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June 2021

NVIDIA 470 EOL Drivers For Kepler Still Obliterating Open-Source Alternative

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

With the recent NVIDIA 470 series Linux driver beta this R470 branch is the point at which NVIDIA is ending its GeForce 600/700 series "Kepler" support. The 470 driver series will be maintained as a long-lived driver that will continue to see security updates and Linux kernel / X.Org Server compatibility updates for another three years. If this end-of-life status has you thinking about trying out the open-source "Nouveau" Linux driver with Kepler, here are some current benchmarks.

The NVIDIA 470 driver series should keep working with new Linux distributions through 2024, but if the 470 series marking the end of the official driver road for Kepler has you thinking about Nouveau, the support is still far less than ideal.

Read more

How your support fuels the GNU GPL

Filed under
GNU

The Free Software Foundation (FSF) Licensing & Compliance Lab is the central hub for licensing education and advocacy. Our work ranges from evaluating software, operating systems, and physical devices using our criteria for user freedom, to protecting free software against proprietary developers, to teaching users, developers, and lawyers about free software licensing. We have a large job to fulfill in order to make sure freedom is maintained and protected for future generations. With all that work going on, often behind the scenes, we wanted to take a moment to highlight some of our recent achievements.

Read more

Xfce’s Apps Update for June 2021 Brings New Releases of Ristretto, Xfce Settings, and More

Filed under
Software

June has been a slow month for the development of the lightweight Xfce desktop environment, probably because the summer is here and we’re all thinking about the holidays, but we got a new major release of the beloved Ristretto images viewer.

Ristretto 0.11 is here and it’s been in development for the past two years, adding new features like the ability to copy an image to the clipboard, support for old GTK2-style background color settings, new stock icons with reverse DNS format, as well as the ability to show the toolbar in full-screen when the mouse cursor is moved to the top.

Read more

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Imaging at the Edge

    Adoption of game-changing disruptive technologies in heavily regulated fields, such as healthcare, can prove slow, difficult and challenging. Learn how the use of Edge helps to overcome these challenges, transforming the world of medical imaging and providing innovative technology to healthcare professionals.

    The concept of medical imaging began in 1895 with the invention of the x-ray by a German professor of physics, Wilhelm Conrad Roentgen. Since then, the range of technologies for medical imaging has expanded and today includes ultrasound, CT (computed tomography), PET (positron emission tomography), MRI (magnetic resonance imaging), CR (computed radiography), DR (digital radiography), and mammography.

  • Interview to Hossein Nourikhah

    Which is your perception of the project, as seen from the outside world?

    I see LibreOffice project as an alternative path. The road to office productivity suites doesn’t have to end up in proprietary office applications and file formats. LibreOffice project is a way out, trying to provide freedom to the users, alongside providing user friendly, cost efficient products that are also accessible for the disabled people.
    On the other hand, LibreOffice is a complex piece of software, consisting of ~10 millions of lines of code [1], which is somehow difficult for an average programmer to get involved in its development. This is something that can be improved through various means, including better tools and documentation, and of course, more helping hands.

    [...]

    Yes, of course! I use the latest Ubuntu LTS, and I am a LibreOffice user on a daily basis. In fact, I was an enthusiastic user of an early version of OpenOffice.org from Red Hat 9.0 in 2003 [2], and I have switched to LibreOffice when it was released.
    I am a happy user, although there are glitches in text rendering for my own language (Persian/Farsi). I hope we can fix them sooner with the help of kind LibreOffice developers.

  • How I chose Librsvg and First Steps for Contributing

    For this blog post, I’ll be introducing the GNOME and Librsvg from a newcomer’s perspective, aimed towards other newcomers or prospective newcomers, and going over how I chose to work on Librsvg.

  • 85% of Enterprises Have Yet to Cross the Chasm to Full Kubernetes and Cloud Native Adoption, According to Industry Global Survey from Canonical

    Despite high adoption rates of cloud native technologies in recent years, enterprises have yet to cross the chasm to full adoption, but they’re quickly moving in that direction, according to initial results of a first-of-its kind survey released today by Canonical, the publishers of Ubuntu.

    The Kubernetes and Cloud Native Operations Report, which is still open for participation, has surveyed 1,200 global IT professionals so far on more than 40 topics about their usage of Kubernetes, bare metal, VMs, containers, and serverless applications.

Devices Leftovers

Filed under
Hardware
  • ASRock Industrial announces Intel Elkhart Lake mini PCs and motherboards - CNX Software

    Intel Atom x6000E Series, Celeron, and Pentium Elkhart Lake processors for IoT Edge applications were launched in September 2020, with many companies shortly introducing modules, single board computers, motherboards, and industrial, rugged mini PCs after the official announcement.

    ASRock Industrial took more time to announce their Elkhart Lake offerings, with three families of hardware platforms with NUC 6000 BOX Series and IBOX 6000 Series mini PCs, as well as NUC 6000 Motherboard series.

  • Venice GW7100 compact industrial SBC packs one Gigabit Ethernet port, one mPCIe socket - CNX Software

    Gateworks introduced the new Venice Industrial IoT SBC Family based on NXP i.MX 8M Mini processor with up to two Ethernet ports and four mPCIe Sockets last September starting with GW7300 board with dual Gigabit Ethernet and three mPCIe sockets.

    But the US company has now announced the availability of the smallest member of the family with Venice GW7100 SBC equipped with just one Gigabit Ethernet port and one mPCIe socket in a compact 100x35mm form factor.

  • Tiny i.MX8M Mini SBC serves up mini-PCIe with PoE-enabled GbE

    Gateworks’ 100 x 35mm “Venice GW7100” SBC combines a Linux-driven i.MX8M Mini with up to 4GB LPDDR4 and 64GB MMC plus GbE with PoE, USB Type-C, mini-PCIe with nano-SIM, -40 to 85°C support, and optional GPS.

    Gateworks has announced the smallest member of its family of i.MX8M based Venice SBCs, following the 105 x 100mm Venice GW7300 and 100 x 70mm GW7200. Unlike the earlier two models, the 100 x 35mm Venice GW7100 is limited to single GbE and mini-PCIe slots. Standard SKUs include 1GB RAM/8GB eMMC and 4GB/64GB.

  • This low-cost device uses tinyML on Arduino to detect respiratory diseases in pigs | Arduino Blog

    One major drawback to the largescale farming of animals for meat consumption is the tendency for diseases to spread rapidly and decimate the population. This widespread issue is what drove Clinton Oduor to build a tinyML-powered device that can perform precision livestock farming tasks intelligently. His project works by continuously monitoring the noise coming from pigs and makes a determination about what they mean, such as if a cough is indicative of a respiratory illness or a squeal denoting stress.

Programming Leftovers

Filed under
Development
  • Upgrading NextCloudPi

    So I finally got around to upgrading my NextCloudPi to version 20 with the hub and all. I really like it so far.

  • The perfect cross-platform serif and sans-serif font stacks

    Different web browsers use the same default fonts on the same operating system. However, the default fonts differ between operating systems and few fonts are available everywhere. In this article, I’ll focus on making the default fonts look and behave the same across operating systems.

    The default fonts for the generic “serif” and “sans-serif” (without serifs) fonts are metrically compatible across macOS, iOS, Windows, and Chrome OS. There are good options available for Linux too, but those are rarely set as the default fonts. Android only has one font, so you get what you get.

    Metrically compatible means that each individual character in one font has the same width as the same characters in another font. Metrical compatibility means you can substitute one font for another in a document without affecting its layout. E.g. a headline and paragraph should fill the same number of lines of text. This isn’t the same as a fixed-width font (monospace), where all the characters in the font have the same width.

  • Godot Web progress report #9: Godot Scripts JavaScript Interface

    It hasn't been long since the last Web progress report, but it's finally time for the blog entry you have probably been waiting for... time to talk about integrating Godot with third-party JavaScript APIs on the Web.

  • Considering the Next Critical Tech Talent Shortage

    But, COBOL expertise is just one example of a potential talent shortage. “Where should we expect to find future crises?” Loukides asks. “What other shortages might occur?” The key to understanding or predicting such shortages, he says, involves looking at critical infrastructure.

  • Code as Infrastructure

    The Next Critical Talent Shortage Won’t Be Fortran

    A few months ago, I was asked if there were any older technologies other than COBOL where we were in serious danger of running out of talent. They wanted me to talk about Fortran, but I didn’t take the bait. I don’t think there will be a critical shortage of Fortran programmers now or at any time in the future. But there’s a bigger question lurking behind Fortran and COBOL: what are the ingredients of a technology shortage? Why is running out of COBOL programmers a problem?

    The answer, I think, is fairly simple. We always hear about the millions (if not billions) of lines of COBOL code running financial and government institutions, in many cases code that was written in the 1960s or 70s and hasn’t been touched since. That means that COBOL code is infrastructure we rely on, like roads and bridges. If a bridge collapses, or an interstate highway falls into disrepair, that’s a big problem. The same is true of the software running banks.

  • Calculate the mean or average of a single column of numbers in a text file
  • Rakudo compiler, Release #147 (2021.06)

    On behalf of the Rakudo development team, I’m very happy to announce the June 2021 release of Rakudo #147. Rakudo is an implementation of the Raku1 language.

    The source tarball for this release is available from https://rakudo.org/files/rakudo. Pre-compiled archives will be available shortly.

Graphics: NVIDIA, AMD, and XWayland

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • NVIDIA 470 EOL Drivers For Kepler Still Obliterating Open-Source Alternative - Phoronix

    With the recent NVIDIA 470 series Linux driver beta this R470 branch is the point at which NVIDIA is ending its GeForce 600/700 series "Kepler" support. The 470 driver series will be maintained as a long-lived driver that will continue to see security updates and Linux kernel / X.Org Server compatibility updates for another three years. If this end-of-life status has you thinking about trying out the open-source "Nouveau" Linux driver with Kepler, here are some current benchmarks.

  • Linux Prepares For AMD Servers With Aldebaran GPU Nodes Sporting HBM2 - Phoronix

    The latest public code patches on the mailing list today are preparing for newer AMD heterogeneous servers that will have Aldebaran GPU nodes connected via xGMI links to the CPU(s) and the GPU dies in turn having HBM2 memory.

    These new heterogeneous AMD system details were revealed today as part of a set of patches prepping the AMD64 EDAC (Error Detection And Correction) kernel driver code for non-CPU nodes. The AMD64 EDAC driver is for traditionally dealing with and correcting system DRAM ECC errors while now being extended to GPU node memory accessible from the CPUs via the xGMI high-speed interconnect.

  • XWayland 21.1.2 Nears With NVIDIA Hardware Acceleration - Phoronix

    Michel Dänzer of Red Hat is preparing the release of XWayland 21.1.2 as the newest update to this standalone XWayland package separate from a whole X.Org Server release for running X11 clients within a Wayland environment.

    The standalone XWayland releases were started given the lack of momentum for new X.Org Server releases but XWayland code within there continuing to see a fair amount of code churn. These standalone releases were started by Red Hat with a focus on meeting Fedora's needs but Ubuntu and other distributions have also gotten onboard with this notion of separate releases.

Events: LibreOffice Conference, Qt World Summit 2021, and LF

Filed under
Misc
  • EXTENDED LibreOffice Conference Call for Papers

    LibreOffice Conference Call for Papers has been extended until July 18, 2021. This is the final deadline, and no further extension will be offered. To facilitate the development of the conference schedule, proposals can only be submitted using TDF event management platform at https://events.documentfoundation.org/libocon2021/cfp.

    LibreOffice Conference 2021 will take place online from September 23 to 25, Thursday to Saturday. The Document Foundation invites all members and contributors to submit talks, lectures and workshops. Whether you are a seasoned presenter or have never spoken in public before, if you have something interesting to share about LibreOffice, ODF, the Document Liberation Project or the ODF Toolkit, we want to hear from you!

  • Call for Presentations for Qt World Summit 2021

    Qt is looking for speakers, collaborators and industry thinkers to share their expertise and thoughts with the community in the upcoming Qt World Summit Online, November 3, 2021.

  • The Linux Foundation Announces Registration is Open for Open Source Summit and More Fall Events
  • The Linux Foundation Announces Registration is Open for Open Source Summit and More Fall Events

    The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, today announced that registration is open for many of its Fall 2021 events, for both in-person and virtual attendance. The Linux Foundation hosts the premier open source events around the world that empower technologists and other leaders to come together, share ideas, learn and collaborate to drive innovation.

Ubuntu Blog: Top 10 apps for a fresh Linux install in 2021

Filed under
Software
Ubuntu

Are you struggling with too much lag? Is it time for a spring clean and a fresh Linux install? Ready to upgrade to Focal Fossa (LTS) or Hirsute Hippo? Whatever situation you are in, get started quickly with some of the most popular apps you need for a fresh Linux install. Here are all the commands you need so easily copy and paste to get started! (There is a full block of commands at the end that you can easily copy and paste if you’d like to install all the apps in one go).

Read more

More in Tux Machines

Free Software Stigma and Upcoming Events

  • Why Do Companies Still Have a Fear of Open Source?

    Open Source Software, since its birth, has made people wonder about its effects. The debate is never-ending, and for the right reasons. Giants like Apple have often viewed Open Source skeptically because they are mostly unfounded. However, one cannot deny that these sources are functional and flexible. They are also partly responsible for bringing the technological world in the right direction. But are they worth it? In this article, we shall learn all about open source companies and why use open source software, and why open source software is still not greeted warmly by certain companies. Therefore, without further ado, let's start right away.

  • Samuel Iglesias: X.Org Developers Conference 2021

    Last week we had our most loved annual conference: X.Org Developers Conference 2021. As a reminder, due to COVID-19 situation in Europe (and its respective restrictions on travel and events), we kept it virtual again this year… which is a pity as the former venue was Gdańsk, a very beautiful city (see picture below if you don’t believe me!) in Poland. Let’s see if we can finally have an XDC there! [...] Big shout-out to the XDC 2021 organizers (Intel) represented by Radosław Szwichtenberg, Ryszard Knop and Maciej Ramotowski. They did an awesome job on having a very smooth conference. I can tell you that they promptly fixed any issue that happened, all of that behind the scenes so that the attendees not even noticed anything most of the times! That is what good conference organizers do!

  • Open Source Summit + Embedded Linux Conference 2021

    This month has been nothing short of hectic, with back to back to back conferences filling up the calendar. Following Linaro Virual Connect, XDC, and Linux Plumbers (which ends today), Collaborans will be attending (virtually) next week's Open Source Summit + Embedded Linux Conference 2021. Connecting the open source ecosystem under one roof, the conference is "a unique environment for cross-collaboration between developers, sysadmins, devops, architects and others who are driving technology forward". Taking place from September 27-30, the event will be held in a hybrid format for the first time, with both in-person and virtual offerings, to ensure that everyone who wants to participate is able to do so.

Programming/Development Leftovers

  • New tool: an nginx playground

    On Wednesday I was talking to a friend about how it would be cool to have an nginx playground website where you can just paste in an nginx config and test it out. And then I realized it might actually be pretty easy to build, so got excited and started coding and I built it.

  • Pandas to check cell value is NaN

    The main documentation of the pandas is saying null values are missing values. We can denote the missing or null values as NaN in the pandas as most developers do. The NaN and None keywords are both used by developers to show the missing values in the dataframe. The best thing in the pandas is that it treats both NaN and None similarly. To check the missing value of a cell, pandas.notnull will return False in both cases of NaN and None if the cell has NaN or None. So, in this article, we will explore different methods to check whether a particular cell value is null or not (NaN or None).

  • gfldex: Convolution

    Flavio wrote a straightforward solution to PWC-131-1 and wondered if there is a idiomatic way. Assuming, that “idiomatic” means to use language features which lesser languages refuse to require, I’m happy to deliver convoluted code.

  • Perl Weekly Challenge 131: Consecutive Arrays

    These are some answers to task 1 of the Week 131 of the Perl Weekly Challenge organized by Mohammad S. Anwar. Spoiler Alert: This weekly challenge deadline is due in a few days from now (on September 26, 2021 at 24:00). This blog post offers some solutions to this challenge, please don’t read on if you intend to complete the challenge on your own.

  • My Favorite Modules: if | Tom Wyant [blogs.perl.org]

    My blog post My Favorite Warnings: redundant and missing touched on the use of the if module. Comments on that post made me think it deserved a top-level treatment, expanding on (though not necessarily improving on) Aristotle's comment.

CutefishOS: Unix-y development model? Check. macOS aesthetic? Check (if you like that sort of thing)

One of the reasons Linux has never caught on as a desktop operating system, as Linux fans know, is that Linux isn't a desktop operating system, it's a kernel. And assembling it into a coherent package users can install is the job of a distribution. This is a very different distribution model than the one Apple or Microsoft uses, and it confuses newcomers. Windows and macOS are easier to understand, they are single things made by single companies. Canonical and Red Hat notwithstanding, Linux is not packaged and presented this way at all. I've long believed that this difference is one of the key stumbling blocks to wider Linux adoption. Apple has macOS, Microsoft has Windows, Linux has... hundreds of awkward, confusingly named options. This is both Linux's greatest strength, and its greatest weakness. For those who already understand and use it the options are welcome. I've been a Linux user for over a decade and I've used several dozen distros, some of them so different from one another it's difficult to believe they're built from the same base. This wealth of options is great, but it's both confusing and overwhelming for new users. Distributions like elementary OS are popular with people switching from macOS and Windows because elementary OS offers that same highly polished, all-in-one package that makes the transition from proprietary operating systems smoother. But this is Linux, so you can't just have elementary OS. The latest distro to catch my eye is CutefishOS, which owes considerable design debt to both elementaryOS and the operating system made by that fruit company. Read more

BattlEye confirms Linux support for Steam Deck

  • BattlEye confirms Linux support for Steam Deck, will be opt-in like Easy Anti-Cheat

    Just recently we had Epic Games announce that Easy Anti-Cheat now offers proper native Linux support and in addition support for Wine and Steam Play Proton - now we have BattlEye also confirming the same readying up for the Steam Deck.

  • BattlEye To Support Valve's Steam Deck / Proton

    Yesterday it was Epic Games confirming Easy Anti-Cheat for Linux and Wine/Proton ahead of the Steam Deck launch and today it's BattlEye confirming Proton / Steam Deck support. BattlEye has already provided native Linux support albeit not widely used. Today they tweeted that they will also be supporting the upcoming Steam Deck or more specifically the use of BattlEye within Proton. BattlEye is making this opt-in for game developers who wish to support its usage under Wine / Proton.