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finid's blog

How to custmize KDE’s window titlebar buttons

Filed under
Linux

If you are using the latest KDE edition of your favorite distribution, your window titlebar could be missing a button or two that you most certainly need. That is definitely the case on Sabayon 9 KDE. The titlebar could also be sporting spacers that you do not need, as is the case on Kubuntu 12.04.

KLook gets PDF/ODT support, while StackFolder gets drag-n-drop

Filed under
Linux

KLook is a multi-file-type viewer. It is not an application that can be started standalone, but is integrated into other applications, like Dolphin, KDE’s file manager. StackFolder, on the other hand, is a widget application that makes it possible to browse the contents of a directory, or your entire home folder, without opening Dolphin.

Downloads of Apache OpenOffice 3.4.0 top 5 million

If you just dropped in from outer space, Apache OpenOffice, or what used to be called OpenOffice.org, was a Sun Microsystems-sponsored project. It was at one time, the most popular office suite, as it was pre-installed on almost all Linux and BSD desktop distributions.

Read the complete article at http://www.linuxbsdos.com/2012/06/20/downloads-of-apache-openoffice-3-4-0-top-5-million/

How to make Fedora 17 more user-friendly with easyLife

Filed under
Linux

But there are applications that make it very easy to install most non-free applications on any edition of Fedora. One of those applications is called EasyLife. This article shows the simple steps you need to install it on your Fedora 17-powered box.

Read the complete article at http://www.linuxbsdos.com/2012/06/20/how-to-make-fedora-17-more-user-friendly-with-easylife/

Zorin OS 6 Core preview

Filed under
Linux

Zorin OS is one of those distributions that attempt to bring something different to the Linux desktop. But what exactly does Zorin OS bring to the table? An Ubuntu-based distribution with a Microsoft Windows 7 theme. The objective is to make it easier for Windows users to switch to Linux.

Read the complete article at http://www.linuxbsdos.com/2012/06/20/zorin-os-6-core-preview/

Mandriva 2012 technical preview

Filed under
Linux

The installer in this technical preview gives you the option to install a KDE desktop (default), a GNOME 3 desktop, LXDE and Other desktop. I hoped to show screen shots from test installations of supported desktop environments, but the GNOME 3 installation was too buggy to use. As a result, only screen shots from the KDE, LXDE and Other desktops are featured.

Fedora 17 KDE review

Filed under
Linux

For the main edition and for each Spin, there are installation images for 32- and 64-bit architectures. This article presents a review of the KDE Spin, using a 32-bit installation image on real hardware and in a virtual environment.

Read the complete article at http://www.linuxbsdos.com

Sabayon 9 KDE and GNOME preview

Filed under
Linux

Sabayon is a rolling-release distribution, so existing users do not have to reinstall to get the latest core and applications of a Sabayon release. That is one of the best features of the distribution.

Read the complete article at http://www.linuxbsdos.com/2012/06/12/sabayon-9-kde-and-gnome-preview/

Linux Mint 13 MATE/Cinnamon review

Filed under
Linux

Both desktop environments aim to satisfy users who refuse to let go of old technology and those who demand new technology, but packaged in a familiar format. And Linux Mint is the first project to make both available to users in separate ISO installation images for 32- and 64-bit architectures.

This article is a review of both editions.

How to dual-boot Linux Mint 13 Cinnamon/MATE and Windows 7

Filed under
Linux

This tutorial presents a step-by-step guide on how to dual-boot either one with Windows 7 on a computer with a single hard drive. Because the Cinnamon and MATE editions of Linux Mint 13 share the same installation program, the steps involved are the same regardless of the edition you use.

2 cool features to expect in KDE 4.9

Filed under
Linux

The list of planned features is very long and includes many UX and UI additions, improvements and bugfixes, but the two that I am looking forward to the most are KLook and StackFolder, two features already available by default on ROSA Marathon 2012 and also in ROSA Desktop 2012 beta.

How to change the height and position of the KDE panel

Filed under
Linux

To change the properties of the panel, which by default is on the bottom edge of the desktop, you need to access the Panel Tool Box widget located on the extreme right edge of the panel. Depending on the distribution you are using, the panel could be locked or unlocked.

Read the complete article at http://www.linuxbsdos.com/2012/06/05/how-to-change-the-height-and-position-of-the-kde-panel/

Mageia 2 review

Filed under
Linux

The other desktop environments and window managers supported by Mageia 2 are E17, LXDE, WindowMaker and IceWM. Aside from the Live CD installation images for KDE and GNOME 3, users are offered dual-architecture CD installation images, DVD, and network-based CD ISO installation images for 32- and 64-bit architectures.

MATE vs Cinnamon

Filed under
Linux

The aim of this article is not to present a point-by-point comparison of the two desktop environments, but to present a general overview, so a new user has a top-level idea of what they are.

Piwik 1.8 released

Filed under
News

It is an alternative to Google Analytics and from my experience, better in many respects. The latest version, released just today June 1 2012, is Piwik 1.8, and it comes with its share of new and improved features and bugfixes.

This release is rated critical, so if you are running Piwik 1.7.1, the previous stable version, immediate upgrade is highly recommended.

Install Cinnamon 1.4 on Fedora 17

Filed under
Linux

For those set of users, suitable alternatives are: Modify the interface with extensions, as I showed how to do here, or install Cinnamon desktop, a project from the developers of Linux Mint. Cinnamon appeals to many because it offers the familiar look and feel of the type of desktop environment they are used to.

Fedora 17 KDE and GNOME 3 preview

Filed under
Linux

Specialized Spins for Security, Scientific-KDE, Design-suite, SoaS, Games, Electronic-lab and Robotics were also released. It is very unlikely that I will review these, but there will be reviews of the main edition and KDE Spin. While the reviews are still being baked, here are a few screen shots from test installations of the main edition and KDE Spin for your viewing pleasure.

How to get back that friendly desktop look on Mageia 2 GNOME 3

Filed under
Linux

From my perspective, the worst culprit is GNOME 3. And though I have often criticised the default GNOME 3 interface, with a little bit of tweaking here and there, I have been able to get it to a point where I can actually use it for my daily computing tasks. It is not perfect, but much better than the default configuration.

Panel-Docklet: A must-install extension for GNOME 3

Consequently, I have not even bothered to install a distribution running GNOME 3 in its default state on a “production” boxen, other than for review purposes only. But while preparing a review of Mageia 2, I came across an extension that could just make me a believer and user of GNOME 3.

Read the full article at

Linux Mint 13 MATE/Cinnamon preview

Filed under
Linux

There is Linux Mint 13 MATE, which features MATE, a desktop environment forked from GNOME 2, and Linux Mint 13 Cinnamon, which features Cinnamon, a desktop environment built atop GNOME 3. So, Linux Mint joins a growing list of Linux distributions that do not ship an edition running the GNOME 3 desktop in its default state.

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Programming: Node.js, Micro:bit, L4Re, Python, Go and More

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    Node.js is used to build fast, highly scalable network applications based on an event-driven non-blocking input/output model, single-threaded asynchronous programming. A web application framework is a combination of libraries, helpers, and tools that provide a way to effortlessly build and run web applications. A web framework lays out a foundation for building a web site/app. The most important aspects of a web framework are – its architecture and features (such as support for customization, flexibility, extensibility, security, compatibility with other libraries, etc..).
  • Debian now got everything you need to program Micro:bit
    I am amazed and very pleased to discover that since a few days ago, everything you need to program the BBC micro:bit is available from the Debian archive. All this is thanks to the hard work of Nick Morrott and the Debian python packaging team. The micro:bit project recommend the mu-editor to program the microcomputer, as this editor will take care of all the machinery required to injekt/flash micropython alongside the program into the micro:bit, as long as the pieces are available. There are three main pieces involved. The first to enter Debian was python-uflash, which was accepted into the archive 2019-01-12. The next one was mu-editor, which showed up 2019-01-13. The final and hardest part to to into the archive was firmware-microbit-micropython, which needed to get its build system and dependencies into Debian before it was accepted 2019-01-20. The last one is already in Debian Unstable and should enter Debian Testing / Buster in three days. This all allow any user of the micro:bit to get going by simply running 'apt install mu-editor' when using Testing or Unstable, and once Buster is released as stable, all the users of Debian stable will be catered for.
  • Some Ideas for 2019
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  • 5 Best Python IDEs You Can Get in 2019
    If you’re taking Python lessons online, you will eventually need a good IDE (Integrated Development Environment) to write better code. The command line interface can only prove so useful. At Python.com you can download a native IDE called IDLE (Integrated Development and Learning Environment). However, it is rather basic in scope, and debugging can consume more time than necessary. With this in mind, here are a few of the best IDEs for Python which add to your productivity.
  • Python’s Requests Library (Guide)
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  • PyCoder’s Weekly: Issue #352 (Jan. 22, 2019)
  • Why Don't People Use Formal Methods?

    Before we begin, we need to lay down some terms. There really isn’t a formal methods community so much as a few tiny bands foraging in the Steppe.1 This means different groups use terms in different ways. Very broadly, there are two domains in FM: formal specification is the study of how we write precise, unambiguous specifications, and formal verification is the study of how we prove things are correct. But “things” includes both code and abstract systems. Not only do we use separate means of specifying both things, we often use different means to verify them, too. To make things even more confusing, if somebody says they do formal specification, they usually mean they both specify and verify systems, and if somebody says they do formal verification, they usually mean mean they both specify and verify code.

    Before we begin, we need to lay down some terms. There really isn’t a formal methods community so much as a few tiny bands foraging in the Steppe.1 This means different groups use terms in different ways. Very broadly, there are two domains in FM: formal specification is the study of how we write precise, unambiguous specifications, and formal verification is the study of how we prove things are correct. But “things” includes both code and abstract systems. Not only do we use separate means of specifying both things, we often use different means to verify them, too. To make things even more confusing, if somebody says they do formal specification, they usually mean they both specify and verify systems, and if somebody says they do formal verification, they usually mean mean they both specify and verify code. For clarity purposes, I will divide verification into code verification (CV) and design verification (DV), and similarly divide specification into CS and DS. These are not terms used in the wider FM world. We’ll start by talking about CS and CV, then move on to DS and DV.

  • Learning C as an uneducated hobbyist

    V=Programming, however, is conscious. It’s an activity in which you have to think in order to act. Unlearning bad practice in programming takes no energy at all apart from that spent being told that the practice is bad and coming to understand and remember it. Once you’ve done that, it’s almost impossible to make the same mistake again.

    That’s why you shouldn’t be afraid of learning “along the way”, “as you go” or “in an ad-hoc manner” because “you might learn bad practice”. If you learn the wrong thing, you can learn the right thing later. After all, you’re not a professional programmer. It doesn’t matter very much if you make a mistake; your job doesn’t depend on it.

  • Demystifying Pointers in Go
    If you’ve never worked with a language that exposes pointers, it could be a little confusing. But the good news is pointers don’t need to be scary. In fact, pointers can be pretty straightforward. Here are the basics of pointers in Go:

GNOME 3.32 Desktop Environment to Launch with a "Radical New Icon Style"

Besides the slightly revamped default theme, it looks like the GNOME 3.32 desktop environment will come with a "radical new icon style," along with new guidelines for app developers to provide a more unified icon style across the GNOME ecosystem. GNOME designer Jakub Steiner writes in his latest blog article about the improvements needed for the revamped icon style to be included by default with the GNOME 3.32 release of the open-source desktop environment used by numerous Linux-based operating systems, including Ubuntu. Read more Also: GNOME Is Making Great Progress On Overhauling Their App Icons

Dell XPS 13 9380 Developer Edition Now Available, Shipping With Ubuntu 18.04 LTS

Dell is now shipping their new XPS 13 8th gen (9380) laptop in a developer edition that comes preloaded with Ubuntu 18.04 LTS. The Dell XPS 9380 is only an incremental upgrade over the previous-generation 9370: it has the slightly newer Intel Whiskey Lake processors, moves the web camera position to the top of the display rather than at the bottom, and other minor refinements but nothing too dramatic. From the Developer Edition side, they have moved from Ubuntu 16.04 LTS to 18.04 LTS. Read more Also: The new Dell XPS 13 developer edition now available in the US, Europe and Canada New Dell XPS 13 Laptop with Ubuntu Is Now Available in the US, Europe and Canada

Microsoft Windows Server Benchmarked Against Six Linux Distributions

While it was not too long ago that Microsoft Windows Server 2019 began shipping and that we conducted some end-of-year benchmarks between Windows and Linux, with being in the process of running a number of Windows and Linux benchmarks as part of our ongoing 10GbE OS performance testing, I also took the opportunity to run some other benchmarks on Windows Server 2016 and 2019 as well as a set of Linux distributions. With carrying out the fresh OS installations anyways for the network testing, with recently having brought over some more Phoronix Test Suite test profiles with Windows support, I decided to run some fresh Windows Server vs. Linux benchmarks anyways. Granted, not all of the tests are server-oriented and not all of the traditional Linux server distributions were used. Just take this as you wish of some fresh Windows vs. Linux performance benchmarks. Read more