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June 2020

Welcome to Lua 5.4

Filed under
Development

Lua is a powerful, efficient, lightweight, embeddable scripting language developed by a team at PUC-Rio, the Pontifical Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro in Brazil. Lua is free software used in many products and projects around the world.

Lua's official web site provides complete information about Lua, including an executive summary and updated documentation, especially the reference manual, which may differ slightly from the local copy distributed in this package.

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Also: Lua 5.4 Released With New Garbage Collection Mode, Warning System

GNU Radio Conference and Many GNU Releases

Filed under
GNU
  • Hardware Challengem Ham Radio

    We got a nice note from Michelle Thompson this week thanking us for mentioning the GNU Radio Conference in last week’s Links article, and in particular for mentioning the virtual CTF challenge that they’re planning. It turns out that Michelle is deeply involved in designing the virtual CTF challenge, after having worked on the IRL challenges at previous conferences. She shared a few details of how the conference team made the decision to go forward with the virtual challenge, inspired in part by the success of the Hack-A-Sat qualifying rounds, which were also held remotely. It sounds like the GNU Radio CTF challenge will be pretty amazing, with IQ files being distributed to participants in lieu of actually setting up receivers. We wish Michelle and the other challenge coordinators the best of luck with the virtual con, and we really hope a Hackaday reader wins.

  • June GNU Spotlight with Mike Gerwitz: Twelve new releases!

    adns-1.6.0
    bison-3.6.4
    chess-6.2.7
    gnun-1.0
    guile-3.0.4
    libmicrohttpd-0.9.71
    linux-libre-5.7-gnu
    mcsim-6.2.0
    mit-scheme-11.0.90
    parallel-20200622
    r-4.0.2
    shepherd-0.8.1

Chromium-based browsers pros and cons

Filed under
Google
Web

How much do you think about your internet browser? Not much, right? If it gets you to your target web destination, that’s all that matters. For most, it’s a choice between Chrome or Firefox, with Edge and Safari coming not far behind.

While most internet users opt for Chrome, many people don’t realize that many of the other leading browsers in the world are not so different from it. They use the Chromium source code.

While Chrome and Chromium are separate projects, one is Google’s proprietary web tool, and the other is open source. But there are a lot of similarities between the two.

Developers love Chromium. It’s easy to work with, has tons of extensions and API kits, and more. You can even swap out Chrome and use Chromium directly instead as your browser.

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mozregression GUI: now available for Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Moz/FF

This is an area where using telemetry in mozregression can help us measure the impact of a change like this: although Windows still dominates in terms of marketshare, Linux is very widely used by contributors — of the usage of mozregression in the past 2 months, fully 30% of the sessions were on Linux...

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3 Months From Home

Filed under
Site News

TM setup portrait


TUX MACHINES has been run from one single place over the past 3 months because of the COVID-19-induced lock-downs. We no longer travel far from home (it's impractical)... and we both work from home anyway.

The prolonged shut-down of businesses (they only reopened a fortnight ago) resulted in lack of access to some digital necessities, but that almost always meant more free time to rethink and reassess the workflow and the workspace with existing hardware (reshuffling what we already have, both new and old).

Last month I showed how the screens on my desk were split to handle multi-tasking. Last week I shuffled to portrait mode (as shown above). Rianne too uses 2 or 3 screens, but her setup is somewhat simpler. We basically both use a combination of RSS readers. I mostly use QuiteRSS and she uses Thunderbird and QuiteRSS in conjunction (best of both worlds). We're still hoping that an intern based in Africa will start participating soon. The pandemic has made access to the Internet a lot harder for him. He wants to cover programming and Web-related topics for us.

4MLinux 34.0 BETA released.

Filed under
GNU
Linux

4MLinux 34.0 BETA is ready for testing. Basically, at this stage of development, 4MLinux BETA has the same features as 4MLinux STABLE, but it provides a huge number of updated packages.

Road map:
June 2020 -> BETA
September 2020 -> STABLE
December 2020 -> OLD STABLE
March 2021 -> EOL

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Data centre automation for HPC

Filed under
Server
Ubuntu

Now physical servers are a lot easier to set up, provision and configure thanks to tools such as MAAS. For example, connecting servers and selecting which ones will be configured for networking and which for data, is as easy as clicking a button on a web UI. This may seem innocuous but it means that a server farm can be used for one project in the morning and for something completely different in the afternoon.

In reality, the server configuration is only the start, the base from which everything bubbles up. Re-configuration at the server level allows for use of higher-level tools such as LXD VMs, Kubernetes and Juju to quickly put together an environment with reusable code without needing to be a DevOps expert or having to wait for an expert to do it for you.

What we are going to see in the next few years is a growth of HPC with cloud native tools. Or, in other words, bringing cloud software tools and good developer experience into the world of HPC to make the operations easier.

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The Future of Linux: The Linux 5.9 Release, 5.8 Performance, Torvalds on Kernel Size

Filed under
Linux
  • Linux 5.9 Likely To See USB4 Support Improvements

    Linux 5.6 brought initial USB4 support that primarily was starting things off by basing things off the existing Thunderbolt 3 support in the kernel for which this latest USB standard is based. For the Linux 5.9 kernel later this summer it's looking like there will be further work on getting Linux's USB4 support into good shape ahead of hardware appearing in the months ahead.

    Via the Thunderbolt bleeding-edge branch has been a number of USB4 patches building up over the past week. Intel's Mika Westerberg, Kranthi Kuntala, and Rajmohan Mani have been working on these latest USB4 additions.

  • Linux 5.8 Bringing Some Performance Boosts For AMD Renoir Graphics

    Over the weekend I began running some benchmarks of the Linux 5.8 development kernel on the Lenovo Flex 5 laptop with Ryzen 5 4500U. One of the standouts so far for from this Linux 5.8 testing compared to the stable 5.6/5.7 kernel series is better Radeon graphics performance with the Renoir laptop.

  • Linus Torvalds on the future of Linux kernel developers and development

    The illustrious pair started with Hohndel asking about the large size of the recent Linux kernel 5.8 initial release. Hohndel wondered if it might have been so big because developers were staying home thanks to the coronavirus. Torvalds, who always worked at home, said, "I suspect 5.8 might be [so large] because of people staying inside but it might also be, it's just happened that several different groups ended up coming at roughly the same time, with new features in 5.8."

    While COVID-19 has slowed down many technologies, while speeding up other tech developments, it hasn't affected Linux development much at all. "None of my co-developers have been hugely impacted either. I was worried for a while because one of our developers was offline for a month or two. … [But,] it turned out that it was just RSI [repetitive strain injury], and RSI is kind of an occupational hazard to deal with." He added. "One of the things that is so interesting about the Linux community is how much it has always been email-based and remote, how rarely we get together in person."

    In any case, Torvalds trusts this new build. Indeed, he ran his end of the videoconference from his new developer machine running the first release candidate of 5.8.

More in Tux Machines

Ferdi: A Free & Open-Source Alternative to Franz & Rambox

A single application to help you manage multiple services comes in handy when you do not want to do everything on your browser. While technically, you can, it may not be the most organized way of doing things. Hence, options like Rambox and Franz are pretty popular cross-platform solutions to sign in to several services and access all of them at a glance. Even though they both are available for Linux (and we’ve covered them separately), they offer limited features for free. In contrast, Ferdi is a fork of Franz offering many premium functionalities for free while aiming to provide a better experience. Read more

How to Install Python 3.10 in Ubuntu and Other Related Linux

Planning to get the Python 3.10 installed for your work? Here's how to install Python 3.10 in Ubuntu and related distributions. Read more

today's leftovers

  • Newest Linux Optimizations Can Achieve 10M IOPS Per-Core With IO_uring - Phoronix

    Just one week ago Linux block subsystem maintainer Jens Axboe was optimizing the kernel to get 8 million IOPS on a single CPU core. He progressed the week hitting around ~8.9M IOPS per-core and began to think he was hitting the hardware limits and running out of possible optimizations. However, this week he is kicking things off by managing to hit 10 million IOPS!

  • Ubuntu Kylin 21.10 Quick overview #Shorts - Invidious

    A Quick overview of Ubuntu Kylin 21.10.

  • Reset Password On Any Linux Distro (No Root Needed) - Invidious

    Losing your access to your user account on Linux can be really frustrating but luckily resetting that lost password is actually incredibly easy but the process slightly changes depending on the bootloader you're using at least for the easy approach

  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 706

    Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue 706 for the week of October 17 – 23, 2021.

  • Rakudo Weekly News: 2021.43 Thank You

    Oleksandr Kyriukhin has released the 2021.10 version of the Rakudo Compiler, which includes all of the work of the new MoarVM dispatch mechanism. This is the culmination of more than 1.5 year work by many people, but mostly by Jonathan Worthington. A historic step forward that lays the groundwork on more efficient executing of Raku programs, and actually delivers on a number of improvements.

  • Team Profile by KDE's Cornelius Schumacher

    What makes a great team? One important factor is that you have a balanced set of skills and personalities in the team. A team which only consists of leaders won't get much work done. A team which only consists of workers will not work into the right direction. So how can you identify the right balance and combination of people? One answer is the Team Member Profile Test. It's a set of questions which team members answer. They are evaluated to give a result indicating which type of team member the person is and where it lies in the spectrum of possible types.

  • Some users on Reddit report that Windows 11 loses Internet connectivity when trying to connect to NordVPN.
  • Pat Gelsinger's Open-Source Bias, Intel's Pledge To Openness [Ed: Intel is openwashing again, but leaks from Intel show that Intel is a foe, not a a friend. It's also rather ironic that Intel puts an "open" letter in a proprietary site of Microsoft, which is viciously attacking Free software. Intel is a Microsoft booster.]

    Ahead of Intel's inaugural Intel Innovation event taking place virtually later this week, Intel CEO Pat Gelsinger published an open letter to an open ecosystem. In this open ecosystem letter, Gelsinger talks up opennness and choice, adding, "This is why I fundamentally believe in an open source bias, which powers the software-defined infrastructure that transformed the modern data center and ushered in the data-centric era."

Raspberry Pi and Arduino Leftovers

  • Fast Indoor Robot Watches Ceiling Lights, Instead of the Road

    To pull this off, [Andy] uses a camera with a fisheye lens aimed up towards the ceiling, and the video is processed on a Raspberry Pi 3.

  • Tackle The Monkey: Raspberry Pi Gets Round Screen | Hackaday

    You could argue that the project to add a round screen to a Raspberry Pi from [YamS1] isn’t strictly necessary. After all, you could use a square display with a mask around it, giving up some screen real estate for aesthetics. However, you’d still have a square shape around the screen and there’s something eye-catching about a small round screen for a watch, an indicator, or — as in this project — a talking head. The inspiration for the project was a quote from a Google quote about teaching a monkey to recite Shakespeare. A 3D printed monkey with a video head would be hard to do well with a rectangular screen, you have to admit. Possible with a little artistry, we are sure, but the round head effect is hard to beat. Honestly, it looks more like an ape to us, but we aren’t primate experts and we think most people would get the idea.

  • Move! makes burning calories a bit more fun | Arduino Blog

    Gamifying exercise allows people to become more motivated and participate more often in physical activities while also being distracted by doing something fun at the same time. This inspired a team of students from the Handong Global University in Pohang, South Korea to come up with a system, dubbed “Move!,” that uses a microcontroller to detect various gestures and perform certain actions in mobile games accordingly. They started by collecting many different gesture samples from a Nano 33 BLE Sense, which is worn by a person on their wrist. This data was then used to train a TensorFlow Lite model that classifies the gesture and sends it via Bluetooth to the host phone running the app. Currently, the team’s mobile app contains three games that a player can choose from.