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finid's blog

How to custmize KDE’s window titlebar buttons

Filed under
Linux

If you are using the latest KDE edition of your favorite distribution, your window titlebar could be missing a button or two that you most certainly need. That is definitely the case on Sabayon 9 KDE. The titlebar could also be sporting spacers that you do not need, as is the case on Kubuntu 12.04.

KLook gets PDF/ODT support, while StackFolder gets drag-n-drop

Filed under
Linux

KLook is a multi-file-type viewer. It is not an application that can be started standalone, but is integrated into other applications, like Dolphin, KDE’s file manager. StackFolder, on the other hand, is a widget application that makes it possible to browse the contents of a directory, or your entire home folder, without opening Dolphin.

Downloads of Apache OpenOffice 3.4.0 top 5 million

If you just dropped in from outer space, Apache OpenOffice, or what used to be called OpenOffice.org, was a Sun Microsystems-sponsored project. It was at one time, the most popular office suite, as it was pre-installed on almost all Linux and BSD desktop distributions.

Read the complete article at http://www.linuxbsdos.com/2012/06/20/downloads-of-apache-openoffice-3-4-0-top-5-million/

How to make Fedora 17 more user-friendly with easyLife

Filed under
Linux

But there are applications that make it very easy to install most non-free applications on any edition of Fedora. One of those applications is called EasyLife. This article shows the simple steps you need to install it on your Fedora 17-powered box.

Read the complete article at http://www.linuxbsdos.com/2012/06/20/how-to-make-fedora-17-more-user-friendly-with-easylife/

Zorin OS 6 Core preview

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Linux

Zorin OS is one of those distributions that attempt to bring something different to the Linux desktop. But what exactly does Zorin OS bring to the table? An Ubuntu-based distribution with a Microsoft Windows 7 theme. The objective is to make it easier for Windows users to switch to Linux.

Read the complete article at http://www.linuxbsdos.com/2012/06/20/zorin-os-6-core-preview/

Mandriva 2012 technical preview

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Linux

The installer in this technical preview gives you the option to install a KDE desktop (default), a GNOME 3 desktop, LXDE and Other desktop. I hoped to show screen shots from test installations of supported desktop environments, but the GNOME 3 installation was too buggy to use. As a result, only screen shots from the KDE, LXDE and Other desktops are featured.

Fedora 17 KDE review

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Linux

For the main edition and for each Spin, there are installation images for 32- and 64-bit architectures. This article presents a review of the KDE Spin, using a 32-bit installation image on real hardware and in a virtual environment.

Read the complete article at http://www.linuxbsdos.com

Sabayon 9 KDE and GNOME preview

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Linux

Sabayon is a rolling-release distribution, so existing users do not have to reinstall to get the latest core and applications of a Sabayon release. That is one of the best features of the distribution.

Read the complete article at http://www.linuxbsdos.com/2012/06/12/sabayon-9-kde-and-gnome-preview/

Linux Mint 13 MATE/Cinnamon review

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Linux

Both desktop environments aim to satisfy users who refuse to let go of old technology and those who demand new technology, but packaged in a familiar format. And Linux Mint is the first project to make both available to users in separate ISO installation images for 32- and 64-bit architectures.

This article is a review of both editions.

How to dual-boot Linux Mint 13 Cinnamon/MATE and Windows 7

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Linux

This tutorial presents a step-by-step guide on how to dual-boot either one with Windows 7 on a computer with a single hard drive. Because the Cinnamon and MATE editions of Linux Mint 13 share the same installation program, the steps involved are the same regardless of the edition you use.

2 cool features to expect in KDE 4.9

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Linux

The list of planned features is very long and includes many UX and UI additions, improvements and bugfixes, but the two that I am looking forward to the most are KLook and StackFolder, two features already available by default on ROSA Marathon 2012 and also in ROSA Desktop 2012 beta.

How to change the height and position of the KDE panel

Filed under
Linux

To change the properties of the panel, which by default is on the bottom edge of the desktop, you need to access the Panel Tool Box widget located on the extreme right edge of the panel. Depending on the distribution you are using, the panel could be locked or unlocked.

Read the complete article at http://www.linuxbsdos.com/2012/06/05/how-to-change-the-height-and-position-of-the-kde-panel/

Mageia 2 review

Filed under
Linux

The other desktop environments and window managers supported by Mageia 2 are E17, LXDE, WindowMaker and IceWM. Aside from the Live CD installation images for KDE and GNOME 3, users are offered dual-architecture CD installation images, DVD, and network-based CD ISO installation images for 32- and 64-bit architectures.

MATE vs Cinnamon

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Linux

The aim of this article is not to present a point-by-point comparison of the two desktop environments, but to present a general overview, so a new user has a top-level idea of what they are.

Piwik 1.8 released

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News

It is an alternative to Google Analytics and from my experience, better in many respects. The latest version, released just today June 1 2012, is Piwik 1.8, and it comes with its share of new and improved features and bugfixes.

This release is rated critical, so if you are running Piwik 1.7.1, the previous stable version, immediate upgrade is highly recommended.

Install Cinnamon 1.4 on Fedora 17

Filed under
Linux

For those set of users, suitable alternatives are: Modify the interface with extensions, as I showed how to do here, or install Cinnamon desktop, a project from the developers of Linux Mint. Cinnamon appeals to many because it offers the familiar look and feel of the type of desktop environment they are used to.

Fedora 17 KDE and GNOME 3 preview

Filed under
Linux

Specialized Spins for Security, Scientific-KDE, Design-suite, SoaS, Games, Electronic-lab and Robotics were also released. It is very unlikely that I will review these, but there will be reviews of the main edition and KDE Spin. While the reviews are still being baked, here are a few screen shots from test installations of the main edition and KDE Spin for your viewing pleasure.

How to get back that friendly desktop look on Mageia 2 GNOME 3

Filed under
Linux

From my perspective, the worst culprit is GNOME 3. And though I have often criticised the default GNOME 3 interface, with a little bit of tweaking here and there, I have been able to get it to a point where I can actually use it for my daily computing tasks. It is not perfect, but much better than the default configuration.

Panel-Docklet: A must-install extension for GNOME 3

Consequently, I have not even bothered to install a distribution running GNOME 3 in its default state on a “production” boxen, other than for review purposes only. But while preparing a review of Mageia 2, I came across an extension that could just make me a believer and user of GNOME 3.

Read the full article at

Linux Mint 13 MATE/Cinnamon preview

Filed under
Linux

There is Linux Mint 13 MATE, which features MATE, a desktop environment forked from GNOME 2, and Linux Mint 13 Cinnamon, which features Cinnamon, a desktop environment built atop GNOME 3. So, Linux Mint joins a growing list of Linux distributions that do not ship an edition running the GNOME 3 desktop in its default state.

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More in Tux Machines

Kernel: Millennium Prize, Compute Express Link 2.0, HP Platform Profile Support

  • Millennium prize problems but for Linux

    There is a longstanding tradition in mathematics to create a list of hard unsolved problems to drive people to work on solving them. Examples include Hilbert's problems and the Millennium Prize problems. Wouldn't it be nice if we had the same for Linux? A bunch of hard problems with sexy names that would drive development forward? Sadly there is no easy source for tens of millions of euros in prize money, not to mention it would be very hard to distribute as this work would, by necessity, be spread over a large group of people. Thus it seems is unlikely for this to work in practice, but that does not prevent us from stealing a different trick from mathematicians' toolbox and ponder how it would work in theory. In this case the list of problems will probably never exist, but let's assume that it does. What would it contain if it did exist? Here's one example I came up with. it is left as an exercise to the reader to work out what prompted me to write this post. [...] A knee-jerk reaction many people have is something along the lines of "you can solve this by limiting the number of linker processes by doing X". That is not the answer. It solves the symptoms but not the underlying cause, which is that bad input causes the scheduler to do the wrong thing. There are many other ways of triggering the same issue, for example by copying large files around. A proper solution would fix all of those in one go.

  • Compute Express Link 2.0 Support Sent In For Linux 5.12, Enabling CXL 2.0 Memory Devices - Phoronix

    Immediately following the publishing of the Linux enablement patches for CXL 2.0 and that continued in the months since over several rounds of patches. That initial CXL 2.0 code is now slated for mainlining with the Linux 5.12 kernel. The initial Compute Express Link 2.0 focus for the Linux kernel has been on supporting Type-3 Memory Devices. The CXL 2.0 type-3 memory device support being fleshed out first is for serving as a memory expander for RAM or persistent memory and can optionally be interleaved with other CXL devices. For the lack of any CXL 2.0 hardware yet even within the confines of Intel, Widawsky worked out this initial enablement code thanks to writing up support around the specification within QEMU for emulation.

  • Linux 5.13 Should See HP Platform Profile Support - Phoronix

    Linux 5.12 is bringing the initial infrastructure around ACPI Platform Profile support and with this kernel it's implemented for newer Lenovo ThinkPad and IdeaPad laptops. The support allow for altering the system's power/performance characteristics depending upon your desire for a speedy, quiet, or cool experience. With Linux 5.13 it looks like HP laptops with this capability will begin to see working Platform Profile support too. Lenovo is the initial Linux user/supporter of this Platform Profile support while Dell has also expressed interest in supporting it on Linux for letting users manipulate their desire desired balance of performance vs. cool/quiet operation. There has been an HP patch implementing the support and it's looking like that is now ready to be queued into the x86 platform driver tree once the current Linux 5.12 merge window is over, which would mark it as material for 5.13.

Open Source Community Critical Of Chessbase, Fat Fritz 2

The development teams behind the two most successful and influential open-source chess programs, Stockfish and Leela Chess Zero, have issued statements denouncing the commercial program Fat Fritz 2 and the company Chessbase that is selling the program for 99,90 euros. The statements (Stockfish blog, lichess announcement) assert that the engine in Fat Fritz 2 is Stockfish with minimal changes, that Fat Fritz 2 has violated the GNU General Public License under which Stockfish is released, and that Chessbase's marketing has made false claims about Fat Fritz 2's playing strength. Read more

Videos/Audiocasts/Shows: Password Managers, Rust, and Laptops as Servers

  • Password Managers: A Tool Everybody Deserves - YouTube

    Lastpass was in the news recently and it made me realize how few people use a password manager, regardless of whether you prefer an offline or online solution not using a password manager leads to bad habits and much weaker passwords.

  • FLOSS Weekly 618: Rust - Steve Klabnik & Rust

    Steve Klabnik joins Doc Searls and Shawn Powers to talk about Rust. Rust, which was started at Mozilla, has grown to become one of the world's most relied-upon and fastest growing programming languages. Klabnik literally wrote the book on Rust. In the show, he visits how it differs from C++ and other alternatives, some of the many ways it is used, the large and familiar names (e.g. DropBox) that depend on it, the community culture around it, how open source and free software work are changing as we move toward a post-COVID world.

  • How to Homelab - Laptops as Servers?!

    In the latest episode of "How to Homelab", we take a look at the concept of using laptops as servers, and I give you my thoughts. It might just be a crazy enough idea to work!

Mozilla Leftovers

  • Firefox 86 brings multiple Picture-in-Picture, “Total Cookie Protection”

    In December 2019, Firefox introduced Picture-in-Picture mode—an additional overlay control on in-browser embedded videos that allows the user to detach the video from the browser. Once detached, the video has no window dressing whatsoever—no title bar, min/max/close, etc. PiP mode allows users who tile their windows—automatically or manually—to watch said video while consuming a bare minimum of screen real estate. Firefox 86 introduces the concept of multiple simultaneous Picture-in-Picture instances. Prior to build 86, hitting the PiP control on a second video would simply reattach the first video to its parent tab and detach the second. Now, you can have as many floating, detached video windows as you'd like—potentially turning any monitor into something reminiscent of a security DVR display. The key thing to realize about multi-PiP is that the parent tabs must remain open—if you navigate away from the parent tab of an existing PiP window, the PiP window itself closes as well. Once I realized this, I had no difficulty surrounding my Firefox 86 window with five detached, simultaneously playing video windows.

  • This Week in Glean: Boring Monitoring [Ed: Mozilla insists that it is not surveillance when they call it "data science" and "big data"]

    Every Monday the Glean has its weekly Glean SDK meeting. This meeting is used for 2 main parts: First discussing the features and bugs the team is currently investigating or that were requested by outside stakeholders. And second bug triage & monitoring of data that Glean reports in the wild. [...] It probably can! But it requires more work than throwing together a dashboard with graphs. It’s also not as easy to define thresholds on these changes and when to report them. There’s work underway that hopefully enables us to more quickly build up these dashboards for any product using the Glean SDK, which we can then also extend to do more reporting automated. The final goal should be that the product teams themselves are responsible for monitoring their data.

  • William Lachance: Community @ Mozilla: People First, Open Source Second [Ed: Is this why Mozilla pays its CEO over 3 million dollars per year (quadruple the older sum) while sacking even its own people and spying on Firefox users (people)?]

    It seems ridiculously naive in retrospect, but I can remember thinking at the time that the right amount of “open source” would solve all the problems. What can I say? It was the era of the Arab Spring, WikiLeaks had not yet become a scandal, Google still felt like something of a benevolent upstart, even Facebook’s mission of “making the world more connected” sounded great to me at the time. If we could just push more things out in the open, then the right solutions would become apparent and fixing the structural problems society was facing would become easy! What a difference a decade makes. The events of the last few years have demonstrated (conclusively, in my view) that open systems aren’t necessarily a protector against abuse by governments, technology monopolies and ill-intentioned groups of individuals alike. Amazon, Google and Facebook are (still) some of the top contributors to key pieces of open source infrastructure but it’s now beyond any doubt that they’re also responsible for amplifying a very large share of the problems global society is experiencing.