to create cloud-native, modern applications, with a focus on our work in advancing Java. Red Hat Runtimes is a part of the Red Hat Application Services portfolio and is a set of products, tools and components for developing and maintaining cloud-native applications that offers lightweight runtimes and frameworks for highly-distributed cloud architectures, such as microservices or serverless applications. We make updates on a regular basis to meet changing customer demands while providing them with the technology necessary to make business-critical decisions while remaining innovative, competitive and flexible. Check out the rest of the post to learn more about the most recent updates to Red Hat Runtimes.

  • Red Hat adopts ROLIE protocol for automated exchange of security compliance assets

    This is a primer on the implementation of the ROLIE protocol. The purpose of this report is to recommend automated processes for information exchange of various security compliance and vulnerability management assets using the ROLIE protocol and its open source implementation, Golie. [...] The ROLIE standard helps to discover and consume security content in a standard and automated way. A ROLIE implementation like the golie tool can be used by security vendors or regular users to consume vendor provided CVE content. It can be used as a way to submit checklists to benchmark validation organizations, or it can be used to host subscription-model services around security content. Have ideas on where else the ROLIE standard or the golie tool can be used or enhanced? Want to get involved in the project? Please provide your input and ideas at the GitHub project. It is very important to note that the vision of the project and tooling is to be multi-platform and multi-vendor. Contributions in any way are always and very welcomed! Note: The ROLIE standard is still in its early stages of development, and the format may change should the standard change.

  • Looking back to the future: Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 as the OS trendsetter

    It’s hard to believe that we introduced Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 (RHEL 7) into the market more than six years ago. RHEL 7 balanced the enterprise need for stability and compatibility with that of tangible innovation. At general availability, we believe that we dispelled the myth that the operating system is "just a commodity" and redefined the Linux operating system.

  • Discover how to build intelligent, self-correcting supply chains

    The IBM Sterling suite offers solutions for supply chain and B2B collaboration. For complete product documentation, including information on how to extend the solutions, check out the following product Knowledge Centers.

  • JupyterLab, Elyra, and quantum at JupyterCon 2020

    For this year’s JupyterCon, which is held online October 5-17, we are excited to have the opportunity to share our experience with the Jupyter ecosystem and showcase some of the contributions IBM has made during the past year.

  • Fedora 32 : Can be better? part 014.

    The GTK documentation for C # is not very up to date, I tried to use a button to change a label and I failed first time. The Fedora team could improve this to develop the development side. Here's what I've managed to do so far with GTK.

  • Marcin 'hrw' Juszkiewicz: Upgraded to Fedora 33

    I am running Fedora on my desktop since started working for Red Hat. Kind of ‘eat your own dogfood’ style despite fact that I am not active in Fedora development for some time. Fedora 33 reached Beta status so it was time to upgrade.

  • RPM 4.16.0 Release Notes
  • RPM 4.16.0 released

    Version 4.16.0 of the RPM package manager has been released.

  • AI software stack inspection with Thoth and TensorFlow

    Project Thoth develops open source tools that enhance the day-to-day life of developers and data scientists. Thoth uses machine-generated knowledge to boost the performance, security, and quality of your applications using artificial intelligence (AI) through reinforcement learning (RL). This machine-learning approach is implemented in Thoth adviser (if you want to know more, click here) and it is used by Thoth integrations to provide the software stack based on user inputs. In this article, I introduce a case study—a recent inspection of a runtime issue when importing TensorFlow 2.1.0—to demonstrate the human-machine interaction between the Thoth team and Thoth components. By following the case study from start to finish, you will learn how Thoth gathers and analyzes some of the data to provide advice to its users, including bots such as Kebechet, AI-backed continuous integration pipelines, and developers using GitHub apps.

  • Fedora 33 Beta

    Today we are looking at Fedora 33 Beta. It comes fully packed with Gnome 3.38, Linux Kernel 5.68, and uses about 1.3-1.6GB ram when idling. It comes with Wayland and Btrfs File Manager by default and is a great Beta release. As seen in the video, it is not perfect yet, but I am sure that it will be fixed! Enjoy!

  • Fedora 33 Beta Run Through

    In this video, we are looking at Fedora 33 Beta. Enjoy!

Audiocasts/Shows: Destination Linux, FLOSS Weekly, Full Circle Weekly, LINUX Unplugged, mintCast and More

  • Destination Linux 193: Lenovo Giving Linux Some Love!

    This week the DL Triforce discuss the great news of more Linux hardware from Lenovo but is there a twist to this discussion? Microsoft is bringing Edge to Linux! Is this the death of Firefox as we know it? In the Gaming section, Amazon has decided to join the Cloud Gaming Space. Is this a good move for Amazon or is Cloud Gaming ahead of its time? Later in the show we’ll give you our popular tips/tricks and software picks. Plus so much more, coming up right now on Destination Linux.

  • FLOSS Weekly 598: DemocracyLab - Tech For Good

    DemocracyLab connects tech for good projects with skilled volunteers. This non-profit sets out to empower people who use technology to advance the common good. Doc Searls and Jonathan Bennett talk with Mark Frischmuth, the founder and Executive Director of DemocracyLab. They discuss how DemocracyLab is open to not just software developers but also designers, marketers, and financial analysts, which allows projects to get made and adapted by users. The talk about the importance of technologists stepping up and using their cognitive surplus to create a better world.

  • Full Circle Weekly News #183
  • Your New Tools | LINUX Unplugged 373

    We embrace new tools to upgrade your backup game, securely move files around the network, and debunk the idea that Windows will ever be based on Linux.

  • mintCast 344.5 – “Working” from Home

    In our Innards section, we go over the working from home slash home-office setups we have.

  • Will Vifm Be My New Terminal File Manager? Maybe!

    I've been using Lf for quite a while now but I've always had Vifm just out of sight and I thought I should finally give it a shot, now it's obviously not perfect and there are some things to get used to compared to switching from ranger to lf but I think ultimately this terminal file manager deserves the praise that it gets.

  • Make BTRFS The Default Filesystem On EVERY Linux Distro

    The Fedora 33 Beta is out, and the BTRFS filesystem is the new default. Schykle thinks it's the way forward for ALL Linux distributions.