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April 2022

Videos/Audiocasts/Shows: OBS, OpenArena, mintCast, Linux App Summit 2022

Filed under
GNU
Linux

consfigurator 1.0.0

Filed under
Development
Software

I am pleased to announce Consfigurator 1.0.0.

Reaching version 1.0.0 signifies that we will try to avoid API breaks. You should be able to use Consfigurator to manage production systems.

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Unity 7.6 Released for Public Testing as the First Major Update to Unity7 in 6 Years

Filed under
Linux
News
Ubuntu

Featuring a new flat UI while retaining the system-wide blur, Unity 7.6 promises major improvements like redesigned Unity Dash (app launcher) and HUD, as well as refreshed styles for dock’s menus and tooltips for a modern and slick look, and improved low graphics mode to make the Unity Dash faster.

The upcoming release also improves the app info and ratings in the Unity Dash preview, improves the “Empty Trash” button in Unity Dock to use the Nemo file manager instead of Nautilus, and lowers the RAM usage.

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GNOME 43 Release Date Slated for September 21st, 2022

Filed under
Linux
News
GNOME

The release schedule for the upcoming GNOME 43 desktop environment series was published at the end of March 2022, shortly after the release of the GNOME 42 desktop environment, suggesting that the final release date is slated for September 21st, 2022.

GNOME 43 will be the third major update in the GNOME 4x series, and development slowly kicked off this month but an alpha version will be readied for public testing in early July, while the beta version is expected a month later in early August.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

  • Changes/StrongCryptoSettings3Forewarning1

    Cryptographic policies will be tightened in Fedora 38-39, SHA-1 signatures will no longer be trusted by default. Fedora 37 specifically doesn't come with any change of defaults, and this Fedora Change is an advance warning filed for extra visibility. Test your setup with FUTURE today and file bugs so you won't get bit by Fedora 38-39.

  • Kubernetes backup with advanced cluster recovery for SUSE Rancher clusters | SUSE Communities

    SUSE Rancher includes a rancher-backup operator to easily backup, restore or migrate Rancher. However, for broad, ecosystem wide backup and disaster recovery, SUSE’s software development partners step in with application, data and workload-centric solutions addressing the needs of an entire Kubernetes computing landscape. Catalogic Software, a SUSE One Gold Innovate partner, delivers CloudCasa, a Kubernetes Backup and DR as a Service offering, and we’ve invited Catalogic to author a guest blog so you can learn more about their solution. ~Bret

  • threads and libxcb, part 2

    I've been working on kopper recently, which is a complementary project to zink. Just as zink implements OpenGL in terms of Vulkan, kopper seeks to implement the GL window system bindings - like EGL and GLX - in terms of the Vulkan WSI extensions. There are several benefits to doing this, which I'll get into in a future post, but today's story is really about libX11 and libxcb.

    Yes, again.

    One important GLX feature is the ability to set the swap interval, which is how you get tear-free rendering by syncing buffer swaps to the vertical retrace. A swap interval of 1 is the typical case, where an image update happens once per frame. The Vulkan way to do this is to set the swapchain present mode to FIFO, since FIFO updates are implicitly synced to vblank. Mesa's WSI code for X11 uses a swapchain management thread for FIFO present modes. This thread is started from inside the vulkan driver, and it only uses libxcb to talk to the X server. But libGL is a libX11 client library, so in this scenario there is always an "xlib thread" as well.

    libX11 uses libxcb internally these days, because otherwise there would be no way to intermix xlib and xcb calls in the same process. But it does not use libxcb's reflection of the protocol, XGetGeometry does not call xcb_get_geometry for example. Instead, libxcb has an API to allow other code to take over the write side of the display socket, with a callback mechanism to get it back when another xcb client issues a request. The callback function libX11 uses here is straightforward: lock the Display, flush out any internally buffered requests, and return the sequence number of the last request written. Both libraries need this sequence number for various reasons internally, xcb for example uses it to make sure replies go back to the thread that issued the request.

  • Hackaday Podcast 166: Engraving With The Sun, Explosive Welding, Juggling Chainsaws, And Torturing Wago Connectors

    Join Hackaday Editor-in-Chief Elliot Williams and Staff Writer Dan Maloney as they dive into the last week of Hackaday articles. If you love things that go boom, you won’t want to miss the discussion about explosive welding. Ever use the sun to burn something with a magnifying glass? Now you can CNC that, if you dare. We’ll take a quick trip through the darkroom and look at analog-digital photography as well as a tactical enlarger you can build, watch someone do terrible things to Wago and Wago-adjacent connectors, and talk about how suborbital chainsaws can be leveraged into a mass storage medium. Not enough for you? Then don’t miss our bafflement at one corporation’s attitude toward 3D printing, the secret sauce of resin casting, and our rundown of the 2022 Sci-Fi Contest winners.

  • GRAID SupremeRAID SR-1010: unleashes record-breaking 110GB/sec reads | TweakTown

    The huge 110GB/sec reads are also only in a Linux environment, and on a RAID 5, RAID 6, or RAID 10 array. If you are on a Windows environment then those super-fast read speeds drop rather significantly: 70GB/sec reads (versus 110GB/sec on Linux) and 35GB/sec reads (up from 25GB/sec on Linux).

Games: Steam Deck and Dungeon Crawler Jam

Filed under
Gaming

Linux Devices: Librem, Raspberry Pi, Arduino, and More

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

  • Weekly #LinuxPhone Update (17/2022): Plasma Mobile Gear 22.04, Nemo Mobile 0.9 and Phosh gesture support is inching closer!

    It's saturday, Linux App Summit is taking place. There's some bad news regarding open modem firmware and I am writing this in a train slowly but surely taking me to the sea for some time off.

  • Self Hosted forum with phpBB and Raspberry PI

    King of self-hosted forum platforms, phpBB has a strong story and is spreadly used. As its name suggests, it is based on PHP and is so light that you can run your self-hosted forum with phpBB on Raspberry PI

    In this tutorial, I’m going to show you how to install phpBB and configure your very first topic on a cheap Raspberry PI Zero W.

    phpBB is an open-source (Licensed under the GPLv2) forum software, built with a bulletin board logic, that can link a group of people or can power an entire website. Its features can be extended using extensions that can be installed and configured with few clicks.
    PhpBB includes a customizable registration process for your users, allowing administrators to manage permissions up to a fine level.

  • Improving the Stability and Reliability with a Modular Modem in the Librem 5 – Purism

    Usually we can fully rely on our phones to be reachable at any time—given cellular reception of course—and we take that for granted.

    You surely know situations in your life where that becomes especially critical. Be it when you’re expecting an important call or when you need to be able to receive “emergency” calls in general. The Librem 5 phone is the primary device for the majority of our team, therefore the stability and reliability for us is equally as important for us as our customers.

    The Librem 5 phone is a pretty exceptional device. It’s a general- purpose computer running the same software that laptops run. Plug in a cellular modem into a laptop and you have roughly the same thing in just a different form factor.

    One of the hardest things these days is to get a removable cellular modem card that does audio calls in the first place. It’s a tough market full of proprietary hardware and software where licensing requirements inhibit modems from doing audio calling. For the Librem 5 phone we found one but we can really consider ourselves fortunate as it was and will continue to be a supply chain challenge.

  • DIY SBC cases and SBC Case Builder tool based on OpenSCAD - CNX Software

    Since you can’t always rely on single board computer (SBC) vendors to provide a case to match your needs, some went the DIY route. Willy Tarreau designed some laser-cut enclosures with Inkscape for various SBCs, while hominoids went a step further by developing the “SBC Case Builder” tool to automatically generate various types of 3D printable enclosures using OpenSCAD.

  • Firmware updates, part 1: Bootloader

    This is the first post in a series about doing device firmware updates (DFU) over the air (OTA) and continuous delivery of firmware for embedded devices. We'll explore the different parts of a complete end-to-end system with this capability.

    This post will be about a fundamental component in such a system: the bootloader.

  • Shedding light on power plant control networks

    Like all critical infrastructure sectors, the energy sector has become reliant on automation techniques to monitor and control its networks. However, not much is publicly known about these techniques or the networks that tend to use proprietary protocols and operate in closed settings.

    To address this knowledge gap, we at the Brandenburg University of Technology, recently conducted a project to study the design of industrial control networks that run power plants. Below are some of our key takeaways that we presented recently at PAM 2022.

  • How effective is HTTPS/TLS usage in the consumer IoT ecosystem?

    Unfortunately, little is known about the degree of effectiveness with which IoT devices use TLS. What’s more worrisome is that TLS usage in other non-browser software has been found to be particularly problematic, with some experts calling it “the most dangerous code in the world”.

    To fill this knowledge gap, we at Northeastern University and IMDEA Networks studied ~17M TLS IoT device connections. The following post offers a brief snapshot of what we discovered and presented at IMC 2021.

  • Arduino And Git: Two Views

    You can’t do much development without running into Git, the version control management system. Part of that is because so much code lives on GitHub which uses Git, although you don’t need to know anything about that if all you want to do is download code. [Dr. Torq] has a good primer on using Git with the Arduino IDE, if you need to get your toes wet.

Free Software Leftovers

Filed under
Software

  • What Computer Science Programs Should Teach (IMHO)

    Mostly I’m impressed with the energy out of new graduates, but observing some things, I think I’m not positive that is directly correlated to what colleges are teaching them. There are also a lot of things in industry that I see people lack experience in, and while it’s not the fault of a college program to teach people things, nor even should it be a requirement that someone have a CS degree, these are things that are most easily fixed if they were addressed at this level.

    Well, first off, there is little “Computer Science” in much of anything any of us in the computer industry do. So I think, really, we should just admit that what universities are teaching is “software engineering”. That’s ok. Call it that if it lets you rewrite the curriculum. Even that’s a euphemism though? Should we maybe first admit that too?

  • People of WordPress: Meher Bala

    In this series, we share some of the inspiring stories of how WordPress and its global network of contributors can change people’s lives for the better. This month we feature a Indian-based WordPress developer and long term contributor on how it helped her find a career and a local and global community to belong to.

    WordPress is an inspiration to Meher Bala, a frontend web developer and community builder from India. From using the software as a basic website tool to helping entrepreneurs and good causes around the world fulfill their aspirations, she has overcome personal barriers and now aims to inspire others.

    Meher found her vocation and learned new skills through WordPress. She also discovered a way to encourage other women to consider careers in IT.

  • 8 Photoshop Alternatives for Creating 3D Elements

    Blender is a favorite among 3D designers. Whether you’re creating a scene or a character, there’s not much you can’t do with this software.

    You can use Blender for 3D printing, and like Substance 3D Stager, you can add lighting to your scenes or work with UV maps to create accurate texture mapping in Blender designs. And that’s not even the half of it; check out these Blender tutorials to acquaint yourself with the program.

    Blender’s 3D abilities are definitely more complex than what was offered by Photoshop’s 3D features. It can easily replace some features like 3D text creation and perspective warping.

  • Uncurled

    The uncurled book is now in a state I think I can show off without feeling embarrassed. I believe I will still need to work on it more going forward to add and polish content and make it more coherent and less of a collection of snippets. I hope that I over time can settle down and gradually slow down the change pace. It will of course also depend a lot on the feedback I get.

EU Joins Mastodon Social Network, Sets Up Its Own Server

Filed under
Server

The effort is currently only a pilot, but it represents the EU’s goal of supporting private and open-source software capable of rivaling mainstream social media platforms such as Twitter, Facebook, and YouTube. On the same day, the European Commission also launched an account for PeerTube, another decentralized platform that revolves around video sharing.

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Inform 7 v10.1.0 is now open-source

Filed under
Software

Inform is a design system for interactive fiction based on natural language, and consists of a core compiler, together with extensions, kits and other resources, a number of outlying tools, and documentation, along with applications presenting the system in a friendly way on MacOS, Windows and Linux. This software had been used extensively since 28 April 2006, but by 2016 its source code was in considerable need of modernisation. In part that was wear-and-tear, but it was also the effect of years of experiment in which the code was often built without a full understanding of the concepts it was groping towards. In early 2016, then, a substantial work of renovation began. That work is now essentially complete, and the first results can be seen. The git repository “GitHub - ganelson/inform: The core software distribution for the Inform 7 programming language.” became public today, presenting the complete source and extensive technical documentation. And with that, the whole system was placed under the highly permissive [sic] Artistic License 2.0. This is an open-source licence recognised as such by, for example, the Free Software Foundation.

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More in Tux Machines

Security Leftovers

  • odcast: Why there were 56 OT vulnerabilities this week

    This week we cover the Ericsson mobility report that offers some stats on cellular IoT connections, including the surprising nugget that we won’t see 4G/5G connections surpass 2G/3G connections until some time next year. Then we hit another report. This one is from NPR and covers the state of audio and smart speakers. It proves that growth is slowing for smart speakers and that we may not do as many things with voice as we think. In dystopian news we cover China using COVID tracking apps to lock down protesters, and Microsoft stopping sales of some facial recognition tools. In new product news we talk about the latest Philips Hue gear, a new material that could generate electricity for wearables, and new MCUs from NXP. We also address the closure of SmartDry and explain how Google’s update on the Nest Max Hub may break your Nest x Yale lock. We end by answering a listener question about more accurate motion sensors.

  • Cortex XSOAR Tips & Tricks – Creating indicator relationships in automations

    In Cortex XSOAR, indicators are a key part of the platform as they visualize the Indicators Of Compromise (IOC) of a security alert in the incident to the SOC analyst and can be used in automated analysis workflows to determine the incident outcome. If you have a Cortex XSOAR Threat Intelligence Management (TIM) license, it is possible to create predefined relationships between indicators to describe how they relate to each other. This enables the SOC analyst to do a more efficient incident analysis based on the indicators associated to the incident.

  • Social Engineering Kill–Chain: Predicting, Minimizing & Disrupting Attack Verticals

    It was a Friday afternoon when Bill was on his way back home from work when he received a call that made him take the next U-turn back to his office. It was one of these calls that he was dedicating all of his working hours to avoid. He was not given much detail through the phone, but it seems that Andre, someone working in the account payments department, had just fallen victim to a scam and had proceeded to a hefty payment. A scam? Bill recalled all the training videos he had put this department through. What went wrong?

  • Daycare apps are insecure surveillance dumpster-fires

    Apps are like software, only worse.

  • 12 best patch management software and tools for 2022

    These 12 tools approach patching from different perspectives. Understanding their various approaches can help you find the right product for your needs.

Windows vs Linux: What's the best operating system?

The way you utilise your PC can often depend on the operating system you use as well as your level of technical knowledge. Even though most people will turn to macOS or Windows when deciding on an OS, if you want something you can customise, there's nothing better than Linux. Despite the fact that it isn’t as popular as Windows, Linux offers far more avenues for customisation than any other OS as it's built on an open source foundation. It's certainly more intimidating to the average user as a result, but it can be incredibly powerful, and rewarding, if you possess the skills to fully take advantage of it. Obviously, there are advantages and disadvantages with both systems that are useful to know before making the decision on which is best for you. Read more

today's howtos

  • FreeBSD Quick Guide: Audio on FreeBSD

    Whether for music, communication, or notifications, audio is an important feature of many personal computer systems. In a new FreeBSD system, an audio card will need to be configured to process audio files and send them to the connected speakers. Our newest FreeBSD quick guide will walk through setting up and configuring audio, connecting a pair of headphones (including pairing Bluetooth models), and testing the system’s sound, all in under 10 minutes!

  • Speeding up autoconf with caching - Julio Merino (jmmv.dev)

    In the recent Remembering Buildtool post, I described how setting up a cache of configuration checks was an important step in Buildtool’s installation process. The goal was to avoid pointless repetitive work on every build by performing such common checks once. Episode 457 of BSD Now featured my post and Allan Jude wondered how much time would be saved in a bulk build of all FreeBSD packages if we could just do that same kind of caching with GNU Autoconf. And, you know what? It is indeed possible to do so. I had mentioned it en passing in my post but I guess I wasn’t clear enough, so let’s elaborate!

  • How To Put Linux On A Laptop

    Linux is an operating system that comes with different distributions like Ubuntu, Debian, and Arch Linux. Just like macOS and Windows, Linux is also a popular operating system that is installed on computers and laptops to manage the hardware of the respective machine and perform the different tasks requested by the users. In this guide, different ways of installing or putting the Linux operating system on a laptop have been discussed.

  • What Is cURL Command and How to Use It (With Examples)

    This article explains the curl command in Linux and how to use it with examples based on best practices.

Raspberry Pi and Raspberry Pi Pico Projects

  • Tiny Raspberry Pi Zero 2 W Robot Made For Robot Sumo | Tom's Hardware

    The Raspberry Pi in robotics is a smart mix—but what happens if the kit you ordered doesn’t support the Pi? You get creative like maker and developer WallComputer, of course! In this Raspberry Pi Zumo project, they've converted the classic Pololu Arduino Zumo kit to support the latest Raspberry Pi Zero 2 W. This tiny robot uses tank-like treads to get around, which provide the traction needed for Sumo robots designed to push each other around. Traditionally this type of robot is controlled by an Arduino Uno, but this version uses both a Raspberry Pi Zero 2 W and an STM32 microcontroller with a little help from a couple of custom PCBs. To see how much has been modified, take a look at the original product listing for the Zumo kit over at Pololu’s website. This modification was not only necessary to use the Pi, but also to add additional features like a rechargeable battery pack.

  • Best Raspberry Pi Deals 2022 | Tom's Hardware

    With more than 40 million units sold and a powerful community of makers and fans behind it, Raspberry Pi is more than a single-board computer; it's a huge platform with an even bigger ecosystem behind it. Whether you want to build your own robot, create an A.I.-powered security camera, or just set up a simple computer for programming and web surfing, the Pi is for you.

  • Raspberry Pi Pico Drives $10 Nintendo 64 Flash Cart | Tom's Hardware

    We love retro gaming on the Raspberry Pi but there’s nothing quite like retro gaming with a Raspberry Pi. Instead of running an emulator on a Pi, this Raspberry Pi Pico Nintendo 64 cart project, created by maker and developer Konrad Beckmann, is using the Raspberry Pi Pico to host a ROM that runs on the original Nintendo 64 console. I built a working Nintendo 64 flash cart with a Raspberry Pi Pico, a breakout board and some extra flash for less than $10.It boots Super Mario 64. Can't wait to optimize, improve and add more features to it!Lots of stuff left before it's ready for general users though. pic.twitter.com/C1qVaTTfHiJune 22, 2022

  • Raspberry Pi Pico Detects Gamma Rays in Open Spectroscopy Project | Tom's Hardware

    There are many useful things you can do with a Raspberry Pi Pico (opens in new tab), as our listing of the best Raspberry Pi Projects (opens in new tab) underlines. However, here’s one we admit we’d never thought of: detecting radiation. Physicist Matthias Rosezky, AKA Nuclear Phoenix (opens in new tab), whose work has also been covered by Hackaday (opens in new tab), has written up a detailed account of building a DIY gamma-ray spectrometer in IEEE Spectrum (opens in new tab).