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bigbearomaha's blog

Exploring Strange New Worlds...

Filed under
Just talk

I've seen it discussed before, but it sometimes doesn't really hit me until I see where someone who is talking around it, completely misses it.

Of course, I'm talking about the Star Trek influence. How close are we to realizing Star Trek Technology?

Personal Computing on the fly

Filed under
Linux

The cloud. It's the talk of the town and has been growing for awhile now.

Linux Can Take Over If It Sticks To What It Does Best. Appliances

Filed under
Linux

Everyone is always so fixated on desktop Linux and why it can't get decent numbers in the desktop market.

The answer is obvious. You can't come late into the game when someone has a huge installed base and expect to win based on free over easy.

Looking at the computer experience

Filed under
Linux

Just a bit of rambling about Linux, as well as reflections and meanderings about computer history in general

A Year Into Linux Mint Debian Edition

Filed under
Reviews

LMDE is a mixed bag. On one hand, you get a Debian install with the Mint specific user software that makes the end user a very nice experience. On the other hand, it's still being tweaked and played with. This can lead to some frustration with apps that haven't had all the kinks worked out yet.

Tabletop RPG's in a Linux World

Everyone knows about video games and the issues facing them in Linux. Not as many people are aware though that tabletop role Playing Games are experiencing a bit of a surge in popularity and that Linux and other open source software are able to assist in that growth.

What Does Linux and Role Playing Games Have in Common?

As a recently revived Game Master/DM going back to my RPG roots in Advanced Dungeons & Dragons, 1st Edition after about a 20 year absence, I find that computer technology has impacted Role Playing Games far beyond being able to play online.

Big Bear's Helpful Hints-Google Docs Spreadsheets

Filed under
Howtos

I like to jot down things that I learn how to do on the spur of the moment so that I can find it later.

I admit, in the 80's there was quite of bit of "herbal remedy" usage and my short term memory isn't what it could be. That's my story and I'm sticking to it.

I've decided that I might as well potentially help some other folks who might want to know about some of the things I discover, so I thought why not here?

For my very first post, I wanted to figure out how to sum cells across multiple pages in Google Docs spreadsheets.

Tomboy and Dropbox, the Dynamic Duo

Filed under
Linux

I just saw an article headline about Tomboy and it's strengths. It made me think about all the reasons I use Tomboy and perhaps my favorite reason for using it.

I use Dropbox because I like having access to files regardless of what computer I'm using or where I'm at. It is extremely helpful to me.

Looking for help to bring a new app to the world

Aloha folks,

For those programmers, packagers, etc... who might be looking to help on a new project, maybe you will find this interesting.

Cloud computing on Linux can help small business

Big companies like RedHat are getting into Software as a Service, otherwise known as "cloud computing".

School computer introductions

Filed under
Just talk

After reading an article recently on a similar topic, I got to thinking about what I was introduced to relating to computers when I was in school.

I was in high school when I got my first real introduction to computers.

Paranoia and criticism, how it was meant and how it is taken

Filed under
Linux

It's interesting to see how many people automatically associate criticism with "Anti-X distro".

One Linux to rule them all

There is a whole lot of noise being made about Googles OS announcement.

Most of it being made by raving distro fanboys who believe that by pledging their allegiance to one distro will make part of the 'cool crowd'

"No thanks Google, we have Ubuntu/Debian/Gentoo/pick one"

OpenSource Software Bounty Hunters

Wanted!

OpenSource developers to make software people actually want and need.

Bounty offered

See Sheriff for details

One computers' Linux experience

I suppose , in answer to the question "When will Linux be ready for the user desktop?"

It was ready almost two years ago in this house. Children use it daily, as well as computer phobic wives and memory challenged mad computer geniuses. (The 'genius' part is up for speculation.)

HackMy...phase II

For those of you who don't know, Hackmy... forums started out as a "advanced" forum for users of PCLinuxOS.

HackMy has moved to a new host and has a whole new look and goal though. Hackmy is now open to users of Linux, ANY distro.

How about "just using" instead of "migrating"?

Filed under
Linux

Take a big, deep breath and repeat after me, "There is no perfect OS, there is no perfect OS".

OK, fine, now read this.

The worlds best Linux Distro is now available.

Filed under
Humor

Here it is, the earth shaking, mind breaking, hip shaking est Linux distro ever. It will do "all dat" and more.

Want to know more about it? Knock on the big green emerald doors and ask to see the wizard.

Some Reasons NOT to use Linux. Ever. At all.

Filed under
Just talk

Reasons to not even bother trying Linux, ever : ( cue drum roll... )

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More in Tux Machines

Party Like It's 1987 - PC-MOS/386 Goes Open Source

The idea of a multi-user operating system is almost a tautology today but back in the 1980s it wasn't all that common - at least when it came to personal computing. PC-MOS was a multi-user operating system that, like DR-DOS and others, competed with Microsoft's MS-DOS before eventually disappearing at the Redmond juggernaut crushed almost all its competition. Now, Roeland Jansen, Gary Robertson and Rod Roark have put the operating system onto GitHub as an open source project so we can all mess with its source code. Read more

Android, Android on Desktops (Android-x86), Samsung Galaxy on Desktop/DeX

  • Pixel 2 Has Screen Burn-In Problem, Google Says They’re “Actively Investigating” The Report
    Android Central has reported that their Pixel 2 XL review unit is having screen burn-in issues. That’s a bad thing for the latest made-by-Google flagship which was announced earlier on October 4, ditching the headphone jack.
  • Android-x86 7.1-rc2 Now Supports NVMe SSDs, Better QEMU VirGL
    The Android-x86 project derived from Google's Android Open-Source Project code-base remains officially at Android 6.0, but there is an Android 7.1 "Nougat" build available for testing. Quietly released earlier this month was a second release candidate based on Android 7.1. The Android-x86 7.1-RC2 release is based on upstream AOSP 7.1-RC2 / Nougat-MR2 along with some extra improvements for this x86-targeted build.
  • What To Do When The Power Button Of Your Android Phone Is Broken?
  • Samsung is adding Linux support for DeX with the new ‘Linux on Galaxy’ app
    Since Samsung debuted the DeX feature earlier this year with the Galaxy S8 and Galaxy S8+ smartphones, the company has been making small changes to improve the whole experience of using your smartphone as a PC. In order to further enhance Samsung DeX, the company has announced “Linux on Galaxy”, an app that will let developers run Linux-based distributions on their mobile device, allowing them to code on-the-go. The app is DeX-enabled, which means developers can code on a bigger device, powered by their Galaxy S8, Galaxy S8+ or Galaxy Note8.
  • You can run any Linux distro on Samsung smartphones using Linux with Galaxy App
    The convergence of a smartphone with a PC/laptop is not new and has been in making for several years. In fact, the idea of such a convergence started with Nokia’s Communicator phone launched in 1996 when it was the undisputed king of feature phone and mobile phone arena. Ubuntu devs tried a similar theme with the now-dead Ubuntu for smartphones and tablets. The Ubuntu os was launched with the idea to run full Linux apps on your smartphone. The smartphone even gave users an option to connect a keyboard, mouse, and display. However, that did not sell.

Linux Foundation Announcements: CIP, OpenMessaging, CDLA

  • Civil Infrastructure Platform Announces the Release of CIP Core
    Hosted by The Linux Foundation, CIP addresses the needs of long-term software for the power generation and distribution, water, oil and gas, transportation and building automation industries. CIP members such as Codethink, Hitachi, Plat'Home, Renesas, Siemens and Toshiba are working to create a reliable and secure Linux-based embedded software platform that can be sustained more than 10 years and up to 60 years.
  • Linux Foundation Launches OpenMessaging Project
    ​Through a shared exertion bnb m from endeavors and groups put resources into the cloud, enormous information, and standard APIs, I'm eager to welcome the OpenMessaging project from The Linux Foundation. The OpenMessaging group will likely make a comprehensively embraced, merchant impartial, and open standard for dispersed informing that can be conveyed in the cloud, on-commence, and half and half utilize cases.
  • Linux Foundation Debuts Community Data License Agreement
    he Linux Foundation, the nonprofit advancing professional open source management for mass collaboration, today announced the Community Data License Agreement (CDLA) family of open data agreements. In an era of expansive and often underused data, the CDLA licenses are an effort to define a licensing framework to support collaborative communities built around curating and sharing "open" data.
  • The Linux Foundation Releases Three New Open Source Guides for the Enterprise
    The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, has released the next three in a series of Open Source Guides for the Enterprise, created to help executives, open source program managers, developers, attorneys and other decision makers learn how to best leverage open source. These three new guides add to the six released last month at Open Source Summit North America.

openSUSE Tumbleweed Linux OS Patched Against WPA2 KRACK Bug, GCC 6 Now Removed

If you're using the openSUSE Tumbleweed operating system, you should know that one of the latest snapshots removed the GCC (GNU Compiler Collection) 6 packages from the default install and patched it against the WPA2 KRACK security vulnerability. Read more