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May 2021

Xfce’s Apps Update for May 2021 Brings Improvements to Thunar, Mousepad, and More

Filed under
Software

May has been a great month for Xfce, which is still one of the lightest, customizable, and modern desktop environments for Linux-based operating systems. The star of this month is the famous Thunar file manager, which received no less than three stable and two development releases.

The stable releases bump the version number to 4.16.8 for the Xfce 4.16 series, bringing various bug fixes for crashes, regressions, or security issues, in an attempt to make Thunar more stable, secure and reliable. On the other hand, the two development releases introduced numerous new features and improvements that you’ll be enjoying as part of the upcoming Xfce 4.18 release.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

  • May 2021 Web Server Survey [Ed: The Microsoft collapse in Web servers continues; down from 5.54% to 4.95% in one single mouth (lost 7 million!)]

    In the May 2021 survey we received responses from 1,218,423,991 sites across 259,596,021 unique domains and 11,051,830 web-facing computers. This reflects a gain of 6.28 million sites and 112,000 computers, but a loss of 4.87 million domains.

    nginx gained the largest number of hostnames, active sites, and computers this month; but also suffered the largest loss of 4.73 million domains. Its most notable gain was of 78,900 computers (+2.03%), which increased its leading share to 36.0%. It also continues to lead in the hostnames and domains metrics, while Apache is top in active sites.

    Apache also maintains its lead amongst the top million websites, with a 25.4% share compared to nginx's 22.9%. Cloudflare's share of the top million sites is now up to 17.0% after increasing its presence by a further 3,090 sites, and Microsoft added 1,840 sites to bring its share up to 6.85%.

    OpenResty saw the largest decrease of 8.10 million hostnames (-9.88%), which has taken its market share down to 6.06% (-0.7 pp). Microsoft also suffered a large loss of 6.92 million sites (-10.3%), which took its share down to 4.95% (-0.6 pp).

    One of OpenResty's most prominent users is Automattic, which uses it to serve millions of Tumblr microblogging websites that can be found under the tumblr.com domain – for example, icontherecord.tumblr.com.

    Automattic is also responsible for the popular WordPress.com blogging service, where it instead uses nginx to serve millions of blogs. These WordPress-powered sites can either use custom domain names, or free blogs can be created directly under the wordpress.com domain – for example, catsbeingcats.wordpress.com.

    The underlying WordPress blogging software reached its 18th birthday this month. Automattic continues to contribute to this open source project, and the software is freely available from wordpress.org, allowing anyone to download and install the software on other compatible web server platforms. Although Apache and nginx are recommended, any server that supports PHP and MySQL ought to be capable of running a WordPress site. Such is the popularity of WordPress, some hosting providers also provide one-click installers and other tools that make it easy to manage WordPress sites.

  • Virtual Desktops - The Future of Computing | Shells.com AMA [[Ed: This headline is a gross exaggeration]

    Collaborating and partnering with over 10 Linux distributors to make a seamless virtual desktop experience, Alex is CEO of shells.com, a new virtual desktop cloud computing solution that is simplifying the virtual desktop experience.

    The platform lets anyone access their cloud computer from any device with a browser so you can have a Linux desktop on your Apple iPad or your Windows computer on your XBox!
    The team are also the previous founders and operators of Private Internet Access, one of the world’s best and most trusted VPNs. This Slogging thread by Alex Lee, Justin Roberti, Golda Velez, Zlatan Todoric and Akasha Rose occurred in slogging's official #amas channel, and has been edited for readability.

  • pie-executable and sharedlib fixed again

    However, I see in latest build of EasyOS that binary executables are still showing as mime type "application/x-sharedlib" in package 'shared-mime-info', though 'file' executable shows them as "ELF 64-bit LSB pie executable".

    Chased the cause down to the build using an older /usr/share/mime/packages/freedesktop.org.xml, instead of the one that comes with the 'shared-mime-info' package.

    Also fixed a couple of other things...

    A change rather than a fix... the keyboard layout and password entry in the initrd are now gtk GUI apps. That is, nice GUI apps before the switch_root to the main filesystem.
    Previously, was only doing that for non-English builds, then not at all as Xorg was not working with the /dev/fb0 framebuffer -- solved by rolling back to  xserver 1.19.7, from 1.20.8.

    Note, in the EasyOS Buster-series had this problem, and compiled a very cutdown xserver 1.19.6 and made it into a PET. Used that to run GUI apps in the initrd.

IBM/Red Hat/Fedora Leftovers

Filed under
Red Hat

     

  • X.Org Server Git Lands Latest Patches To Help NVIDIA XWayland

    Red Hat's Olivier Fourdan has landed the latest XWayland improvements into X.Org Server Git for primarily benefiting the NVIDIA proprietary driver stack. 

    The code pushed to X.Org Server Git today is adding the GLVND (OpenGL Vendor Neutral Dispatch Library) vendor to the XWayland screen. This change is ultimately about ensuring the proper GLX library gets loaded when using the XWayland EGLStreams back-end. 

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  • Get started with Kubernetes using chaos engineering

    Kubernetes is turning 11, so I'll be celebrating its birthday by giving you some open source tools that will help you cause chaos. Chaos engineering is part science, part planning, and part experiments. It's the discipline of experimenting on a system to build confidence in the system's capability to withstand turbulent conditions in production.

    Before I start passing out the gifts, in this introductory article, I will explain the basics of how chaos engineering works.

  • Join upstream maintainers in this new free online event [Ed: IBM and OSI boosting Microsoft moles and lobbyists (of proprietary software!) and this is so awful on so many levels. Speaks of "our pals at" Microsoft... and notice how many Microsoft employees lead this. They've killed the term "Open Source".]

    Upstream will kick off Maintainer Week, a series of events we're hosting alongside our pals at GitHub to celebrate the vital work of open source maintainers and highlight some of the heroes behind the movement.

     

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  • Fedora Community Blog: Outreachy Interns introduction – 2021 Summer

    Recently, Outreachy announced selected Interns for May 2021 to August 2021 round and we have 4 interns with us. This blog introduces them to the community. If you see them around, please welcome them and share some virtual cookies.

    Outreachy is a paid, remote internship program that helps traditionally underrepresented people in tech make their first contributions to Free and Open Source Software (FOSS) communities. Fedora is participating in this round of Outreachy as a mentoring organization. We asked our Outreachy interns to tell us some things about themselves! 

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  • Learn Quarkus faster with quick starts in the Developer Sandbox for Red Hat OpenShift

    Java developers are usually required to take many actions before we can begin developing and deploying cloud-native microservices on Kubernetes. First, we have to configure everything from the integrated development environment (IDE) to build tools such as Maven or Gradle. We also need to configure the command-line tools used for containerization and generating the Kubernetes manifest. If we don’t want to spin up a Kubernetes cluster locally, we also must connect to a remote Kubernetes cluster for continuous testing and deployment.

    Developers should spend less time on configuration and more time accelerating the inner-loop development cycle of building, testing, and deploying our applications. Ideally, we should be able to continuously develop applications in a pre-configured Kubernetes environment.

    This article is a guide to configuring Java applications using Quarkus quick starts in the Developer Sandbox for Red Hat OpenShift. As you'll see, using quick starts in the developer sandbox lets you focus on the inner loop of development, without needing to configure the Kubernetes cluster or development tools.

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  • 4 books to boost your data storytelling skills [Ed: "Consider these books as essential resources to help you maximize the value of your data" sounds like some sort of surveillance PR slant in Red Hat's site]

    Whether you are an analyst, a business operations pro, an upwardly mobile team lead, or a senior executive, working with data is now a critical success factor to advancing your career. While hardcore data skills like being good at math and computer science are key, softer skills are equally important and sometimes harder to master.

    Soft data skills involve being able to communicate your vision and persuade stakeholders with a compelling story. Unfortunately, most data science courses don’t teach these skills, which makes obtaining these types of skills a challenge.

Free Software Leftovers

Filed under
OSS

     

  • Genode OS 21.05 Released With Webcam Support, Encrypted File Vault

    Genode OS as the from-scratch open-source operating system framework built atop a micro-kernel abstraction layer and various original user-space components is out with its version 21.05 update. 

    Given the amount of work being carried out by Genode OS and not just relying on the Linux kernel or a platform with existing device driver support, Genode for some areas is late to the party... Such as with today's Genode OS 21.05 release now introducing web camera support. Genode OS 21.05 features initial web cam support that they began working on last year given the pandemic. This ended up being quite involved even with leveraging libuvc and libusb. They do have webcam support working now though including having developed integration for VirtualBox and QEMU. 

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  • Daniel Stenberg: curl localhost as a local host

    When you use the name localhost in a URL, what does it mean? Where does the network traffic go when you ask curl to download http://localhost ?

    Is “localhost” just a name like any other or do you think it infers speaking to your local host on a loopback address?

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  • Huawei P50 teased with latest invite for the HarmonyOS event on June 2

    Huawei has been using the invites for its HarmonyOS event to tease upcoming products – first the Huawei Watch 3, then a new M-Pencil for the upcoming MatePad Pro 2 tablet and now the Huawei P50 series. The latest invite shows two circular camera bumps seen at an angle.

    We have seen these bumps several times before in leaked renders and hands-on photos. They are supposed to house an impressive Sony IMX800 1” sensor, however, the trade sanctions and the delays they brought have caused Huawei to lose some of its thunder.

  • Emirates News Agency - TII's Secure Systems Research Centre joins Linux Foundation’s Dronecode - ToysMatrix

    Technology Innovation Institute (TII), the applied research pillar of Abu Dhabi’s Advanced Technology Research Council (ATRC), today announced that it has joined Dronecode, a US-based non-profit run by Linux Foundation, to foster the use of open-source software on flying vehicles.

    TII obtained membership in the global organisation through its Secure Systems Research Centre (SSRC).

Programming Leftovers

Filed under
Development
  • ConvertiGo: RAD web and mobile development with low- and no-code support

    ConvertiGo is a No-Code, Low-code platform for full-stack mobile and web application development. It helps developers to keep a huge amounts of time and money instead of waste them by writing and maintaining complex code.

    ConvertiGo currently used by more than 150K developers worldwide, building enterprise class mobile apps.

  • Nishit Patel: Beginning my GSoC Journey

    I am starting a new blog series, for covering my GSoC’21 journey with GNOME Foundation. This is going to be an introductory blog where I will talk about the project on which I’ll be working this summer. Before we get started let me introduce myself to the folks reading from the GNOME planet. I am Nishit Patel, an undergraduate Computer Engineering student from India.

    I began my pre GSoC journey back in November 2020 when I opened my first MR in tracker project. It was a small bug fix in the README.md file which I came across while setting up my local environment. Later, I began keeping a watch on the #tracker IRC and used to ask maintainers for help whenever I was stuck at something. Maintainers were very helpful and polite with their prompt replies even if I was asking some stupid question that was already addressed somewhere in the documentation. One thing that I noticed is it is better to first google, and check the docs before asking the question as it saves the maintainers precious time, and you also get to learn something new in the process.

  • inline 0.3.19: Another Update

    A new release of the inline package got to CRAN today, following and further updating the recent update from earlier in the month. inline facilitates writing code in-line in simple string expressions or short files. The package was used quite extensively by Rcpp in the days before Rcpp Attributes arrived on the scene providing an even better alternative for its use cases. inline is still used by rstan and a number of other packages.

    This release builds on and extends the work of the recent 0.3.18 release and tweaks some of the test. We cannot fully test all platforms used by CRAN so some times iterations such as this one are needed. The package was uploaded a few days ago, but it sometimes takes a few days to clarify changes over email to the CRAN maintainers whose work is still greatly appreciated.

  • Qt Online Installer 4.1.1 released

    We are happy to announce that Qt Online Installer 4.1.1 has been released today.

Release Manager Provides Update on Early Features Requisitions for Leap 15.4

Filed under
SUSE

The release manager of openSUSE Leap is finishing up the release of Leap 15.3, but wants to keep contributors and developers informed about an early feature request deadline for the Leap 15.4 release.

Early feature requests are important since Leap is compatible with SUSE Linux Enterprise and the early feature request deadline for Service Pack 4 is June 26.

“This is very important to openSUSE Leap 15.4 contributors as 1/3 of Leap 15.4 binaries will be re-used with SUSE Linux Enterprise and therefore submit requests are accepted there,” wrote release manager Lubos Kocman on a project email list. “Just to clarify, this deadline is the same for everyone, be it a largest partner, community contributor or an employee.”

openSUSE Leap and Package Hub exclusive packages will have similar deadlines as described in the roadmap.

Read more

Also: openSUSE.Asia Summit 2021 Logo Competition Announcement

Kernel: NVIDIA Tegra and Intel Alder Lake M

Filed under
Linux
  • Linux Adding New Thermal Code To Deal With Hot Tegra Devices - Phoronix

    Simple CPU throttling isn't sufficient for cooling some NVIDIA Tegra devices running the upstream Linux kernel so thermal cooling integration into the device frequency "devfreq" scaling code is in the work for such high performance NVIDIA SoCs.

    Various developers working on the NVIDIA Tegra / Arm Linux support found that some Tegra SoCs / devices are producing much more heat than others. The old ASUS Transformer TF700T with Tegra 3 SoC for example when running the mainline Linux kernel is found to be running very hot and the initial target of these new patches.

  • Linux 5.14 To Have Additional Bring-Up For Intel Alder Lake M - Phoronix

    In recent months there has been a lot of Linux kernel patches for bringing up Alder Lake S and Alder Lake P while more recently the enablement patches for Alder Lake M low-power mobile has begun.

    The Linux support bring-up for Alder Lake M has been trailing the ADL-S and ADL-P but not by much and in most cases the ADL-M amounts to adding additional PCI IDs.

    So far in the mainline Linux kernel for Linux 5.13 there is Alder Lake M support with the intel_th PCI and USB DWC3 drivers but with the Linux 5.14 cycle this summer is when it looks like more of that initial enablement will happen.

Nyxt Browser is a Keyboard-oriented Web Browser Inspired by Emacs and Vim

Filed under
Web

You get plenty of open-source web browsers available for Linux. Not just limited to chrome-based options, but chrome alternatives as well.

[...]

Nyxt is a keyboard-oriented open-source web browser available for Linux and macOS.

Of course, not every power user utilizes keyboard shortcuts, but this aims to cater the needs of users who prefer to navigate via the keyboard.

It is inspired by how the keyboard shortcuts in Vim and Emacs work — so if you are comfortable with those editors, the shortcuts will feel familiar to you.

Unlike mainstream web browsers, you do not have to navigate your way inside multiple settings and menu, you will get all the functionality that you need to access with a quick shortcut or a command.

In case you were wondering, it is web engine agnostic, but it currently supports WebEngine and WebKit.

So, it saves time and improves your browsing experience if you are a fan of navigating around using the keyboard.

It offers a fair share of useful features which I shall highlight below.

Read more

New Shows/Videos about GNU/Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux

More in Tux Machines

Free Software Stigma and Upcoming Events

  • Why Do Companies Still Have a Fear of Open Source?

    Open Source Software, since its birth, has made people wonder about its effects. The debate is never-ending, and for the right reasons. Giants like Apple have often viewed Open Source skeptically because they are mostly unfounded. However, one cannot deny that these sources are functional and flexible. They are also partly responsible for bringing the technological world in the right direction. But are they worth it? In this article, we shall learn all about open source companies and why use open source software, and why open source software is still not greeted warmly by certain companies. Therefore, without further ado, let's start right away.

  • Samuel Iglesias: X.Org Developers Conference 2021

    Last week we had our most loved annual conference: X.Org Developers Conference 2021. As a reminder, due to COVID-19 situation in Europe (and its respective restrictions on travel and events), we kept it virtual again this year… which is a pity as the former venue was Gdańsk, a very beautiful city (see picture below if you don’t believe me!) in Poland. Let’s see if we can finally have an XDC there! [...] Big shout-out to the XDC 2021 organizers (Intel) represented by Radosław Szwichtenberg, Ryszard Knop and Maciej Ramotowski. They did an awesome job on having a very smooth conference. I can tell you that they promptly fixed any issue that happened, all of that behind the scenes so that the attendees not even noticed anything most of the times! That is what good conference organizers do!

  • Open Source Summit + Embedded Linux Conference 2021

    This month has been nothing short of hectic, with back to back to back conferences filling up the calendar. Following Linaro Virual Connect, XDC, and Linux Plumbers (which ends today), Collaborans will be attending (virtually) next week's Open Source Summit + Embedded Linux Conference 2021. Connecting the open source ecosystem under one roof, the conference is "a unique environment for cross-collaboration between developers, sysadmins, devops, architects and others who are driving technology forward". Taking place from September 27-30, the event will be held in a hybrid format for the first time, with both in-person and virtual offerings, to ensure that everyone who wants to participate is able to do so.

Programming/Development Leftovers

  • New tool: an nginx playground

    On Wednesday I was talking to a friend about how it would be cool to have an nginx playground website where you can just paste in an nginx config and test it out. And then I realized it might actually be pretty easy to build, so got excited and started coding and I built it.

  • Pandas to check cell value is NaN

    The main documentation of the pandas is saying null values are missing values. We can denote the missing or null values as NaN in the pandas as most developers do. The NaN and None keywords are both used by developers to show the missing values in the dataframe. The best thing in the pandas is that it treats both NaN and None similarly. To check the missing value of a cell, pandas.notnull will return False in both cases of NaN and None if the cell has NaN or None. So, in this article, we will explore different methods to check whether a particular cell value is null or not (NaN or None).

  • gfldex: Convolution

    Flavio wrote a straightforward solution to PWC-131-1 and wondered if there is a idiomatic way. Assuming, that “idiomatic” means to use language features which lesser languages refuse to require, I’m happy to deliver convoluted code.

  • Perl Weekly Challenge 131: Consecutive Arrays

    These are some answers to task 1 of the Week 131 of the Perl Weekly Challenge organized by Mohammad S. Anwar. Spoiler Alert: This weekly challenge deadline is due in a few days from now (on September 26, 2021 at 24:00). This blog post offers some solutions to this challenge, please don’t read on if you intend to complete the challenge on your own.

  • My Favorite Modules: if | Tom Wyant [blogs.perl.org]

    My blog post My Favorite Warnings: redundant and missing touched on the use of the if module. Comments on that post made me think it deserved a top-level treatment, expanding on (though not necessarily improving on) Aristotle's comment.

CutefishOS: Unix-y development model? Check. macOS aesthetic? Check (if you like that sort of thing)

One of the reasons Linux has never caught on as a desktop operating system, as Linux fans know, is that Linux isn't a desktop operating system, it's a kernel. And assembling it into a coherent package users can install is the job of a distribution. This is a very different distribution model than the one Apple or Microsoft uses, and it confuses newcomers. Windows and macOS are easier to understand, they are single things made by single companies. Canonical and Red Hat notwithstanding, Linux is not packaged and presented this way at all. I've long believed that this difference is one of the key stumbling blocks to wider Linux adoption. Apple has macOS, Microsoft has Windows, Linux has... hundreds of awkward, confusingly named options. This is both Linux's greatest strength, and its greatest weakness. For those who already understand and use it the options are welcome. I've been a Linux user for over a decade and I've used several dozen distros, some of them so different from one another it's difficult to believe they're built from the same base. This wealth of options is great, but it's both confusing and overwhelming for new users. Distributions like elementary OS are popular with people switching from macOS and Windows because elementary OS offers that same highly polished, all-in-one package that makes the transition from proprietary operating systems smoother. But this is Linux, so you can't just have elementary OS. The latest distro to catch my eye is CutefishOS, which owes considerable design debt to both elementaryOS and the operating system made by that fruit company. Read more

BattlEye confirms Linux support for Steam Deck

  • BattlEye confirms Linux support for Steam Deck, will be opt-in like Easy Anti-Cheat

    Just recently we had Epic Games announce that Easy Anti-Cheat now offers proper native Linux support and in addition support for Wine and Steam Play Proton - now we have BattlEye also confirming the same readying up for the Steam Deck.

  • BattlEye To Support Valve's Steam Deck / Proton

    Yesterday it was Epic Games confirming Easy Anti-Cheat for Linux and Wine/Proton ahead of the Steam Deck launch and today it's BattlEye confirming Proton / Steam Deck support. BattlEye has already provided native Linux support albeit not widely used. Today they tweeted that they will also be supporting the upcoming Steam Deck or more specifically the use of BattlEye within Proton. BattlEye is making this opt-in for game developers who wish to support its usage under Wine / Proton.