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srlinuxx's blog

Yikes! Mad Cow Cover-Up?

Dr. Lester Friedlander, a former USDA vet, said that inspectors are allowed only 15 seconds of inspection and that unhygenic practices are common in the meat industry; practices such as cow carcass abscesses being hosed off, wrapped up and shipped to the consumer. He also states that some supervisors were more concerned about falsifying inspection documents than protecting consumers.

Where's the beef?

err, I mean beta? Wasn't mandrak^H^Hiva supposed to release a 2006 beta 1 on the 15th? I've not seen any mention of it on the cooker mailing list or sign on the mirrors. Seems they are having some troubles, but that's a business as usual (for any developing distro). They were having some mirror syncing problems a few days back, I experienced this first hand when I tried to update my cooker install as well as some conflict with kde packages. There might be some shorewall bug problems, there's some mention of libtool gcc compatibility, and some grub conflicts a day or two ago. Anyway, I keep looking for a beta everyday. Somebody poke me if they see it.

Holy Multitasking Batman

While perusing my favorite thread of my favorite site I saw this setup. The appropriate witty response failed me as I first thought "You need to get to work son" or "quit wasting time" or perhaps "you should take up computing"... my mind raced around as all I could utter was "holy cow".

Anyway, I thought it was interesting enough to folks that don't visit the gentoo forums to list here.

The owner's, baeksu, description.

My MiniSlack Memoirs

I knew when I published my MiniSlack review that I might get some unkind comments, and I thought I was prepared. By the end of the day I guess I wasn't. I thought one poster was going to be helpful and constructive, but his final post drove me to disable comments and delete the posts made. I received a private message from one gentleman who may have been disappointed by my results, but at least he was respectful, professional, and helpful. He has provoked this commentary.

One Fine Trick

Those cute Southpark icons on the right of his desktop represent folks in his instant messenger list. They change coloration to indicate their online status. Ain't that the neato-ist thing?

Recent Review Rounds

Filed under
Reviews

I've had some successes and not so successful adventures. I got stampeded by Buffalo, a distro whose name intrigued me. I didn't achieve any yingyang with Zen, whose logo was so darn cute. And my fruit went sour with Berry, whose motif was quite appetizing.

My latest efforts are with Lunar. After I finally discovered the commands Lunar uses to install software, I was on my way. I didn't tweak any compile flags or set up distcc, but it's still kinda neato to watch it compile up your applications from scratch. I don't think Lunar is for everyone, as it's taken a little coaxing at times, but i got xorg and the kde desktop installed and running, as well as xawtv!

Downtime

Filed under
Site News

Sorry for the downtime, it's been a rough day. Not only was my Symphony story getting a lot of play, but I was also the subject of ddos attacks on the site and my mail server. It seems to have subsided some now, and I'm back up. I do apologize.

I been Buffalo'd

Filed under
Reviews

Buffalo Linux 1.7.3 was released on May 10 and it sounded quite interesting. I'd visted their website a couple times in the past but never installed this oddly named distro. Now with the site up and running I thought the time was right.

DOOM: The Movie update

Filed under
News

Arrrgs. I go to gamespy just about everyday but somehow I missed this cool Doom3 movie update. It sounds pretty cool. They even have some great stills! It looks like it's gonna be exciting - I am excited - I can hardly wait.

The Site: first quarter report

Filed under
Site News

Today marks the anniversary of my first quarter year actually getting hits. I started a little website last July actually, but I started getting some reads when I installed drupal then began posting a few links to stories on Feb. 04 and finally posted my first original article on Feb. 08.

We have since grown to over 100,000 hits last month. I hope to continue to grow as I learn what the audience wants to read. My hopes also include promoting Linux and helping the world see the advantages of oss while having lots of fun in the process. Because to me, that's the biggest advantage of running Linux - it's just plain fun.

Heyyyy, /My/ Screenshots on Ebay!?

Filed under
Humor

What's up with that!? Someone scarfed some of my screenshots to help sell cheap home-made Mandriva dvds. Think I should get some royalties? Big Grin Oh well, least he linked to my review. That Ebay link.

May Enlightenment

Filed under
Just talk

I installed kde cvs a week or so back after posting my Month with Fluxbox - Part 2, yet I always seemed to choose fluxbox when it came time to log into X. I very much enjoyed running fluxbox, but I'm gonna run enlightment during May and see how it goes.

A teehee

Filed under
Humor

In reply during a conversation with a good friend, I received this funny with the line, "yeah, but did you have to post about it?" lol He's a nutcase!

A Month With Fluxbox - Part 2

Filed under
Reviews

My month with Fluxbox can almost be officially over and it's time to report on my experiences as promised. I wish I had a long list of complaints to file or problems for which I had to find answers or even less than compelling reasons to run back to KDE (i.e. something interesting or controversial to write about). But the truth is, it sat back there serving up my windows and never once gave me reason to even notice it was there. And that's a good thing.

General Hardware Tips

Filed under
Howtos

I saw this thread in the gentoo forums with some wonderful information for folks experiencing hardware failures or inconsistencies, boot failures, or data loss and the ilk. I think it might be helpful to some, so I thought I'd post a link to it.

Thread.

RoE Will Soon Come to Linux

I read from a link of a link today that Doom: Resurrection of Evil will be supported on Linux come Doom 3 patch 1.3. Big Grin yippee.

Neato Pic

Filed under
Just talk

My sister sent me this Kincaid gif this morning. I thought it was kinda neato so I figured I'd share. It don't have anything to do with anything, but...

Performance Tweaks & Tips

Filed under
Howtos

Has your system seemed to have slowed down lately or perhaps it never performed the way you thought it should. Do you ever exclaim, seems my friend's computer is much faster than mine... or the dreaded, my XP is faster than linux? Bite your tongue and check out a few things on your gentoo install.

I don my asbestos house robe and share a few things I've learned from my time with gentoo. Actually these principals can be applied to any linux installation, but I had gentoo in mind when writing them.

New Logo

Filed under
Site News

Just wanted to post a big THANK YOU to jrangels for donating his time and wonderful talent to make us a great new logo and header background image here at tuxmachines.org. You might know his work from being offered on kde-look.org or from being the primary graphic artist for pclinuxos. His newest work for that distro is on display in the tuxgallery. Mosey on by and take a look before you leave.

Thanks again Jose.

Mini Distro Round-Up

Filed under
Reviews

Distributions that can fit on a mini-cd are today's answer to the floppy distros of yesteryear. Those floppy distros were so handy for those quick repairs, setting up a filesystem on a new harddrive, or just killing a Saturday night. Nothing like the satisfaction of overcoming the difficulties getting MuLinux to dial up to the internet or even boot into a mini X. Hal was my favorite though. I still have my Hal floppy. They were just plain fun!

Today we have our mini-distros too, some as small as 50MB. There isn't much of a challenge these days though, just boot and go. With a weekend off from work, I thought I'd get reacquainted with an old friend and hopefully make some new ones. I test drove 5 of the smallest distros I could find and I'll tell you what I discovered.

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