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June 2020

OpenSUSE Leap 15.2 set for release

Filed under
SUSE

OpenSUSE Leap 15.2 is complete and ready for a planned release on July 2. Leap is the version based on SUSE Linux Enterprise, but with many updated packages; see the 15.2 features page for an overview of what's coming. "Leap 15.2 is filled with several containerization technologies like Singularity, which bring containers and reproducibility to scientific computing and the high-performance computing (HPC) world. Singularity first appeared in the Leap distribution in Leap 42.3 and provides functionality to build smallest minimal containers and runs the containers as single application environments. Another official package in Leap 15.2 is libcontainers-common, which allows the configuration of files and manpages shared by tools that are based on the github.com/containers libraries, such as Buildah, CRI-O, Podman and Skopeo. Docker containers and tooling make building and shipping applications easy and fast."

Read more

Also: openSUSE Leap 15.2 is Gold!

IPFire 2.25 - Core Update 146 released

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Security

The next Core Update for IPFire is available. It updates the IPFire kernel, enhances its hardening and adds mitigations for Intel's latest hardware vulnerabilities...

Arne has rebased the IPFire kernel on version 4.14.184 from the Linux kernel developers and integrated our custom patches into this release. It brings various stability and security fixes.

This kernel brings mitigations for processor vulnerabilities in Intel's processors and includes updates of Intel's microcode.

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Cadmus is a new Linux UI for managing microphone noise suppression

Filed under
Software

Are your voice chat friends getting bothered by your fancy new loud mechanical keyboard? Or perhaps you're doing an audio recording and need everything in the background to shutup - enter Cadmus.

I'm sure many of you have been there, getting distracted while playing an online game because one of your crew sounds like an elephant jumping on a keyboard while they furiously press WASD or angrily type in the chat. Noise suppression helps with anything remotely like that.

On Windows there's a lot of solutions, on Linux there's not so much that's actually user friendly. Cadmus aims to hopefully help a little there, giving Linux users a very simply notification icon UI to enable noise supression - using the PulseAudio Noise Supression Plugin from werman.

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Ubuntu and Devices

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Top laptops for day-to-day work you can buy in India

    However, it runs on the Ubuntu operating system. So, if you are looking for Windows, then you may consider other laptops.

  • Installing ROS in LXD Containers

    It’s the season for updates. The last few weeks have ushered in ROS 1 Noetic and ROS 2 Foxy, both of which target the recently released Ubuntu 20.04 Focal Fossa. As always, new releases come with trepidation: how can I install new software and test compatibility, yet keep my own environment stable until I know I’m ready to upgrade? This is one of the many good reasons to dive into containers

    In this blog post we’ll create a base LXD profile with the ROS software repositories and full graphical capabilities enabled. Launch containers to meet your robotics needs: everything from software development and system testing through robot operations can be covered within containers.

  • What is Apache Kafka and will it transform your cloud?

    Everyone hates waiting in a queue. On the other hand, when you’re moving gigabytes of data around a cloud environment, message queues are your best friend. Enter Apache Kafka.

    Apache Kafka enables organisations to create message queues for large volumes of data. That’s about it – it does one simple but critical element of cloud-native strategies, really well. Let’s look at the three significant benefits, challenges and use cases of Apache Kafka, and the easiest way to get it running in production.

  • Upcoming RTD1619 Media Players – Dune HD Pro 4K II, Zidoo Z9X, and Zidoo X

    Realtek RTD1619 hexa-core Cortex-A55 media SoC was first spotted in 2018 in the Linux source code. Since no products had been launched based on RTD1619, I had mostly forgotten about the processor until I wrote about RTD1395 powered Dune HD RealBox 4K.

    I was then informed about the upcoming Dune HD Pro 4K II, and a quick search reveals Zidoo is also working on its own RTD1619 media players with Zidoo Z9X and Zidoo X models.

    [...]

    Zidoo Z9X runs Android 9.0 and OpenWrt OS simultaneously just like in the company’s Zidoo X9S TV box where Android manages apps and multimedia functions, and OpenWrt Linux handles the NAS functions.

  • Whiskey Lake signage player supports dual 4K displays

    Axiomtek’s compact, Linux-friendly “DSP501-527” signage player is built around an 8th Gen CPU and supports dual 4K displays with DP++ and HDMI 2.0. Other features include 5x USB, GbE, M.2 M-key for NVMe, and M.2 E- and B-key slots for wireless or Myriad X AI.

    Axiomtek has launched a fanless, partially ruggedized digital signage player that supports dual 4K displays and supports Intel Myriad X technology. Aimed at digital signage applications including menu and directory boards, self-service kiosks, and video walls, the DSP501-527 runs Linux or Windows 10 IoT on Intel’s 8th Gen Whiskey Lake processors.

KDE: Web Site, SPDX and Krita

Filed under
KDE
  • GSoC'20 with KDE

    With the first month of the coding period almost over, I have been working on completing the first part of my GSoC project.

    I have been porting kde.org to hugo. The website is very old and has lots and lots of pages. It is even older than me! I have been working on porting these pages to markdown removing the old PHP syntax and adding improvements to the design, responsiveness and accessibility of the website.

    I have completed porting the announcements upto the year 2013. I ported the year 2014 as well but I replaced the formatted links into normal ones but I didn’t realise It would break the translations for the pages. So I may have to port these announcements again Sad . KDE provides a pot file to its translators and they provide translations in a po file in return. We use a custom extraction script to extract the strings to be translated from the markdown files. The translator is smart enough to ignore some changes to the strings but the changes to the links that I made would break it. It also doesn’t work well with HTML that isn’t inline. I will keep these things in mind in the future.

    I am also working on automating (RegEx is Awesome!) much of the work involved in porting these files which may make up for the time lost.

  • SPDX and the KDE FLA

    KDE repositories are switching over to SPDX identifiers following the REUSE.software specifications. This machine-readable form of licensing information pushes for more consistency in licensing and licensing information.

    Long, long ago I wrote some kind of license-checker for KDE sources, as part of the English Breakfast Network. The world has moved on since then, and supply-chains increasingly want to know licensing details: specifically, what exact license is in use (avoiding variations in wording that have cropped up) and what license-performative actions are needed exactly (like in the BSD license family, “reproduce the Copyright notice above”).

    Andreas Cord-Landwehr has been chasing license information in KDE source code recently, and has re-done tooling and overall made things better. So there’s now changes – via merge requests on our GitLab instance KDE invent – showing up.

    There is one minor thing of note which I’ve discussed with him, and which bears upon the Fiduciary License Agreement (FLA) that KDE e.V. has.

  • Phase 1 Evaluation Status Report

    It has been over a month since the start of GSoC. Phase #1 evaluations will start today. This post is to summarise all the work done by me during phase #1

Debian: MiniDebConfOnline 2020, BTS and Cinnamon 4.6 for Debian GNU/Linux

Filed under
Debian
  • MiniDebConfOnline 2020 - I'm a programmer, how can I help Debian
  • developer-reference challenge: get the bug count down to 0

    As of now, the BTS counts 52 bugs for src:developers-reference and I'd like to get this down to zero, because src:developers-reference is just documenting best practices and this should be easy and done well.

    So, I've been trying to keep the habit of fixing at least one bug per month and I also try to do one upload per month. And I very much welcome your patches, commits, MRs and bug reports, because else it will take more than 5 years. Though I'm hopeful, src:developers-reference is maintained by the debian group on salsa, which is like a thousand people.

  • Cinnamon 4.6 for Debian

    After a few rounds of testing in experimental, I have uploaded Cinnamon 4.6 packages to Debian/unstable. Nothing spectacular new besides the usual stream of fixes. Enjoy the new Cinnamon!

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • [LibreOffice GSoC] Week 4 Report

    The last week was the 4th week of coding weeks in GSoC program. So this report is final report before phase 1 evaluation . I continued adding support for the non supported items.

  • LibreOffice GSoC Week 4 Report

    Finally, the patch I worked on is merged thanks to my mentor(Muhammet Kara). You can easily access the patch, from here Last Week I marked this feature as an experimental feature. Hamburger button(gear button) is added. Some arrangements have been made for translation in UI elements. There was an error with iOS and Android build. But this problem is solved thanks to Tor Lillqvist and Miklos Vajna. There is a bug with Customize Dialog.

  • Draft of my perf book is ready!

    It has been a long journey! I was silent for a while, haven’t posted regularly on my blog. But don’t worry, I’m fine. Instead, I took this situation around coronavirus and focused on writing a book “Performance Analysis and Tuning on Modern CPU”. I started writing this book almost a year ago, so I’m happy I finally can show something to the people. Right now, the early draft is ready and I’m welcoming everybody to review the book and maybe even add something to it. I know a lot of people are struggling right now, so I decided to make the book FREE for all. Eventually, everyone will be able to download PDF version of it.

  • Daniel Stenberg: curl ootw: –remote-time

    --remote-time is a boolean flag using the -R short option. This option was added to curl 7.9 back in September 2001.

  • 6 ways HTTP/3 benefits security (and 7 serious concerns)

    HTTP3, the third official version of hypertext transfer protocol (HTTP), will not use the transmission control protocol (TCP) as did its predecessors. Instead, it uses the quick UDP internet connections (QUIC) protocol developed by Google in 2012.

    QUIC is a transport layer protocol based on a multiplexed version of user datagram protocol (UDP) connections. Unlike TCP, UDP does not follow the TCP three-way handshake, but uses a single UDP roundtrip. Thus, the QUIC protocol exponentially improves any web component's network performances as it uses UDP for every connection between the user-agent and the web server. Also, QUIC relies on multiplexing to manage multiple interactions between the user-agent and server seamlessly over a single connection, without any one blocking another, thus helping with performance improvements compared to its predecessors.

  • Practical Open Source Training from ASC Praktijkleren

    FOSSlife: Please give our readers a brief background of Stichting Praktijkleren. How did this organization get started and why?

    Hans Blankendaal: Stichting Praktijkleren is the Academy Support Centre (ASC) in the Netherlands that promotes up-to-date ICT skills in education. Stichting Praktijkleren is a national foundation with 43 academies as members, and it delivers materials for 4,500 teachers and 60,000 students. It came about in 2006 through the initiative of several regional training centers. As of 2018, the activities of the former Netherlands Academy Support Centre have been transferred to Stichting Praktijkleren and continued under the name of ASC Praktijkleren.

    Generally, ASC Praktijkleren supports regional training centers in the field of in-school and out-of-school work-based learning. In collaboration with the teachers at these training centers, Stichting Praktijkleren develops examination products and vocational learning materials and provides support for both students and teachers in the form of advice and mentoring, training, workshops, and conferences.

  • OpenUK Awards Close Tomorrow

    Individual, young person or open source software, open Hardware or open data project or company

    The awards are open to individuals resident in the UK in the last year and projects and organisations with notable open source contributions from individuals resident in the UK in the last year.

Programming Leftovers

Filed under
Development
  • +1 "use v7;" in Perl 7

    This syntax is the history of Perl and is also a mechanism for maintaining backward compatibility with newer versions of Perl.

    The reason this was not used is simply the small granularity.

    I don't remember much about Perl, so I can't tell the difference between use v5.20 and use v5.30.

    And because the warnings and utf8 aren't turn on, I couldn't find a meaning to actively use it.

    use v7; is very easy to understand.

    use v7;
    Imagine an application user actively uses it instead of writing use strict, use warnings, use utf8;, use feature'say', ....

  • The [Perl] Weekly Challenge #066

    The much awaited event, **Conference in the Cloud” took most of my free time. Having said that I still managed to do Live Coding YouTube videosfor Divide Integers and Power Integers.

    I really enjoyed both tasks, specially Power Integers. It didn’t take long to solve both tasks. I was able to get it done by midweek. But for YouTube video, I had to wait until the conference was over. Thanks to the Chief Editor of Perl Weekly newletter editorial note, I now have 67 subscribers to my YouTube Channel. I would like to thank each and every subscriber. I promise to do regular video every week.

  • Using Bash traps in your scripts

    It's easy to detect when a shell script starts, but it's not always easy to know when it stops. A script might end normally, just as its author intends it to end, but it could also fail due to an unexpected fatal error. Sometimes it's beneficial to preserve the remnants of whatever was in progress when a script failed, and other times it's inconvenient. Either way, detecting the end of a script and reacting to it in some pre-calculated manner is why the Bash trap directive exists.

  • Oracle Helidon 2.0 reaches general availability

    Global enterprise database and software vendor, Oracle, has announced the general availability of Helidon 2.0, a set of Java libraries simplifying microservices development.

  • Some Open-Source Projects Begin Quickly Working Towards macOS ARM64 Support

    While the first MacBooks / Macs with Apple's 64-bit ARM chips won't be shipping to consumers until around the end of the year and Apple is only sending out a limited number of developer systems, some open-source projects have already been making the necessary build system changes and other preparations for 64-bit ARM Mac builds. This work can be started by untangling assumptions in some of these projects that when building for macOS/Darwin means x86_64 and in some cases better modularizing their logic where they support iOS already with similar chips to what will be appearing in these future computers. Changes can also be started around "fat" binaries for supporting macOS builds that support both x86_64 and ARM64/AArch64.

  • Building a startup using Crystal and Lucky

    Crystal and Lucky are not, in my opinion, ready for the inexperienced programmer. With over 40 years of programming experience, I have still faced challenges.

    The power of Crystal’s macro language means that it is used extensively in packages as powerful as the Lucky web platform. Unfortunately, this means that your programming errors are reported where they occur somewhere in a macro expansion, rather than where you have made them – as you could expect were you calling into functions and methods rather than macros. The result is that error messages resulting from my use of Lucky are often simply indecipherable, yielding neither the location of their origin or, sometimes, even any information about the erroneous statement rather than some macro transformation of that statement. Since the macro system is a code transformation machine, its arguments are not naturally as tightly typed as the rest of the Crystal language. Achieving good error reports for Lucky may require manually-added code to more tightly check the arguments to every macro. Fortunately, the macro mechanism does provide the framework to do such checking, AST nodes yield type information and the file name and line number of where they originate. I don’t know if there is anything that the compiler developers can do to improve error messages regarding macro expansions.

  • Towards greater ecological validity in security usability

    When you are a medical doctor, friends and family invariably ask you about their aches and pains. When you are a computer specialist, they ask you to fix their computer. About ten years ago, most of the questions I was getting from friends and family as a security techie had to do with frustration over passwords. I observed that what techies had done to the rest of humanity was not just wrong but fundamentally unethical: asking people to do something impossible and then, if they got [cr]acked, blaming them for not doing it.

Security: Patches, Josh Bressers, FUD and NIST 800-53 Revision 4 Mappings for Wind River Linux

Filed under
Security
  • Security updates for Monday

    Security updates have been issued by Debian (libtasn1-6, libtirpc, mcabber, picocom, pngquant, trafficserver, and zziplib), Fedora (curl and xen), openSUSE (bluez, ceph, chromium, curl, grafana, grafana-piechart-panel,, graphviz, mariadb, and mercurial), Oracle (nghttp2), Red Hat (microcode_ctl), SUSE (mutt, python3-requests, and tomcat), and Ubuntu (glib-networking and mailman).

  • Josh Bressers: Episode 203 – Humans, conferences, and security: let me think and get back to you in a bit

    Josh and Kurt talk about human behavior. The conversation makes its way to conferences and the perpetual question of if a conference is useful or not. We come to the agreement the big shows aren’t what they used to be, but things like BSides are great experiences.

  • New Chinese malware targeting Windows, Linux machines [Ed: So.... do not install it?]
  • Chinese malware ''Golang'' targeting Windows, Linux machines

    Cyber-security researchers have identified a new variant of cryptominer malware from China-based hackers that is targeting both Windows and Linux machines.

    Called Golang, the new malware variant is aiming at mining Monero, an open-source cryptocurrency created in 2014, according to US-based cyber security firm Barracuda Networks.

  • This Chinese malware is affecting Windows, Linux devices: Here's how
  • New Republican bill latest in long line to force encryption backdoors

    In what seems like Groundhog Day when it comes to encrypted communications, a group of Republican senators last week introduced the Lawful Access to Encrypted Data Act, which aims to end the use of so-called “warrant-proof” encrypted technology by terrorists and criminals. Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Lindsey Graham (R-SC), Tom Cotton (R-AR) and Marsha Blackburn (R-TN) introduced this latest measure to find a way for law enforcement to gain access to devices and data that are protected by unbreakable encryption methods.

    [...]

    The efforts by lawmakers and federal law enforcement agencies to force Silicon Valley and the tech industry to build backdoors into encrypted devices and communications go back to 1993 when the Clinton Administration’s proposed to create a “Clipper Chip” so the NSA could intercept encrypted voice communications. Since then, a number of proposals to bypass or otherwise negate encryption have been introduced and failed.

    The best known of these anti-encryption efforts is the legal fight waged by former FBI Director James Comey with Apple to force the Cupertino giant into helping the Bureau break into the iPhone of a mass shooter in San Bernardino. Most recently, a bipartisan bill, the EARN-IT Act, which is also backed by Senator Graham, has been widely condemned as a sneak attack on end-to-end encryption.

    The Lawful Access to Encrypted Data Act comes after Attorney General William Barr coined a new euphemistic phrase for encryption backdoors, “lawful access,” and began promoting the idea of court-authorized access to the content of encrypted communications. It’s no surprise, then, that Barr is an enthusiastic backer of the bill.

  • Ramping up security options with new NIST 800-53 Mappings

    “More than ever, organizations must balance a rapidly evolving cyber threat landscape against the need to fulfill business requirements.” To that extent, Wind River has NIST 800-53 Revision 4 mappings for VxWorks, Wind River Linux, and Wind River + Star Lab Titanium showing 100% coverage of the applicable controls

    These mappings are in a database format, so that they can be directly consumable by our customers’ requirements management tool for their efforts in showing compliance to the allocation of the controls to their system. Our mappings are expanding on our on-going Security Technical Implementation Guide (STIG) work for both VxWorks and Wind River Linux. This ensures maximum value to our customers and minimizes disruption to the configuration of their platforms.

More in Tux Machines

Kernel and Graphics: Intel, AMD, and NVIDIA

  • Intel teases 'software-defined silicon' with Linux kernel contribution – and won't say why

    Intel has teased a new tech it calls "Software Defined Silicon" (SDSi) but is saying almost nothing about it – and has told The Register it could amount to nothing. SDSi popped up around three weeks ago in a post to the Linux Kernel mailing list, in which an Intel Linux software engineer named David Box described it as "a post-manufacturing mechanism for activating additional silicon features".

  • RadeonSI Lands Another "Very Large" Optimization To Further Boost SPECViewPerf - Phoronix

    In recent months we have seen a lot of RadeonSI optimizations focused on SPECViewPerf with AMD seemingly trying to get this open-source OpenGL driver into very capable shape moving forward for workstation GL workloads. Hitting Mesa 22.0-devel today is yet another round of patches for tuning SPECViewPerf.

  • Vendors Including NVIDIA Talk Up New OpenCL Extensions For Vulkan Interop, NN Inference - Phoronix

    Last Friday night we spotted OpenCL 3.0.9 with several new extensions included. Today The Khronos Group is formally announcing these latest OpenCL additions focused on Vulkan interoperability as well as neural network inferencing. These new extensions for OpenCL 3.0 include an integer dot product extension for neural network inferencing (cl_khr_integer_dot_product) with a focus on 8-bit integer support.

  • RadeonSI Enables NGG Shader Culling For Navi 1x Consumer GPUs - Phoronix

    As another possible performance win for RadeonSI Gallium3D as AMD's open-source Radeon OpenGL driver on Linux systems is enabling of NGG culling for Navi 1x consumer graphics processors rather than limiting it only to newer Navi 2x (RDNA2) GPUs. Merged on Monday was a patch to enable shader culling for Navi 1x consumer SKUs with no longer limiting it to Navi 2x / GFX10.3 or when using various debug options. This culling was also enabled for Navi 1x GPUs but only for the "Pro" graphics SKUs.

Databases: Managing Database Migrations, PostgreSQL-Related Releases

KDE Plasma 5.18.8, Bugfix Release for October

Plasma 5.18 was released in February 2020 with many feature refinements and new modules to complete the desktop experience. Read more

today's howtos

  • Speak to me! – Purism

    My trusty laptop’s speakers gave up the ghost. I don’t like to sit around in headphones all the time, I don’t have any other speakers, and the replacements are still being manhandled by the postman. I’d get used to the austerity if I hadn’t started missing calls from a friend. That’s unacceptable! But what am I supposed to do? Buy extra gadgets just to throw them away after a week? Nope, I’m not that kind of a person. But hey – I have a Librem 5! It has a speaker. It’s open. I have control over it, and I’m a hacker too. So I should be able to come up with a hack to turn it into a speaker for my laptop, right? Pulseaudio to the rescue. I look through the guide. There it is: forwarding audio over a network.

  • How To Install CSF Firewall on Debian 11 - idroot

    In this tutorial, we will show you how to install CSF Firewall on Debian 11. For those of you who didn’t know, CSF is also known as “Config Server Firewall” is a free and advanced firewall for Linux systems. We should use ConfigServer Security & Firewall (CSF) since this CSF have more advanced and comprehensive features than other firewall application such as UFW, Firewalld, or Iptables. Compared to the other Linux firewall application, CSF is more user-friendly and effective which is mostly used by web hosting providers. This article assumes you have at least basic knowledge of Linux, know how to use the shell, and most importantly, you host your site on your own VPS. The installation is quite simple and assumes you are running in the root account, if not you may need to add ‘sudo‘ to the commands to get root privileges. I will show you through the step-by-step installation of the ConfigServer Security & Firewall (CSF) on a Debian 11 (Bullseye).

  • What are the differences between SQL and MySQL | FOSS Linux

    Due to many organizations, businesses, companies, and firms making an online presence, databases have become the core requirement for their daily operations. A database in a layman’s language is defined as a collection of data stored and organized electronically to ensure easy retrieval, access, management, and manipulation of business data. Most business successes depend on databases since they aid in storing essential and relevant data in a central position. Besides, databases also help facilitate communication of crucial business info such as employee profiles, sales transactions, customer profiles, marketing campaigns, product inventory, etc. Furthermore, databases have ensured that the company’s data is secure through various authentication mechanisms like access specifiers, user logins, and sign-ups. This article will talk about the difference between the two popular relational databases SQL and MySQL.

  • How to install Funkin' Psych Engine on a Chromebook

    Today we are looking at how to install Friday Night Funkin' Psych Engine on a Chromebook. Please follow the video/audio guide as a tutorial where we explain the process step by step and use the commands below.

  • How to Use an SSH Key with Non-root Users - Unixcop

    You can SSH to your Linux instance as root with the key. However, the key doesn’t work for non-root users. So we will illustrate two methods to use SSH keys with non-root users.

  • Allow Port Through Firewall in Ubuntu 20.04 - Linux Nightly

    Ubuntu comes with ufw (uncomplicated firewall) installed by default. This is a frontend for iptables/nftables, the built-in Linux firewall, and is meant to make firewall management a bit easier. In this guide, you’ll see how to add rules to the firewall to open ports and allow certain services to have access through the firewall on Ubuntu.

  • Some regex tests with grep, sed and AWK

    In my data work I regularly do searching and filtering with GNU grep (version 3.3), GNU sed (4.7) and GNU AWK (4.2.1). I don't know if they all use the same regex engine, but I've noticed differences in regex speed between these three programs. This post documents some of the differences.

  • Upgrade to Fedora 35 from Fedora 34 using DNF – If Not True Then False

    This is guide, howto upgrade Fedora 34 to Fedora 35 using DNF. This method works on desktop and server machines. You can also upgrade older Fedora installations (example Fedora 33/32/31/30) directly to Fedora 35. I have tested this method on several machines, but if you have problems, please let me know. Always remember backup, before upgrade!

  • Jenkins: Basic security settings - Anto ./ Online

    Jenkins contains sensitive information. Thus it must be secured, like any other sensitive platform. Thankfully Jenkins provides you with many security options. This guide will show you all the essential bits that you need to know. You access these features on the Configure Global Security page under manage Jenkins.

  • LDAP query from Python · Pablo Iranzo Gómez's blog

    Recently, some colleagues commented about validating if users in a Telegram group were or not employees anymore, so that the process could be automated without having to chase down the users that left the company. One of the fields that can be configured by each user, is the link to other platforms (Github, LinkedIn, Twitter, Telegram, etc), so querying an LDAP server could suffice to get the list of users. First, we need to get some data required, in our case, we do anonymous binding to our LDAP server and the field to search for containing the ‘other platform’ links.