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June 2020

today's leftovers and howtos

Filed under
Misc
HowTos
  • Perl Weekly Challenge 66: Divide Integers and Power Integers
  • Links: June 28, 2020 | Hackaday

    We got a nice note from Michelle Thompson this week thanking us for mentioning the GNU Radio Conference in last week’s Links article, and in particular for mentioning the virtual CTF challenge that they’re planning. It turns out that Michelle is deeply involved in designing the virtual CTF challenge, after having worked on the IRL challenges at previous conferences. She shared a few details of how the conference team made the decision to go forward with the virtual challenge, inspired in part by the success of the Hack-A-Sat qualifying rounds, which were also held remotely. It sounds like the GNU Radio CTF challenge will be pretty amazing, with IQ files being distributed to participants in lieu of actually setting up receivers. We wish Michelle and the other challenge coordinators the best of luck with the virtual con, and we really hope a Hackaday reader wins.

  • Full Circle Magazine: Full Circle Magazine #158

    This month:
    * Command & Conquer
    * How-To : Python, Ubuntu On a 2-in-1 Tablet, and Rawtherapee
    * Graphics : Inkscape
    * Graphics : Krita for Old Photos
    * Linux Loopback
    * Everyday Ubuntu : Starting Again
    * Ubports Touch
    * Review : Kubuntu, and Xubuntu 20.04
    * Ubuntu Games : Into The Breach
    plus: News, My Opinion, The Daily Waddle, Q&A, and more.

  • 400 organizations sign open letter to save Open Technology Fund (OTF)

    Almost 400 organizations have signed an open letter asking Congress to protect the funding of open source projects following some recent US political turmoil.

    Notable signatories include organizations like the Wikimedia Foundation, the Electronic Frontier Foundation, the Tor Project, Red Hat, Gnome, Digital Ocean, TunnelBear, the Open Source Initiative, AccessNow, Human Rights Watch, and the Organized Crime and Corruption Reporting Project (OCCRP).

    More than 2,300 individuals from the open source and human rights communities have also signed the letter in their names.

  • How to install vim on OpenSUSE/SUSE Linux using zypper
  • How to install Master PDF Editor on Ubuntu 20.04
  • How to play Steam games on Chrome OS with Linux Support
  • Lm Sensors: It's Simple To Query Your Hardware Temps

scikit-survival 0.13 Released

Filed under
Software
GNOME
Sci/Tech

Today, I released version 0.13.0 of scikit-survival. Most notably, this release adds sksurv.metrics.brier_score and sksurv.metrics.integrated_brier_score, an updated PEP 517/518 compatible build system, and support for scikit-learn 0.23.

For a full list of changes in scikit-survival 0.13.0, please see the release notes.

Read more

Adriaan de Groot: KSysGuard

Filed under
KDE

Packaging a big stack like the software from the KDE community – Frameworks, Plasma, and all the applications and libraries and tools from the KDE Release Service – takes a fair bit of time and energy. The KDE-FreeBSD team works on both packaging and porting – making sure that KDE applications behave well on FreeBSD just like on other operating systems.

The majority of the work of compatibility happens in Qt, which is also maintained by the KDE-FreeBSD team. Then the KDE frameworks – 80 or so libraries that are small, lightweight, tiered-so-you-know-about-dependencies and LGPL-licensed – pile a bunch of compatibility on top of that for desktop purposes.

But sometimes, an application needs to dig into the system itself. A text editor edits text regardless of the underlying system, but a memory-usage monitor needs to know how to ask the OS about memory-usage.

So this week I spent a fair bit of time in the KSysGuard codebase, because there’s a FreeBSD bug report that says that the memory-usage monitor shows nothing, and another report that says the graph and the status bar don’t match.

Read more

Mozilla: Thunderbird Conversations and TenFourFox Feature Parity Release 24

Filed under
Moz/FF

  • Thunderbird Conversations 3.1 Released

    Thunderbird Conversations is an add-on for Thunderbird that provides a conversation view for messages. It groups message threads together, including those stored in different folders, and allows easier reading and control for a more efficient workflow.

    [...]

    The one feature that is currently missing after the rewrite is inline quick reply. This has been of lower priority, as we have focussed on being able to keep the main part of the add-on running with the newer versions of Thunderbird. However, now that 3.1 is stable, I hope to be able to start work on a new version of quick reply soon.

  • TenFourFox FPR24 available

    TenFourFox Feature Parity Release 24 final is now available for testing (downloads, hashes, release notes). There are no additional changes other than outstanding security updates. Assuming all goes well, it will go live on Monday afternoon/evening Pacific time.

Linux 5.8-rc3

Filed under
Development
Linux

Well, we had a big merge window, and we have a fairly big rc3 here
too. The calm period for rc2 is clearly over.

That said, I don't think there's anything _particularly_ scary in
here, and the size of this rc is probably simply a direct result of
the fact that 5.8 is a big release. It's too early to say if this will
mean that we'll have a longer rc period as a result, I'll just have to
keep an eye out for how this all progresses.

The stats all look fairly normal: about half is drivers (networking is
a big chunk, but there's really a bit of everything in there: gpu,
sound, usb, you name it).

Outside of drivers, we have the usual suspects: arch updates (x86 and
arm stand out), core networking, but also core kernel and VM updates.
And a fair amount of tooling updates (mostly selftests, but also
objtool and virtio).

Go forth and test,

              Linus

Read more

Also: Linux 5.8-rc3 Released - Fairly Big But Not Particularly Scary

Linux in Devices/Embedded: Bootlin, Texas Instruments and Garmin

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • Bootlin at the Embedded Linux Conference 2020

    Bootlin has been a participant at the Embedded Linux Conference for many years, and despite the special conditions this year, we will again be participating to this online event, from June 29 to July 1.

  • J721E DRA829/TDA4VM/AM752x – Texas Instruments Cortex-A72 based Monster SoC’s

    Texas Instruments unveiled their first 64-bit processor in 2018 with TI AM654 “Keystone III” quad-core Arm Cortex-A53 + dual lockstep Cortex-R5F processor designed for general embedded and industrial applications.

    The company is now working on a more powerful processor with J721E SoC with Cortex-A72 cores belonging to the K3 Multicore SoC architecture platform appearing in TI Linux git repository. Ti J721E is a monster of an SoC, not necessarily in terms of CPU processing power, but it has an amazing amount of features and peripherals.

  • OpenStreetMap for Garmin Fenix

    I’ve recently bought a Garmin Fenix Multisport Smartwatch. The watch offers support for navigation and maps. By default it came with some topo maps for Europe. However I wanted to use more detailed maps from OpenStreetMap.

    [...]

    Also there had been problems with the map on fenix. The draw order really matters and I needed to draw forests earlier as they didn’t show up on smartwatch, but worked fine when loaded in QMapShack. My current problem is that building aren’t rendered on the device. The question is if we really want them or leave them out.

    [...]

    Just download the file and copy it to the GARMIN folder on the device using MTP. In case you want a map for your region you can build it yourself using the MDE.

Oracle's New Papers About Servers With GNU/Linux

Filed under
Server
  • The crucial role of Linux in DevSecOps

    DevOps is morphing into DevSecOps, with development teams taking on the responsibility of delivering more secure code, and success dependent on aligned improvements in monitoring, automation, patching, and deployment. The operating systems you deploy, are a key foundational layer of your DevSecOps environment.

    In this white paper, Marc Staimer of Dragon Slayer Consulting reviews known Linux issues and impacts to DevSecOps environments in the following areas:

    • Security issues
    • Performance impacts
    • Deployment bottlenecks

  • Economic Value of Linux - Customer Case Studies

    In this white paper, the analyst company, Evaluator Group reviews Oracle Linux, taking a close look at what differentiates it based on input from users that have moved their environments from Red Hat Enterprise Linux to Oracle Linux.

    In-depth interviews were conducted with customers from healthcare, financial services, consumer and enterprise software, and insurance companies. The findings show the economic impact of Linux- specifically Oracle Linux in their environment, including:

    • Increased application performance
    • More stable operating environment–resulting in fewer outages
    • Reduction in annual OS support costs by 20% to 50%
    • Increased automation leading to faster deployment of new IT resources
    • Reductions in IT management time

  • Pella Optimizes IT Infrastructure and Reduces License Costs With Oracle Linux and Virtualization

    In this article, we will discuss how Pella transformed their IT infrastructure with a newly virtualized environment.

    The Pella Corporation is a privately held window and door manufacturing company headquartered in Pella, Iowa. They have manufacturing and sales operations in a number of locations in the United States. Pella Corporation employs more than 8,000 people with 17 manufacturing sites and 200 showrooms throughout the United States and select regions of Canada.

    Pella’s continuous business growth has proved to be a big challenge for the IT department. As the company’s needs increased, its older infrastructure, which was based on Unix physical servers, struggled to keep pace. Pella needed a more flexible platform that would allow them to easily build out capacity and improve functionality.

    This provided a unique opportunity for the IT team. The team wanted a reliable infrastructure that could support both the current capacity, and easily expand to accommodate growth while keeping costs to a minimum. For these reasons, the IT team decided to move to a virtualized x86-server environment.

    As a long time Oracle customer, Pella was already using Oracle applications and Oracle Database. Therefore, Pella was inclined to evaluate Oracle’s Virtualization and Linux solutions to facilitate their IT transformation. Oracle Linux was an obvious choice for Pella primarily because it is optimized for existing Oracle workloads. They also decided to virtualize their environment with Oracle VM mainly for the license structure advantages. With Oracle VM, Pella is able to pin CPUs to specific VMs, which in turn translated to saving on licensing costs for Oracle applications.

Haiku activity report - May 2020

Filed under
OS
Development

Kyle Ambroff-Kao continues his work on improving our unit tests, fixing some remaining problems with handling of symlinks.

The ext2 driver now properly report the filesystem name as ext2, 3 or 4 depending on which disk is mounted. This does not change the behavior, but avoids some confusion as previously it always said ext2. We have a single driver for all 3 versions of the filesystem as they are in fact quite similar and share a very large part of the code.

The work on XFS and UFS2 from our GSoC students is also being merged, with initial work towards listing the content of the root directory in progress.

Read more

Also: BeOS-Inspired Haiku Working On Supporting Modern CPU Features Like AVX

Kernel and Graphics: Bcachefs, Macintosh II and Intel Media Driver

Filed under
Linux
  • Bcachefs Linux File-System Seeing Performance Improvements, Other Progress

    While Ubuntu continues in their path of OpenZFS integration, Fedora is revisiting the possibility of using Btrfs on the desktop, Red Hat is continuing to invest in Stratis, and Reiser5 is being developed, Bcachefs as the file-system born out of the Linux block cache code is continuing to evolve.

    It's been some months since there was last any news on Bcachefs while last week marked the first time this year that there's been a status update passed along on the Patreon blog. Bcachefs development continues to be led by Kent Overstreet who wrote the latest status update on this currently out-of-tree file-system.

  • In 2020 The Linux Kernel Is Still Seeing Driver Work For The Macintosh II

    The Linux kernel is seeing some modern work done to its driver for supporting the Apple Desktop Bus on Macintosh II era systems.

    Along with the likes of the Apple PowerBook 100 series seeing Linux driver improvements once in a while, this Sunday developer Finn Thain sent out a set of patches improving the kernel's via-macii driver that contains "fixes for all known bugs" to this driver.

  • Intel Media Driver 20.2.pre4 Brings DG1 Graphics Card Support

    Intel's open-source media team has released a new development snapshot of their media driver that provides GPU-accelerated video encode/decode capabilities on Linux.

    Intel Media Driver 2020Q2 Pre-release 20.2.pre4 is this new version out Sunday. The Intel Media Driver 20.2.pre4 doesn't have any formal change-log but in digging through the recent patches, the big highlight is certainly initial support for the DG1 developer graphics card as the first Xe Graphics dGPU offering, but there are also other changes as part of this 20.2.pre4 release...

Meet Fosshost, a Free Hosting Provider for Your FOSS Projects

Filed under
GNU
Linux

As its name suggests, Fosshost is a not-for-profit hosting provider for FOSS (Free and Open Source Software) projects. But what makes it stand out is that it’s free to use. Yes, you read it right, it’s absolutely free!

Put together by a group of awesome people, Fosshost is trying to help the free and open source software community, especially projects who can’t afford to pay for hosting, with semi-dedicated virtual private servers, shared mirrors, storage and even domain registration.

Among the FOSS project that are already benefiting from Fosshost’s hosting services, there’s The GNOME Project, Xubuntu, The Xfce Desktop, Manjaro, Xiph.Org Foundation (Icecast, Opus, Speex), ActivityPub (W3), and many others.

Read more

More in Tux Machines

Best Free and Open Source Alternatives to Apple Photos

In 2020, Apple began the Apple silicon transition, using self-designed, 64-bit ARM-based Apple M1 processors on new Mac computers. Maybe it’s the perfect time to move away from the proprietary world of Apple, and embrace the open source Linux scene. Apple Photos is a photo management and editing application. It lets you organize your collection into albums, or keep your photos organized automatically with smart albums. What are the best free and open source alternatives? Read more

Top 15 Window Managers for Linux

A window manager is a software responsible for the placement and appearance of windows of various applications. It allows you to use any number of displays and utilize the screen to its full potential. The advantage is that it increases your productivity and improves your multitasking experience. But what exactly can one do with a window manager? The article describes some of the best floating and tiling window managers available for Linux. Read more

Endless OS Review - Desktop Linux Done Right for the Masses

We review the popular Endless OS as Linux Desktop with the new features and updates of the latest version 4.0. Read more

today's howtos

  • How to Install PostgreSQL 14 in Ubuntu 20.04

    There are specific database software attributes that make PostgreSQL stand out against other database platforms. The first and obvious attribute is its open-source nature. This PostgreSQL trait puts it on continuous developmental milestones. Both its community and developers seek to evolve PostgreSQL into an enterprise-class performing software. Existing PostgreSQL community platforms help users deal with emerging bugs, and also understand its various functionalities and use cases. Other PostgreSQL strengths are in its unique functions like Store Procedure, Diverse Indexing Techniques, Flexible Full-text search, Diversified Extension Functions, and Diverse kind of Replication.

  • How to upload an ISO image to the Proxmox Server - Unixcop the Unix / Linux the admins deams

    Hello, friends. We have already shown you how to install Proxmox and we noticed that the process is easier than you might think. Now I will show you how to upload an ISO image to the Proxmox server. To do this, I will use the graphical method or through the terminal. With Proxmox we will be able to virtualize systems professionally and to do many things more like cluster, backups, and others. However, to start with the virtualization we have to have an ISO image of the system. So, with a server that is far away from our location, how to do it? How to have the ISO image on the server so that Proxmox can manage it? Well, that’s what I will show you today. Let’s go for it.

  • How to install FreeOffice 2021 on Ubuntu 20.04 Linux - Linux Shout

    One of the best free alternatives to Microsoft Office is FreeOffice, developed by a German software company- SoftMaker. Recently, they have upgraded their Office suite to version 21. And here we learn the steps to install FreeOffice 2021 version on Ubuntu 20.04 Linux using the command terminal. This free office suite is a part of the commercial one from the same developers known as SoftMaker Office 21 (also available for Linux), of course, the premium will have more features but that doesn’t mean the free version- FreeOffice 2021 deprives to full fill all daily office documents (MS-Word alternative) related requirements. It offers a Microsoft office ribbon-like interface and three modules- TextMaker 21 to create documents; PlanMaker 21 to create sheets (Excel alternative) and Presentations 21 for making slides like MS-Powerpoint.

  • How to verify checksum on Linux | FOSS Linux

    A checksum is small-sized data obtained from a block of digital data used to detect errors. The checksum value uses a transmission message to represent bit numbers. Extensively, it has been used and still is in use by IT experts to detect high-level errors that might happen during data transmission. Before transmission, every bit of data is assigned a checksum value after running a cryptographic hash function. Checksum sometimes is termed as a hash sum or hash value. It is a long data string that contains various numbers and letters. They work by providing the receiving end information about the data transmission to deliver the full range of data. Checksum acts as a fingerprint for files since it contains a long string of numbers and letters. It aids in obtaining the number of bits included in a transmission. Suppose the checksum value calculated by the end-user is slightly different from the original checksum value of the file. In that case, it alerts all parties involved in the transmission that a third party corrupted the file. The receiver can then investigate what went wrong or try re-downloading the file. Standard protocols used to determine checksum numbers are the transmission control protocol (TCP) and the user diagram protocol (UDP). TCP is more reliable for tracking transmitted packets of data, but UDP may be beneficial to avoid slowing down transmission time.

  • How to create and extract cpio archives on Linux Examples

    Although the cpio archiving utility is nowadays used less than other archiving tools like tar, it is still good to know how it works, since it is still used, for example, to create initramfs images on Linux and for rpm packages, which are used mainly in the Red Hat family of distributions. In this tutorial we see how to create and extract cpio archives using the GNU cpio utility, and how to obtain a list of the files they contain.

  • How to hash passwords on Linux

    Passwords should never be stored as plain text. Whether we are talking about a web application or an operating system, they should always be in hash form (on Linux, for example, hashed passwords are stored in the /etc/shadow file). Hashing is the process through which, by the use of some complex algorithms, a password is turned into a different string. Such process is one-way: there is no way to revert an hashed password to its original, plain text form. Hashing often involves the use of random data as additional input for the hash algorithm, so that the same password, hashed two times, doesn’t produce the same result. This random data is called salt. In this tutorial we explore some methods we can use to hash passwords on Linux.

  • A Decade with Jekyll

    Today I’d like to look back on my experience with Jekyll, the static site generator (SSG) that I’m using to publish this site and my other blogs Meta Redux and Emacs Redux. Back in the day Jekyll was a trend-setter - it basically defined the SSG category and every subsequent tool in it was compared to Jekyll. A lot has happened since 2011: [...]

  • ZFS Storage pool layout: VDEVs

    The storage pool of ZFS constitutes one or more virtual devices that are, in general, called vdevs. A Vdev is either a single disk, or two or more disks which mirrors each other, or a group of disks that organizes together. The RAID layout sets on each vdev as opposed to the storage pool. Similarly, data that is present in the storage pool strips across all vdevs which also means that the loss of one vdev would result in pool failure.

  • [Old] The Basic Guide to Working with ZFS

    RAID-Z1 replaces RAID5 in a traditional setup. Performance is pretty equivalent, but the benefit is in some of the features. As mentioned before, you get healing or at least detection of bit rot or a bad sector, it’s a lot easier to set up with mixed drives, etc. RAID-Z2 (equivalent to RAID6) performs better from my experience than any traditional RAID6 setup I’ve used with equivalent drives on an equivalent machine.