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February 2020

Android as a Desktop

Filed under
OS
Android
  • Android-x86 project lets you run Android 9 Pie on a desktop, laptop, or table

    The team at the Android-x86 project Abba released their latest version of an Android based desktop operating system, offering an open source platform that can run Android 9 Pie on a desktop, laptop, or tablet with an Intel or AMD processor. Today the team announced the public release of Android-x86 9.0, the first stable release for Android-x86 9.0 (pie-x86). The prebuilt images are now available to download from Foss Hub and OSDN, check out the links below.

    The latest release includes support for 32-bit and 64-bit x86 processors, hardware-accelerated graphics with support for OpenGL ES 3.x on Intel, AMD, and NVIDIA GPUs, as well as experimental Vulkan graphics support, together with an optional Taskbar launcher, although you can also use the default Android-style launcher if you prefer. Other supported areas within the Android desktop operating system include WiFi, Bluetooth, Ethernet, camera, audio, and multitouch input.

  • Android-x86 9.0 Offering Android Pie Experience on Computer Released
  • Android is NOT Linux

    Android is NOT Linux Let's go over why Android is nothing like Linux. While it may use a Linux Kernel it is a completely different beast altogether.

OpenSUSE News Outsourced to Microsoft, Dominique Leuenberger's Report on Tumbleweed

Filed under
Microsoft
SUSE
  • Moving to the new News [Ed: News outsourced to Microsoft then]

    In an effort to make contributing to openSUSE easier, openSUSE News has moved from being a Wordpress application to a Jekyll static site developed directly on Github. Now you too can write an article, or a series of articles, by sending pull requests to the openSUSE/news-o-o repository.

  • Dominique Leuenberger: openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the week 2020/09

    During this week we released 4 snapshots (0220, 0222, 0224 and 0226) – an average week from that perspective, yet there have been some interesting and well-awaited updates in these snapshots:

    zsh 5.8
    Mesa 19.3.4 & Mesa 20.0
    libcap 2.32
    GNOME 3.34.4
    KDE Plasma 5.18.1
    LLVM 6 has been removed from the repository
    ncurses 6.2
    Linux kernel 5.5.5
    Mozilla Firefox 73.0.1: it will now launch in Wayland mode inside a Wayland session
    MariaDB 10.4.12

IBM/Red Hat/Fedora Leftovers

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Red Hat's SPICE 0.14.3 Remote Display System Now Supports Microsoft Windows

    The Simple Protocol for Independent Computing Environments (SPICE) is an important part of the Linux desktop virtualization stack and supported by the likes of KVM/QEMU, Xspice, and oVirt. With today's SPICE 0.14.3 now comes support for supporting Microsoft Windows guests.

  • We're headed for edge computing

    Every week seems to bring a new report on how edge computing is going to take over the world. But the question remains—will the edge computing phenomenon take over the world as predicted and, if so, how can businesses benefit from it?

    In this and future posts, we’ll demystify edge computing, examine its motivations, and explore best practices in creating scalable edge deployments and the role of open source at the edge. We'll also look at 5G and its impact on the telco industry, remote office/branch office, IoT, and other use cases.

  • SAP and Red Hat collaborate to provide AI/ML on Data Hub
  • OpenShift Commons Briefing: OpenShift Multi-Cloud Object Gateway Deep Dive with Eran Tamir (Red Hat)

    In this briefing, Red Hat’s Eran Tamir gives a deep dive on OpenShift Multi-Cloud Object Gateway which is a new data federation service introduced in OpenShift Container Storage 4.2. The technology is based on the NooBaa project, which was acquired by Red Hat in November 2018, and open sourced recently. The Multi-Cloud Object Gateway has an object interface with an S3 compatible API. The service is deployed automatically as part of OpenShift Container Storage 4.2 and provides the same functionality regardless of its hosting environment. Simplicity, Single experience anywhere

  • Open way and open source: enabling transparency and accelerating the enterprise

    What’s “obvious” to one person is often not obvious at all to another. If your university math professor writes a bunch of equations on the blackboard and says, “the proof is trivial,” you’d probably drop the class for fear of failing. When you work on a project, sharing as much as possible, with few assumptions about what is “obvious,” you help others succeed. And when one person succeeds, the team succeeds.

    Almost every project starts with a Proof-of-Concept (PoC), usually followed by a Minimum Viable Product (MVP). Everything starts very simply, but projects grow as the team finds value in the product or service and a need to scale out. As a project grows, the team needs to assign responsibility for different groups of people. This is the right way of growing, and the separation of responsibilities is 100% necessary. However, as groups start working on discrete functions, they can lose sight of the project vision as a whole. This misalignment, as with the executives in the parable, goes undetected because the teams aren’t transparent, instead diligently pursuing the idea they believe represents everyone’s vision.

    The solution to this is that each individual needs to be as proactive as possible when it comes to sharing their knowledge and work with the rest of the team. This can be done by sharing documentation, periodic presentations, and mentorship. Agile methods can definitely help, but no Agile or other software development lifecycle or business process can fix the siloed problem if people do not want to share. By realizing that helping others can help everyone, a successful team is born. Enabling transparency in an open way is critical to every project.

  • Fedora program update: 2020-09

    I have weekly office hours in #fedora-meeting-1. Drop by if you have any questions or comments about the schedule, Changes, elections, or anything else.

Revive your RSS feed with Newsboat in the Linux terminal

Filed under
Software
Web

Psst. Word on the web is that RSS died in 2013. That's when Google pulled the plug on Google Reader.

Don't believe everything that you hear. RSS is alive. It's well. It's still a great way to choose the information you want to read without algorithms making the decision for you. All you need is the right feed reader.

Back in January, Opensource.com Correspondent Kevin Sonney introduced a nifty terminal RSS reader called Newsboat. In his article, Kevin scratched Newsboat's surface. I figured it was time to take a deeper dive into what Newsboat can do.

Read more

KaOS 2020.02 Released with KDE Plasma 5.18 LTS and Linux 5.5, New Features

Filed under
GNU
KDE
Linux

The development team behind KaOS, a KDE-focused, desktop-oriented independent GNU/Linux distribution, released today KaOS 2020.02 as February 2020’s live ISO snapshot with all the latest software updates and technologies, as well as new features.

KaOS 2020.02 is here almost two months after January 2020’s snapshot and brings many of the recently released GNU/Linux technologies and Open Source software, starting with the KDE Plasma 5.18 LTS desktop environment.

In fact, KaOS 2020.02 includes all the latest KDE software, such as the Plasma 5.18.1 update, February 2020’s Applications update, and Frameworks 5.67.0, all compiled against the Qt 5.14.1 open-source and cross-platform application framework.

Read more

Introducing Jcat

Filed under
Software

Jcat is a gzipped JSON file of detached signatures. Because it’s gzipped it’s easy to compress and decompress in basically any language, and because it’s JSON it’s dead simple to parse and generate in any framework. There is a little overhead of some metadata (e.g. signing ID, creation time, etc) and but it’s all the kind of thing you can just edit in vim if you needed to. There’s also support for storing binary stuff like DER certificates (base64 to the rescue…), but if possible I’d like it to be all readable in a text editor. The jcat command line tool can import existing detached signatures into the Jcat file, and can also verify the existing .jcat file against all the files in a directory or archive. You can include multiple signatures for the same file (using the AppStream ID as the key) and of course sign multiple files using all the cryptographic engines you need. There’s also rudimentary support for actually creating signatures in the jcat command line client too, although it’s WIP for the GNUTLS engine and completely missing for GPGME at the moment.

This new thing also lets us fix another glaring issue in fwupd. Some companies can’t use PKCS-7, and some can’t use GPG for equally bad and nonsensical reasons – at the moment you need to specify the remote keyring when enabling a remote as we need to know if we need to download the metadata.xml.gz.asc or the .p7b version. Using a .jcat file allows to to not care, and just download one detached thing that can be used no matter how you’ve compiled your system. By adding SHA-256 as an additional not-to-be-used-for-trust engine, Jcat also lets you verify the download of your metadata and cabinet files even when you don’t have GPG or PKCS-7 available, which I know at least one company does on an IOT project. Jcat allows us to move the scary cryptographic verification code out of fwupd and makes the update-your-firmware codebase easier to maintain without worrying about potential landmines.

Read more

Also: Jcat: A New Alternative To Microsoft Catalog Files

6 awesome XFCE desktop themes to install

Filed under
GNU
Linux

XFCE is one of Linux’s “boring” desktops. It doesn’t have any fancy effects, it doesn’t use a lot of system resources, and the default themes are nothing to write home about. XFCE’s primary purpose is to get the job done and stay out of the way.

While many love that XFCE has no frills, and stays out of the way, it’s hard not to want to make the desktop look a little more modern. For this reason, we’ve created a list of 6 awesome XFCE desktop themes to install!

Read more

Games: Dwarrows, SteamVR and Ring Fit Adventure

Filed under
Gaming
  • Very sweet 3rd person city-building adventure 'Dwarrows' is out now

    With colourful visuals, super happy music and a family-friendly atmosphere, Dwarrows has officially launched with Linux support today powered by Unreal Engine from Lithic Entertainment. Note: Key provided to us by the developer.

    Another title successfully launched after crowdfunding, with their Kickstarter being a success back in 2016 (see more projects here). Lithic managed to gather about fifteen thousand Canadian Dollars, and after the wait is it worth it? Well, it's certainly nothing like I expected and that's a really good thing—it's quite wonderful. Not serious at all and full of charm.

  • Valve reveals SteamVR 1.10 with a brand new Dashboard

    Valve continue rapidly iterating on SteamVR, as they attempt to push the limits of what VR can do both on the hardware and software side with SteamVR 1.10 out now. Not a Beta release either, a proper new version.

    Quite a big update too, giving a huge revamp to the Dashboard that Valve claim "gets you into your games quickly". It has a new curved design that's closer for increased clarity, and presents a recent games list for jumping in right away. Looks pretty nice too.

  • Diving into the world of Ring Fit Adventure

    Continuing with my Ring Fit Adventure adventure1, these are the first full two weeks of working out with Ring Fit Adventure.

    My plan is to work our every work day, but this weekend I could not stop myself from trying out a few more mini-games. On the other hand, I skipped two days, but felt bad and missed the routine.

    Anyway, onwards with the adventure²!

Wine 5.3 Released

Filed under
Software
  • Wine Announcement

    he Wine development release 5.3 is now available.

    What's new in this release (see below for details):
    - More work towards Ucrtbase runtime support.
    - Full support for Unicode normalization.
    - Improvements in Shell Folders handling.
    - Various bug fixes.

    The source is available from the following locations:

    https://dl.winehq.org/wine/source/5.x/wine-5.3.tar.xz
    http://mirrors.ibiblio.org/wine/source/5.x/wine-5.3.tar.xz

    Binary packages for various distributions will be available from:

    https://www.winehq.org/download

    You will find documentation on https://www.winehq.org/documentation

    You can also get the current source directly from the git
    repository. Check https://www.winehq.org/git for details.

    Wine is available thanks to the work of many people. See the file
    AUTHORS in the distribution for the complete list.

  • Wine 5.3 Released With Various Improvements

    Wine 5.3 is out as the latest bi-weekly development snapshot on the road to Wine 6.0 next year.

    Notable this release is work coming together on Ucrtbase run-time support, which is the UCRT library used by Microsoft Visual C++ for compiler-independent components like the standard C library and various extensions. The Ucrtbase run-time support isn't yet wired up in full but it's getting there.

  • Compatibility layer Wine 5.3 is out with Unicode improvements and a number of bug fixes

    Hey, got any…grapes? Another development release for the compatibility layer Wine is out today, following their regular release cycle we have Wine 5.3.

More in Tux Machines

Audiocasts/Shows: Linux in the Ham Shack, Women In Linux Podcast

  • LHS Episode #355: Warp Two

    Hello and welcome to the 355th installment of Linux in the Ham Shack. In this episode, the hosts wrap up Field Day 2020 and then dive into other topics including: RSGB webinars, the WIA, the QSO Today Ham Expo, open-source COVID-19 tracking software, Linux Mint 20, ADS-B trackers for Raspberry Pi and much more. Thank you for listening and have a great week out there.

  • #wiLinux Podcast: Amy Rich | Director of Engineering

    Amy Rich has been an Ops person for over 25 years at a variety of companies, helped ship Firefox to hundreds of millions of users, owned her own consulting business, helped organize multiple conferences for USENIX, and written professionally on the topic of UNIX systems administration.

  • #WOMENINLINUX Podcast: Amy Rich – Redox

    On this episode of the #WomenInLinux Podcast we have Amy Rich! [...] In her head, she frames what she loves about her job as “bringing order from chaos.” Amy values being able to use her technical and professional skills to make a positive difference in the world. These days her job title reads “Sr. Director of DevOps” at Redox. and a member of the Board of Directors of the USENIX Association. In her spare time she’s a board/card game addict, Star Wars LEGO nerd, horrible guitar player, fan of music, books, and movies, and enjoy taking pictures of the places traveled.

  • #wiLinux Podcast: Denise Barreto | Community & Leadership

    Denise W. Barreto is an entrepreneur, author and TEDx speaker with over 20 years of leadership and marketing experience across multiple industries. As founder and managing partner of Relationships Matter Now her firm serves businesses of all sizes, non-profit and government agencies who want to better leverage their relationships to grow their bottom line through strategic planning, HR system infrastructure, organizational and leader development and inclusion and diversity strategy.

  • #WomenInLinux Podcast: Lynn Langit – BigData/Cloud Architect

    Lynn Langit creates big data and cloud architectures with AWS, Microsoft, Google, and OpenStack technologies. She also works with SQL Server, MongoDB, Google Big Query, Redis, Neo4j, and Hadoop. Lynn is also the cofounder of Teaching Kids Programming, and has spoken on data and cloud technologies in many countries. She is an ACM Distinguished Speaker.

  • #WomenInLinux Podcast: Julie Gunderson – Community Manager

    Former Community Manager for Taos. Julie Gunderson is a DevOps Advocate at PagerDuty, where she works to further the adoption of DevOps best practices and methodologies. She has been actively involved in the DevOps space for over five years and is passionate about helping individuals, teams and organizations understand how to leverage DevOps and develop amazing cultures. Julie has delivered talks at conferences such as DevOpsDays, Velocity, Agile Conf, OSCON and more, as well as being community moderator at opensource.com. Julie is also a founding member and co-organizer of DevOpsDays Boise.

Hardware: Arduino Nano, Advantech and Adafruit

  • Clockception combines 24 clocks to create one clock

    What if you were to use the hands of a clock not as an individual display, but as part of an array combines together to form digits? That’s the idea behind Clockception by creator “Made by Morgan,” which utilizes 48 servo motors to drive 24 clock-like faces for an 8×3 display. The build uses an Arduino Nano and three servo driver boards to control movement, along with a DS1302 RTC module to track time. The overall clock is constructed out of stained poplar, while the dial assemblies are 3D-printed.

  • Change the volume of any app on your PC with the turn of a knob

    Overall computer volume control is important, but what if you want to get more granular, adjusting sound from various applications individually? Rather than going through a series of menus and on-screen sliders, Ruben Henares’ Maxmix lets you do this on the fly. Based on an Arduino Nano, the simple yet stylish knob takes input from an encoder and button to cycle through and select a program. Just push down and then rotate to turn the volume up or down. Want to switch from Discord to Spotify? Click it again and repeat the process.

  • Atom C3000 net appliance offers options for 10GbE, PoE, WiFi 6, and 5G

    Advantech’s fanless, -20 to 70°C tolerant “FWA-1112VC” net appliance runs Linux on an Atom C3000 with 6x GbE or 4x GbE with 2x 10GbE SFP+ ports along with optional PoE and 3x M.2 for SATA, WiFi 6, and 4G/5G. Advantech has announced a highly customizable, IP40-protected desktop networking system with extended temperature support. The FWA-1112VC is described in the Electropages story where we found out about it as the latest in the company’s “entry and mid-level white boxes for SD-WAN and uCPE.”

  • QuickFeather Board is Powered by QuickLogic EOS S3 Cortex-M4F MCU with embedded FPGA (Crowdfunding)

    Yesterday, I wrote about what I felt what a pretty unique board: Evo M51 board following Adafruit Feather form factor, and equipped with an Atmel SAMD51 Cortex-M4F MCU and an Intel MAX 10 FPGA. But less than 24 hours later, I’ve come across another Adafruit Feather-sized Cortex-M4F board with FPGA fabric. But instead of using a two-chip solution, QuickLogic QuickFeather board leverages the company’s EOS S3 SoC with a low-power Cortex-M4F core and embedded FPGA fabric.

"ATGC" Aims To Offer Greater Garbage Collection Efficiency For F2FS

F2FS as the Flash-Friendly File-System for Linux continues to see a lot of interesting developments for this file-system beginning to appear on more Android devices and elsewhere given its feature set from flash optimizations to native encryption and compression capabilities. The newest F2FS feature work worth mentioning is support for age-threshold based garbage collection (ATGC). This ATGC garbage collection is geared to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the background garbage collection for the file-system by evaluating older candidates first based on a defined age threshold. Read more

GNUnet 0.13.0 released

We are pleased to announce the release of GNUnet 0.13.0. This is a new major release. It breaks protocol compatibility with the 0.12.x versions. Please be aware that Git master is thus henceforth INCOMPATIBLE with the 0.12.x GNUnet network, and interactions between old and new peers will result in signature verification failures. 0.12.x peers will NOT be able to communicate with Git master or 0.13.x peers. In terms of usability, users should be aware that there are still a large number of known open issues in particular with respect to ease of use, but also some critical privacy issues especially for mobile users. Also, the nascent network is tiny and thus unlikely to provide good anonymity or extensive amounts of interesting information. As a result, the 0.13.0 release is still only suitable for early adopters with some reasonable pain tolerance. Read more Also: Glibc-HWCAPS To Help With AMD Zen Optimizations, Other Per-CPU Performance Bits