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ubuntu and the eee

Why is the choice of distribution so important and contentious?

A quick question to help shed some light on this topic. You needn't bother reading my blabble, just the usual rantings but I would like to see some views on why this whole area generates so much emotion when basically every distribution is a Yum or Apt away from being exactly the same as the next.

My distro is redder than yours, so ner!

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Linux

What is needed here is a celebrity distro match, battle to the death. And in the blue corner, weighing in at 70lbs, wearing knobbly knees and a tank top, master of the inane, lord or pointlessness, it's Faaaaaaaanboy! And in the orangy corner, weighing in at 71.123984775lbs, taking into account a floating point error, compiled 1 second faster, the spark of the unholy distro...'buntu basher masher.

These are not the sources we're looking for

Open Source and funky free ethics are no match for a good expensive closed application installed kid. There's a disturbance in the source.

Educating the masses and squabbling at the distrotech

The user doesn’t care what the operating system is, they are not installing it to use an operating system, they are installing it for the things they can install and run on it… can they use their word, excel, PowerPoint docs… how? Can they play their CDs? How? Can they watch a DVD from their collection? How? If all those names, IBM, Novell etc, were shown in an ad, people would have a lot more confidence to try and see. That’s all Linux needs them to do, try one. Any one. They are all united under the march of the penguin.

Distro Install Cold Turkey

Isn't it annoying how things in life pop up and get in the way of what you actually intended to do?

kubuntu vs MS ISA Proxy ft apt-get

Getting adept at updates behind enemy lines, a quick guide to get your updates running through MS ISA Proxy. Also known as NTLMAPS to the rescue!

From Russia with Linux (hangover)

From the Banya to the ice cold linux pond for a warm welcome with a bottle of Chivas Regal and stomach full of vodka! Piroshki anyone?

Flying laptops and yet another Kubuntu install epic.

Ok so it's been relatively quiet from me these past few weeks. The need of many (bills) outweighs the need of the few (hours free). But that’s not the end of it. Oh no indeed. You see, now I have a new laptop and this means endless hours farting around trying to get it to work. And why is that I hear you ask? Well, just when I had finally got my old laptop into a workable state with Kubuntu happily chugging away I had a little 'accident'...........

54G, Retro crisis and terrible teens.

This week has been a sort of non-event. Although I did get a refund on a parking ticket as mentioned in some previous spurious blog. Had a call from a friend, she had just bought a new wireless card and was struggling to get it connected. The Knoppix I installed on her laptop is running fine but something I have generally found with Linux is that once it is working, leave it well alone! I asked why she had bought the new card. "It's a 'G' and it's faster than my 'B', Internet has been slow'. Hmmm, Internet slow. How do you explain this one?

Spectrums, rubber keys, parking fines, OpenLDAP and replacement windows

The installation went fine (in a roundabout sort of way). Oh yes, there were the niggles and gripes, teething problems, times that I had to resort to the beating the insolent teenager of technology with a hammer to get it to work, but in the end it did just that. What on earth am I talking about? Well... the customer of mine, Mr Windows, is now Mr Linux (apart from a couple PCs) and so is his network of around 100 or so workstations. Working like a charm (or curse?). I didn't have the heart to tell him that I was learning this stuff as I went along, that would have probably put the fear of God into his chequebook and his writing hand. I’ll keep the patient under constant observation for a while until it can be taken out of critical care but the prognosis is looking good and the transplant is looking to be a success. Wipe please Nurse! Scalpel, backup tape, CD.

Hurts when vista boots you in the DRM's

With Microsoft building a lot around HDCP, DRM into vista and most LCD panels not supporting it, what will be the upgrade cost? Not only will I have to change the two new 20" goggle boxes I've just bought, I'll need to change the graphics card too.

Selling the dream

it took a long conversation, many demos of Kubuntu (it's still on the laptop, week 4 now! Whey!) and many beers to let me in with a proposed demo to pitch against his MS setup. A mini network, a couple of users from each team, typists, accounts, orders, processing etc. If it works he'll take it on, if not, then nothing has been lost but my time and a stupid bet involving being Naked, Guinness, vindaloo, traffic cone and a stop watch.

Kubuntu Clash: Should I stay or should I go?

Over the past month or so I have been dipping my big toe into the Linux pool, just testing the waters. The reason for a move to Linux isn't one based on the love of open source, free choice or free software, the reason is far more capital, the devil drives when the bills need paying, work. Anyway, over the past weeks of swimming with Linux I've had less sleep than I have in a long long while, I've been more frustrated, argumentative, pounding the keyboard and flicking the finger(s) at the screen. Is this the norm?

Grumpy old git!

Why is it that some drivers, on open roads, fail to see the speed limit signs? Why? I don't mean they are speeding, I mean they are driving slower. Much slower. 25mph in a 30mph zone, 40mph in a 50mph zone! Come on! These are open roads with no room to overtake it is so frustrating! And that white circle with a black line? IT MEANS 60MPH NOT 40!!! (motorway 70 accepted)

Baby did a bad bad thing....

Well from the last thing I wrote in here somewhere (being new means you have no idea where things are), things have changed on the laptop front. After writing some good things about Ubuntu I stumbled across some articles on Suse floating around the 'net and up pops the thought, "perhaps I didn't give it a proper go". Dangerous thought, very dangerous.

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More in Tux Machines

Docker 1.13, Containers, and DevOps

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Kernel Space/Linux

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