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June 2020

Transmission – A Cross-Platform BitTorrent Client for Linux

Filed under
Linux
OSS

Transmission is a free cross-platform BitTorrent client built to be simple to use, lightweight, secure, and reliable. The open-source BitTorrent client just received a major update since 2018 in the form of version 3.0 and it is now packing a ton of function enhancements, bug fixes, and performance improvements.

The latest Transmission ships with a new app icon on Linux platforms alongside a symbolic variant for indicating the app is running in GNOME’s top panel. Be on the lookout to know whether your theme overrides the display setting if you’re using a custom theme.

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DownZemAll! – Qt-based download manager

Filed under
OSS
HowTos

In the past few weeks, we’ve written reviews of open source software designed to allow downloading videos from YouTube and other similar services without needing to fire up a web browser. We raved over two command-line tools — youtube-dl and You-Get, and also gave a warm reception to Tartube, a GUI tool.

These tools don’t really fall within the definition of a download manager. This term is usually ascribed to software that manages a broader range of files over the internet.

This article examines DownZemAll! (DZA!), an open source standalone download manager. The project also develops a browser extension which works with Firefox and Chrome. The program is a rewrite of DownThemAll!, although that software only offered a browser extension. DZA! can run independently of a web browser.

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A minimalist Mac terminal for Linux fans

Filed under
Linux

I have a confession to make: I have been a Mac user for more than 10 years now. At first, I felt a little shame, given my strong Linux background, but the Mac gives me a Unix-like shell and a great window manager. Because of that history, I have a mix of features that will run on macOS but feel familiar to Linux users. There's no reason it can't port over to Linux (and it has!)...

For a long time, my preferred terminal was the basic built-in Terminal.app, but I recently switched to iTerm2 because it has much better customization and profile support. One of its key wins for me is that it's easy to transplant settings from Mac to Mac. For daily use, I prefer the Solarized Dark theme, but for presentations, I have a separate profile that enlarges the text and uses a plain black background with more vibrant colors.

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Use intent parsers for your open source home automation project

Filed under
OSS

In part 1 and part 2 of this series on the Mycroft open source voice assistant, I laid the groundwork for learning how to create a skill. In part 3, I walked through creating an outline for a skill and recommended creating the skill in pure Python first to ensure the methods work as intended. That way, when things go wrong, you know it is related to how your Mycroft skill is constructed and not the code itself.

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Download Linux Mint 20 LTS Ulyana with Mirrors, Torrents and Checksums

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu
HowTos

Following Ubuntu 20.04 LTS release, quickly this month Linux Mint 20 just released as Long Term Support version codenamed Ulyana with its Cinnamon, MATE, and XFCE editions. This release will be supported for five years until 2025. This list sums up all necessary download links, mirrors, torrents, and checksums. This also includes guides to download via torrents, verify your obtained files, make the installation media and install this friendly and amazing computer operating system. Go ahead!

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Five Favorite Xfce Panel Applets

Filed under
GNU
Linux
HowTos

Here you go, it’s both a bit of a tutorial on how to use Xfce’s panel applets, as well as something of an in-depth look at five of our writer’s favorites.

The Xfce Desktop Environment might be one of Linux’s best kept secrets. Sure, everybody’s heard of Xfce, because on most lists it’s usually the first “alternative” DE, listed right after mainstreamers KDE and Gnome. But unless you’ve actually looked at it or used it, you might think it’s a bare bones simple DE that’s much too basic to be useful.

That’s partially the fault of open source websites, which much to the chagrin of Xfce devs, nearly always refer to it as “minimalist,” or as a desktop intended for older hardware. This leaves some people thinking that Xfce is old school and offers nothing but a bare-bones experience, something like any number of simple Linux windows managers, or even Windows 3.1.

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The 10 Best Gentoo Linux Derivatives To Explore in 2020

Filed under
Linux
Gentoo

Gentoo Linux derivatives can be the ideal choice for the professional Linux users who don’t want to compromise about the system stability and performance. Some of you might know nothing about Gentoo Linux. Unlike other Linux distributions like Ubuntu, Kali, etc., Gentoo is quite unfamiliar...

Only the veteran Linux users know about this. And, the people who know about its potential hardly go back to any other distributions. The exclusivity of the Gentoo Linux is that you need to build the whole flashable image from the source code. That sometimes may require a few days based on your machine’s strength.

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Review: GoboLinux 017

Filed under
OS
Reviews

The GoboLinux project develops a distribution with an unusual goal: reorganizing the operating system's filesystem. The project introduces itself as follows:
GoboLinux is an alternative Linux distribution which redefines the entire filesystem hierarchy. In GoboLinux you don't need a package database because the filesystem is the database: each program resides in its own directory.
In other words, instead of a package manager placing executable files in /usr/bin, libraries in /usr/lib, and other resources in /usr/share, a program's files are all stored in one tree, such as /Programs/Firefox or /Programs/LibreOffice. This way the user, and package utilities, can remove software by deleting a single directory rather than keeping track of where individual files have been installed.

GoboLinux uses the the Awesome window manager, which provides a lightweight graphical interface. Version 017 of Gobo removes Python2 in favour of Python3, and also removes GTK2 for GTK3 on the ISO. Audio management is now handled by PulseAudio.

Gobo makes available one edition of the distribution for 64-bit (x86_64) computers. The download is 1.9GB in size. Booting from this media brings up a series of text-based menus. These menus ask us to select one of six languages from a list, then select our keyboard's layout. With these questions answered we are presented with a text console where we are automatically logged into the root account. A message appears above the command line prompt which lets us know we can run "startx" to open a graphical user interface. The text also explains how to launch the system installer from either the command line or from the Awesome window manager.

Opening the Awesome environment places a panel at the top of the screen. We can find an application menu in the upper-left corner and the system tray in the upper-right. The wallpaper is mostly black with abstract designs drawn on it. The background appears to be dynamically drawn rather than a fixed image. The volume icon is interesting in that clicking on it changes the colour of the icon (toggling between green and red) and this appears to mute audio.

The application menu in the live environment contains very few entries. Most of these manage or adjust the Awesome session. I feel it worth noting that to customize Awesome we need to edit a text file, there isn't any point-and-click settings panel. There is a menu entry to open the Awesome manual. Trying to access the manual caused a window to open for a second, then immediately crash without showing the requested documentation or an error.

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More in Tux Machines

Intel Announces 12th Gen Core "Alder Lake" CPUs, Linux Tests Forthcoming

Intel is using their inaugural Intel Innovation virtual event today to formally announce the highly-anticipated 12th Gen Core "Alder Lake" processors. These first desktop processors built on their "Intel 7" process and employ a hybrid architecture will be available in retail channels next week. Today we can talk more about Alder Lake specifications and features while our Linux performance benchmarks and support analysis will come once the Alder Lake review embargo expires next week. While there have been many Alder Lake leaks in recent weeks/months and a number of features disclosed back during Architecture Day, today marks the official unveil for the next-gen Intel Core processors. This is a very exciting transition as they have now shifted to their Intel 7 manufacturing process, the hybrid architecture provides a combination of high performance and low power cores depending upon needs, and Intel is at the forefront now in delivering DDR5 memory and PCIe 5.0 to the masses. When it comes to performance, Intel claims Alder Lake can deliver up to two times the performance of prior generation processors for content creation workloads. Meanwhile when it comes to the generational performance uplift for the P (Performance) cores it's said to be around 19%. Read more

Stable Kernels: 5.14.15, 5.10.76, 5.4.156, 4.19.214, 4.14.253, 4.9.288, and 4.4.290

I'm announcing the release of the 5.14.15 kernel.

All users of the 5.14 kernel series must upgrade.

The updated 5.14.y git tree can be found at:
	git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-5.14.y
and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser:
	https://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-s...

thanks,

greg k-h
Read more Also: Linux 5.10.76 Linux 5.4.156 Linux 4.19.214 Linux 4.14.253 Linux 4.9.288 Linux 4.4.290

Murena smartphones and cloud will protect our privacy

More than ever the market is demanding a new approach for digital products: more and more people around the world want something different, more ethical, more sustainable, with real guarantees about personal data protection. Four years ago, I wanted to break free from Google and Apple, and therefore we created the “eelo” project, with the simple idea that a different mobile operating system and associated cloud services like email or cloud storage could be possible in this world. Followed by an amazing community of supporters, contributors and now users, the project progressed quickly, and became a reality by the end of 2018. The same year, we had to suddenly abandon our initial project name for a temporary name: /e/. Sometimes, temporary things last longer than expected. And despite being hard to pronounce, difficult to search, and largely criticized by many people, /e/ as a brand name had the benefit to be very singular and helped us appear different. In the end it conveyed the idea that we’re doing something special. […] Nevertheless, as we are reaching more and more people and progressively catching interested from a mainstream audience, we have to introduce a new, strong brand, easier to use, easier to refer to and easier to share with people. The goal of this brand is to have a strong name to call our products, intended to be used by a large number of users in many different countries and cultures. It took some time, since we had many different candidates, both from internal suggestions and from our community. We wanted something that would both convey our project’s values, and that could be within the same lineage of our initial project name. We also had to secure this new brand making sure it was not already in use in the same field of activity, and by entering a long trademark registration processes. Read more

Audiocasts/Shows: Linux Action News, mintcast, Audacity, and Starlink

  • Linux Action News 212

    Major performance milestones are being hit with new code inbound for Linux, Plasma and GNOME desktops are set to run Wayland on NVIDIA's binary driver, and why the SFC's new GPL fight could have implications for you.

  • mintcast 372.5 – The Tablet Chronicles

    1:22 Linux Innards 36:00 Vibrations from the Ether 52:41 Announcements & Outro In our Innards section, tablets And finally, the feedback and a couple of suggestions

  • Video Editing with Linux: The Most Important Part of a Video

    Next in our video editing series for the Librem 14, Gardiner Bryant explains why audio is critical in video production, capturing good sound, and post-processing using Audacity, an open source sound editing solution. This video will help those looking to level up their audio and overall production.

  • Starlink's Linux Secrets | LINUX Unplugged 429

    We attempt a live production over Starlink, and dig into the secrets of this giant Linux network in space.