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bigbearomaha's blog

Exploring Strange New Worlds...

Filed under
Just talk

I've seen it discussed before, but it sometimes doesn't really hit me until I see where someone who is talking around it, completely misses it.

Of course, I'm talking about the Star Trek influence. How close are we to realizing Star Trek Technology?

Personal Computing on the fly

Filed under
Linux

The cloud. It's the talk of the town and has been growing for awhile now.

Linux Can Take Over If It Sticks To What It Does Best. Appliances

Filed under
Linux

Everyone is always so fixated on desktop Linux and why it can't get decent numbers in the desktop market.

The answer is obvious. You can't come late into the game when someone has a huge installed base and expect to win based on free over easy.

Looking at the computer experience

Filed under
Linux

Just a bit of rambling about Linux, as well as reflections and meanderings about computer history in general

A Year Into Linux Mint Debian Edition

Filed under
Reviews

LMDE is a mixed bag. On one hand, you get a Debian install with the Mint specific user software that makes the end user a very nice experience. On the other hand, it's still being tweaked and played with. This can lead to some frustration with apps that haven't had all the kinks worked out yet.

Tabletop RPG's in a Linux World

Everyone knows about video games and the issues facing them in Linux. Not as many people are aware though that tabletop role Playing Games are experiencing a bit of a surge in popularity and that Linux and other open source software are able to assist in that growth.

What Does Linux and Role Playing Games Have in Common?

As a recently revived Game Master/DM going back to my RPG roots in Advanced Dungeons & Dragons, 1st Edition after about a 20 year absence, I find that computer technology has impacted Role Playing Games far beyond being able to play online.

Big Bear's Helpful Hints-Google Docs Spreadsheets

Filed under
Howtos

I like to jot down things that I learn how to do on the spur of the moment so that I can find it later.

I admit, in the 80's there was quite of bit of "herbal remedy" usage and my short term memory isn't what it could be. That's my story and I'm sticking to it.

I've decided that I might as well potentially help some other folks who might want to know about some of the things I discover, so I thought why not here?

For my very first post, I wanted to figure out how to sum cells across multiple pages in Google Docs spreadsheets.

Tomboy and Dropbox, the Dynamic Duo

Filed under
Linux

I just saw an article headline about Tomboy and it's strengths. It made me think about all the reasons I use Tomboy and perhaps my favorite reason for using it.

I use Dropbox because I like having access to files regardless of what computer I'm using or where I'm at. It is extremely helpful to me.

Looking for help to bring a new app to the world

Aloha folks,

For those programmers, packagers, etc... who might be looking to help on a new project, maybe you will find this interesting.

Cloud computing on Linux can help small business

Big companies like RedHat are getting into Software as a Service, otherwise known as "cloud computing".

School computer introductions

Filed under
Just talk

After reading an article recently on a similar topic, I got to thinking about what I was introduced to relating to computers when I was in school.

I was in high school when I got my first real introduction to computers.

Paranoia and criticism, how it was meant and how it is taken

Filed under
Linux

It's interesting to see how many people automatically associate criticism with "Anti-X distro".

One Linux to rule them all

There is a whole lot of noise being made about Googles OS announcement.

Most of it being made by raving distro fanboys who believe that by pledging their allegiance to one distro will make part of the 'cool crowd'

"No thanks Google, we have Ubuntu/Debian/Gentoo/pick one"

OpenSource Software Bounty Hunters

Wanted!

OpenSource developers to make software people actually want and need.

Bounty offered

See Sheriff for details

One computers' Linux experience

I suppose , in answer to the question "When will Linux be ready for the user desktop?"

It was ready almost two years ago in this house. Children use it daily, as well as computer phobic wives and memory challenged mad computer geniuses. (The 'genius' part is up for speculation.)

HackMy...phase II

For those of you who don't know, Hackmy... forums started out as a "advanced" forum for users of PCLinuxOS.

HackMy has moved to a new host and has a whole new look and goal though. Hackmy is now open to users of Linux, ANY distro.

How about "just using" instead of "migrating"?

Filed under
Linux

Take a big, deep breath and repeat after me, "There is no perfect OS, there is no perfect OS".

OK, fine, now read this.

The worlds best Linux Distro is now available.

Filed under
Humor

Here it is, the earth shaking, mind breaking, hip shaking est Linux distro ever. It will do "all dat" and more.

Want to know more about it? Knock on the big green emerald doors and ask to see the wizard.

Some Reasons NOT to use Linux. Ever. At all.

Filed under
Just talk

Reasons to not even bother trying Linux, ever : ( cue drum roll... )

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EU Law Threatens Free/Open Source Software

  • EU votes on copyright law that could kill memes and open source software
    The European Union has passed an initial vote in favour of the Copyright Directive, a legislation experts say "threatens the internet". As reported by Wired, the mandate is designed to update internet copyright law but contains two controversial clauses. Ultimately, it could force prominent online platforms to censor their users' content before it's posted—which could impact everyone from meme creators to open source software designers and livestreamers. Despite passing a vote yesterday—held by the EU's Legal Affairs Committee (JURI)—the directive needs parliamentary approval before becoming law.
  • The EU Parliament Legal Affairs Committee Vote on Directive on Copyright, David Clark Cause and IBM's Call for Code, Equus' New WHITEBOX OPEN Server Platform and More
    Yesterday the European Parliament Legal Affairs Committee voted in favor of "the most harmful provisions of the proposed Directive on Copyright in the Digital Single Market", Creative Commons reports. The provisions include the Article 11 "link tax", which requires "anyone using snippets of journalistic content to first get a license or pay a fee to the publisher for its use online." The committee also voted in favor of Article 13, which "requires online platforms to monitor their users' uploads and try to prevent copyright infringement through automated filtering." There are still several steps to get through before the Directive is completely adopted. See EDRi for more information.
  • GitHub: Changes to EU copyright law could derail open source distribution
  • The E.U. votes to make memes essentially illegal
    On Wednesday, European Parliament’s Committee on Legal Affairs voted to essentially make memes illegal. The decision came as part of the approval process for the innocuously named “Article 13,” which would require larger sites to scan all user uploads using content recognition technology in an attempt to flag any and all remotely copyrighted material in photos, text, music, videos, and more. Meaning memes using stills from copyrighted films could be auto-blocked, along with remixes of viral videos, and basically anything that’s popular on live-streaming sites like Twitch.
  • Europe takes step towards 'censorship machines' for internet uploads
    A key committee at the European Parliament has voted for a new provision in a legislative act that forces tech giants and other online platforms to share revenues with publishers. It is known as Article 13, and is part of an updating of the Copyright Directive. Article 13 proposes that large websites use “content recognition technologies” to scan for copyrighted materials, though it doesn’t explain how this works in practice. This means texts, sounds and even code which get uploaded have to go through an automated filtering system, potentially threatening the creation of memes and open-source software developers.

The EC’s Expected Decision Against Android Is an Unfortunate Attack on Open Source Software

The European Commission (“EC”) is preparing to release its decision against Android, and its framing of the issues makes clear that successful open source software will have a hard time in Europe. In its Statement of Objections, the Commission signaled that Apple’s iOS, Android’s fiercest rival, would be excluded from the market definition because it is closed source and not available to other hardware makers. The decision is expected to declare unlawful strategies to monetize a free product, provide a consistent user experience to customers expecting the Google brand, and to maintain code consistency to minimize problems for developers using the platform. The decision is not expected to contain any indication on how open source platform developers can solve these problems that are fundamental to their success. Read more

Google, IBM and Microsoft

  • Five Common Chromebook Myths Debunked
    When Chromebooks first came out in 2011, they were basically just low-spec laptops that could access web apps – fine for students maybe, but not to be regarded as serious computers. While they’ve become more popular (the low cost, simplicity, and dependability appeal to businesses and education systems), as of 2018 Chromebooks still haven’t managed to become widely accepted as a Windows/Apple/Linux alternative. That may be about to change. The humble Chromebook has gotten a lot of upgrades, so let’s get ourselves up to speed on some things that just aren’t true anymore. [...] The 2011 Chrome OS was pretty bare-bones, but it’s gone to the opposite extreme since then. Not only is it steadily blurring the line between Chrome and Android, it can now install and run some Windows programs as well, at the same time as a Chrome and an Android app, if you like. And hey, while you’re at it, why not open a Linux app as well? You can already install Linux on a Chromebook if you want, but one of the next versions of Chrome OS is going to include a Linux virtual machine accessible right from your desktop (which is already possible, just not built-in and user-friendly). In sum, Chrome OS has gone from barely being an operating system to one that can run apps from four other OSes at the same time.
  • Like “IBM’s Work During the Holocaust”: Inside Microsoft, Growing Outrage Over a Contract with ICE
  • Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo: S11E15 – Fifteen Minutes - Ubuntu Podcast
    ...Microsoft getting into hot water over their work with US Immigration and Customs Enforcement. Plus we round up the community news.