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fieldyweb's blog

Tiny USB Stick Brings Android to PCs, TVs

Filed under
Just talk

FXI essentially built an ultra-lean computer inside a small USB stick. Stick it into any device that supports USB storage, and Cotton Candy will register as a USB drive. From there, you can run the Android OS in a secure environment inside your desktop, courtesy of a Windows/OSX/Linux-compatible virtualization client embedded in the device.

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Alfred.. An app launcher for the Mac..

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Just talk

There is an old quote, "you don't need to know the information, just where to find it" and when it comes to your computer that is never more true than today. We have local apps, web apps, cloud data, websites information all over the place.

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SSH, its not just for remote terminal sessions.

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Linux

Over the past few weeks, it really has struck me just how much you can do with SSH, this is because ssh is not a command as such it is a suite of tools. In reality the suite is most useful when copying files over the internet as your providing an encrypted tunnel to work in, however using it internally is not such a bad thing either. These are just a few of the functions you can use the SSH to perform.

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Ubuntu, we all should thank you, however its time to move on..

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Linux

There are a lot of reasons why Ubuntu has become the byword for Linux over the last few years. It had a promise, a simple one really "Linux for Human beings" and as an Operating system Ubuntu has more than delivered on that promise.

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Why i'm just about ready to trade in my iPad for an Android Tablet

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Just talk

I've been an iPad user from Day one, however I'm starting to feel that while the Apple Tablet has a future and no one can argue that. I'm looking to migrate to an Android Device.

Find Out Why

Sonic the Hedgehog went OpenSource?

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Just talk

Turns out that there is an Open source version of Sonic the Hedgehog and its available on Linux.. (and Windows) I'm really now sure how this is available, if Sega Opened the code? However it's here and it plays quite well...

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Items to put in a laptop bag to make travel easier

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Just talk

This post is more than a little inspired by a Lifehacker Post where they cover a similar idea.. Got me to thinking, What bag do i use, and what do i put in it for tech stuff when travelling. I'll state right now this drives my wife nuts. However I only take one pair of shoes and half the clothes she doesw ith me, so i guess it evens out.. Wink

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How do i get a nested virtual environment working?

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Linux

If you have ever had the need to get a nested virtual environment working, so virtualbox running inside vmware, I've put some instructions together un an ubuntu1110 server on my blog.

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Where did eth0 go after migrating my VMware Ubuntu machine?

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Linux

If you've every had to migrate a Linux machine in VMware or Virtualbox, you'll probably have noticed that the eth0 either disappears or changes to eth1 I've put up on my blog why this happens, and how to solve the problem.

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My 20 Most Used Android Apps.

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Just talk

It seems almost obligatory to do some form of App List and as such these are my personally most used Apps on my Android Mobile.

Read More: http://me.hippofield.com/2011/10/my-20-most-used-android-apps.html

Ubuntu 11.10 - Take 2

Filed under
Linux

Back in October i wrote what was described as a scathing post about the lack of innovation coming out of Canonical.

The complete lack of innovation part i feel stands. However I have had a chance to play with the Unity Interface and I'm getting accustomed to it.

It seems the move toward a more OSX looking system is very obvious especially when the background is changed and the borders are changed to a lighter colour.

Read More: http://me.hippofield.com/2011/11/ubuntu-1110-take-2.html

Pinguy OS - A Fully loaded Ubuntu respin which should suit new Linux users..

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Linux

It's not without surprise that Ubuntu is not without its faults, one of them is, from a new users perspective it's a Distro which does need a lot to setup to get it functional. What Pinguy Tries to do is provide a better Out of the Box experience..

Read More: me.hippofield.com

Linux is far from dead on the desktop, but it is time to start again..

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Linux

Linux is an important OS, has a long history, and serves many people well, which is why it is time to kill it and end this game...

These are not the ramblings of a lunatic looking to start a flame war.. This is the reality in todays dog eat dog world.

Read More: http://me.hippofield.com/2011/10/linux-is-far-from-dead-on-desktop-but.html

2011 - Has Internet TV really moved forward, can you really cut the cable?

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Just talk

Back in 2008 I wrote a blog post about the state of Internet TV at the time, which was fairly well received. nearly 4 years on its time to re-assess the state of Internet TV.

Since 2008 when Internet based TV was really just starting the landscape has really changed, gone in a large proportion of the examples I gave they were very much Windows focussed. However the device landscape itself has changed hugely since 2008. Mainly due to the iPad and Android platforms, what is available has become platform agnostic, which has made the whole concept of cutting the cable and going internet only far easier.

As a Linux user is this easier or harder than it was in 2008?

Read More:
http://me.hippofield.com/2011/10/2011-has-internet-tv-really-moved.html

Zentyal Linux, a usable Linux Server

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Linux

I've flip flopped over the years between many linux distros for Servers, from CentOS and Ubuntu following the great guides at Howtoforge while learning how different things work. Now however i'm looking for quick and easy solutions to problems.

6 Linux as a Service Distros you should know about..

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Linux

There are many Linux Distros out there, covering all manner of reasons for having them, what i've put together here is my list of the 6 Most useful Linux Distros I actually use regularly. I'm not looking at Linux Desktop's here, these are LaaS Linux as a Service Distros each one providing a certain type of functionality and should be kept in any half decent tech's Knowledge Base.

http://me.hippofield.com/2011/10/6-linux-as-service-distros-you-should.html

Howto: Building a Cheap Nettop Media PC

The origin of this project was an article on Lifehacker, however, i've expanded on it, and can point you in the way of actually getting this working. because i found the lifehacker article a good stating point for what I wanted, but left me short of sound and other items.

Thoughts: Where is Linux Going?

Filed under
Just talk

My first ventures into Linux were way back in 1995 with a copy of Red Hat, and i'll put my hands up, i just didn't get it, command line, when Windows had a GUI, nothing seemed to work, and a strange command set, but even back then, not understanding Linux, and wondering what the fuss was about, i will say, i was very aware of what this ment to the industry, and knew it was important.

XBMC

Filed under
Reviews

Streaming media around the home, is something which is becoming a more commercial viability, if you look at the amount of hardware available for the Task, the Big Boys, Buffalo, Dlink, LinkSys, Freecom and NetGear all have Network Media extenders which attach to your network, and TV, and allow you to stream music and video off a NAS Server or computer to your TV.

Slowly moving people to Linux via OpenSource Apps

Filed under
Linux

The migration to Linux, is though Open Source applications, on Windows, creating a comfort zone, a feeling of familiar desktop apps, something which isn't alien, when you make the transition to the Linux Desktop.

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More in Tux Machines

NanoPi NEO3 Headless SBC Launched for $20 and up

Last month, we found out FriendlyELEC was working on NanoPi NEO3, a tiny SBC powered by Rockchip RK3328 processor and made for headless applications and networked storage thanks to Gigabit Ethernet and USB 3.0 ports, as well as a 26-pin GPIO header. At the time, the board was still been finalized, but the company has now started to take orders for $20 and up depending on options which include a cute white enclosure... [...] The Wiki has been updated as well, and the company provides both Ubuntu Core 18.04 based FriendlyCore, and OpenWrt based FriendlyWrt operating systems for the board with both relying on Linux 5.4.12 kernel. I’d also expect Armbian to eventually provide Ubuntu 20.04 and Debian 10 images. Read more

Moving (parts of) the Cling REPL in Clang

Motivation
===

Over the last decade we have developed an interactive, interpretative 
C++ (aka REPL) as part of the high-energy physics (HEP) data analysis 
project -- ROOT [1-2]. We invested a significant  effort to replace the 
CINT C++ interpreter with a newly implemented REPL based on llvm -- 
cling [3]. The cling infrastructure is a core component of the data 
analysis framework of ROOT and runs in production for approximately 5 
years.

Cling is also  a standalone tool, which has a growing community outside 
of our field. Cling’s user community includes users in finance, biology 
and in a few companies with proprietary software. For example, there is 
a xeus-cling jupyter kernel [4]. One of the major challenges we face to 
foster that community is  our cling-related patches in llvm and clang 
forks. The benefits of using the LLVM community standards for code 
reviews, release cycles and integration has been mentioned a number of 
times by our "external" users.

Last year we were awarded an NSF grant to improve cling's sustainability 
and make it a standalone tool. We thank the LLVM Foundation Board for 
supporting us with a non-binding letter of collaboration which was 
essential for getting this grant.


Background
===

Cling is a C++ interpreter built on top of clang and llvm. In a 
nutshell, it uses clang's incremental compilation facilities to process 
code chunk-by-chunk by assuming an ever-growing translation unit [5]. 
Then code is lowered into llvm IR and run by the llvm jit. Cling has 
implemented some language "extensions" such as execution statements on 
the global scope and error recovery. Cling is in the core of HEP -- it 
is heavily used during data analysis of exabytes of particle physics 
data coming from the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and other particle 
physics experiments.


Plans
===

The project foresees three main directions -- move parts of cling 
upstream along with the clang and llvm features that enable them; extend 
and generalize the language interoperability layer around cling; and 
extend and generalize the OpenCL/CUDA support in cling. We are at the 
early stages of the project and this email intends to be an RFC for the 
first part -- upstreaming parts of cling. Please do share your thoughts 
on the rest, too.


Moving Parts of Cling Upstream
---

Over the years we have slowly moved some patches upstream. However we 
still have around 100 patches in the clang fork. Most of them are in the 
context of extending the incremental compilation support for clang. The 
incremental compilation poses some challenges in the clang 
infrastructure. For example, we need to tune CodeGen to work with 
multiple llvm::Module instances, and finalize per each 
end-of-translation unit (we have multiple of them). Other changes 
include small adjustments in the FileManager's caching mechanism, and 
bug fixes in the SourceManager (code which can be reached mostly from 
within our setup). One conclusion we can draw from our research is that 
the clang infrastructure fits amazingly well to something which was not 
its main use case. The grand total of our diffs against clang-9 is: `62 
files changed, 1294 insertions(+), 231 deletions(-)`. Cling is currently 
being upgraded from llvm-5 to llvm-9.

A major weakness of cling's infrastructure is that it does not work with 
the clang Action infrastructure due to the lack of an 
IncrementalAction.  A possible way forward would be to implement a 
clang::IncrementalAction as a starting point. This way we should be able 
to reduce the amount of setup necessary to use the incremental 
infrastructure in clang. However, this will be a bit of a testing 
challenge -- cling lives downstream and some of the new code may be 
impossible to pick straight away and use. Building a mainline example 
tool such as clang-repl which gives us a way to test that incremental 
case or repurpose the already existing clang-interpreter may  be able to 
address the issue. The major risk of the task is avoiding code in the 
clang mainline which is untested by its HEP production environment.
There are several other types of patches to the ROOT fork of Clang, 
including ones  in the context of performance,towards  C++ modules 
support (D41416), and storage (does not have a patch yet but has an open 
projects entry and somebody working on it). These patches can be 
considered in parallel independently on the rest.

Extend and Generalize the Language Interoperability Layer Around Cling
---

HEP has extensive experience with on-demand python interoperability 
using cppyy[6], which is built around the type information provided by 
cling. Unlike tools with custom parsers such as swig and sip and tools 
built on top of C-APIs such as boost.python and pybind11, cling can 
provide information about memory management patterns (eg refcounting) 
and instantiate templates on the fly.We feel that functionality may not 
be of general interest to the llvm community but we will prepare another 
RFC and send it here later on to gather feedback.


Extend and Generalize the OpenCL/CUDA Support in Cling
---

Cling can incrementally compile CUDA code [7-8] allowing easier set up 
and enabling some interesting use cases. There are a number of planned 
improvements including talking to HIP [9] and SYCL to support more 
hardware architectures.



The primary focus of our work is to upstreaming functionality required 
to build an incremental compiler and rework cling build against vanilla 
clang and llvm. The last two points are to give the scope of the work 
which we will be doing the next 2-3 years. We will send here RFCs for 
both of them to trigger technical discussion if there is interest in 
pursuing this direction.


Collaboration
===

Open source development nowadays relies on reviewers. LLVM is no 
different and we will probably disturb a good number of people in the 
community ;)We would like to invite anybody interested in joining our 
incremental C++ activities to our open every second week calls. 
Announcements will be done via google group: compiler-research-announce 
(https://groups.google.com/g/compiler-research-announce).



Many thanks!


David & Vassil

Read more Also: Cling C++ Interpreter Looking To Upstream More Code Into LLVM

This week in KDE: New features galore!

Tons and tons of awesome new features and UI polish landed this week, alongside an equally weighty ton of important bugfixes. Read more

Elive 3.8.14 beta released

The Elive Team is proud to announce the release of the beta version 3.8.14 This new version includes: Kernel updated to 5.6.14 retrowave special theme themes, designs, icons improvements and more customizations included bootup with a much more friendly graphical menu, it now remembers your last selected OS, all the options are in the same menu instead of submenus, disabled useless recovery options, improved resolution, fixed wallpaper issue on encrypted installations SWAP space is much more performant now, feedbacks welcome Read more