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srlinuxx's blog

This is "See Ya Around"

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Site News

I started to say "this is goodbye," but just because I sold the site doesn't mean I won't be around Linuxville. I'm still writing at ostatic and I may turn up here now and again as well. I'll be looking around to expand my writing after the new year too, so you're not rid of me yet. But the sale on tuxmachines.org has been completed.

Sold! (tentatively)

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Site News

I guess tuxmachines.org has been sold for $1000. I know it's kinda low, but times have changed and the new owner plans to carry on the tuxmachines tradition.

going twice

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Site News

going twice

fair warning - going once....

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Site News

Well, I think I'm going to accept one of the two $1000 bids received, unless anyone else wants to bid...

Tuxmachines.org for sale (update)

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Site News

I've decided to try and see if anyone might be interested in buying and doing something with my domain and site. So, today, I'm posting this ad here: tuxmachines.org for sale.


Update: I've received some bids and will decide by Monday....

sorry so slow

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Site News

Sorry I've slowed down on gathering the interesting news lately. I think my blood pressure is back up or something. I'm trying to get a dr appointment. But I'm trying to get back up to speed. Thanks for your patience.

blogstop javascript

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Site News

Man, I hate those blogspot blogs that require javascript (or something) to display the basic text of the article they wish linked to. Sometimes I just close konqueror and don't.

SOL

Filed under
Linux

Wonder how many journalists are waiting for the SOL to fail so they can use the headline "SOL is Shit Out of Luck?" (Not /me/ of course, but I do smell a poll question in there somewhere).

Del is ambiguous

Filed under
Linux

New KDE 4.10.5 is more like Windows than ever. Fresh new warning says "The key sequence 'Del' is ambiguous. Use 'Configure Shortcuts' from the 'Settings' menu to solve the ambiguity. No action will be triggered." Great, after 14 years of using KDE and the Del key to delete unwanted mail, all of a sudden said Del key is ambiguious. What's ambiguious about Del? Del means delete. No means no....

Big Thank You to All

Filed under
Site News

Despite the economy and my decreased traffic, I'd say the donation drive was a success. I saw a lot of familiar names of those who had given before as well as some new ones. Ad revenue was up as well.

Softpedia

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Site News

Linking to Softpedia.com articles has always presented a bit of a moral dilemma. They cover things that others don't or many times identify an angle no one else has. I like their little news blurbs. But I don't like that they link to downloads on their own server instead of the source.

TM Donation Drive, Updates

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Site News

Our donation drive has been going well and we thank all so much, as we do those that allowed ads for my site. But it seems to be winding down, pledges have seemed to have stopped. I'll leave up the reminder up a few more days maybe, but then we'll conclude the 2013 Donation Drive. Report and formal thank you to follow. Please see the donation page if you'd like to help.

I'm running Mint

Filed under
Linux

I needed a fresh install on a safe partition today and thought I'd try Korora 19, but alas, I've ended up using Mint 15 KDE (rc). So, far so good...

back up & running

Filed under
Site News

Sorry for the unusually long delay. I forget how long it really takes to set up a new system these days what with having to "archive" crap first then "importing" them instead of copying a directory of nice text files or <gasp> linking to the old directory or file... I'm starting to have Windows flashbacks... oh, sorry. Anywho, ole Akregator is doing its thing pulling in today's headlines now.

disk trouble

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Site News

I've been having trouble with my disk lately. I'm not sure if it's the disk or my install, but it looks a whole lot like a disk dying. So, it'll take me a few hours to get back up and running before I can search for cool news links. Sorry, and I'll get back as soon as I can. Thanks!

ah-ha! That's why Korora

Filed under
Linux

When Kororaa changed their name to Korora I wondered why? But today I think I've spotted the real reason.

TM Donation Drive

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Site News

We haven't had a donation drive since 2011 and now is a good time. As some of you know, I recently lost one of my gigs and I've yet to replace that income. After a protracted illness, I'm feeling much better these days and have tried to ramp up my work around here. If you'd like to help keep TM coming to you, please see my donation page for details how to help.

Half-Life

Filed under
Linux

I've been playing Half-Life recently, something to which I've looked forward for quite some time. I did get it playing under Wine years ago, but I thought I only got a little ways. I'm stuck In the Rails right now, but I remember this level.

Don't Forget Feeds

Filed under
Site News

Even when I'm not able to update the site as much as I would like, please note the feeds Tuxmachines pulls in. In the side columns below the fold are Linux.com, LinuxToday.com, and more. On the news feed page is a wider variety.

Help with Hardware Guess?

Well, I hoped the hardware issue of earlier was just a scare, but apparently not. Now my machine locked up while idling. What do you think, motherboard?

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