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Operating Systems in Tux Machines

Filed under
Site News

Summary: Some numbers to show what goes on in sites that do not share information about their visitors (unlike Windows-centric sites which target non-technical audiences)

THE common perception of GNU/Linux is that it is scarcely used, based on statistics gathered from privacy-hostile Web sites that share (or sell) access log data, embed spyware in all of their pages, and so on. Our sites are inherently different because of a reasonable -- if not sometimes fanatic -- appreciation of privacy at both ends (server and client). People who read technical sites know how to block ads, impede spurious scripts etc. These sites also actively avoid anything which is privacy-infringing, such as interactive 'social' media buttons (these let third parties spy on all visitors in all pages).

Techrights and Tux Machines attract the lion's share our traffic (and server capacity). They both have dedicated servers. These are truly popular and some of the leaders in their respective areas. Techrights deals with threats to software freedom, whereas Tux Machines is about real-time news discovery and organisation (pertaining to Free software and GNU/Linux).

The Varnish layer, which protects both of these large sites (nearly 100,000 pages in each, necessitating a very large cache pool), handles somewhere between a gigabyte to 2.5 gigabytes of data per hour (depending on the time of day, usually somewhere in the middle of this range, on average).

The Apache layer, which now boasts 32 GB of RAM and sports many CPU cores, handled 1,324,232 hits for Techrights (ranked 6636th for traffic in Netcraft) in this past week and 1,065,606 for Tux Machines (ranked 6214th for traffic in Netcraft).

Based on VISITORS Web Log Analyzer, this is what we've had in Techrights:

Windows: (36.2%)
Linux: (31.8%)
Unknown: (e.g. bots/spiders): (23.0%)
Macintosh: (8.8%)
FreeBSD: (0.1%)

As a graph (charted with LibreOffice):

Techrights stats

Tux Machines reveals a somewhat different pattern. Based on grepping/filtering the of past month's log at the Apache back end (not Varnish, which would have been a more sensible but harder thing to do), presenting the top 3 only:

Tuxmachines stats

One month is as far as retention goes, so it's not possible to show long-term trends (as before, based on Susan's summary of data). Logs older than that are automatically deleted, as promised, for both sites -- forever! We just need a small tail of data (temporarily) for DDOS prevention.

Mollom Issues

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Site News

TUX MACHINES has been having some issues with the spam filter, so people who regularly submit material, including comments, may have struggled to do so over the past fortnight of so. If that's the case, please re-attempt and report any issue you encounter to us (feedback button on the right).

Spring in Tux Machines

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Site News

Tux Machines traffic

Tux Machines traffic has been increasing during spring. The DDOS attacks are behind us thankfully, the latest problem is just a lot of spam, which we are deleting as soon as we can.

5 Best Data Recovery Tools For Linux To Recover Data Or Deleted Partitions

Filed under
Reviews


5 best data recovery tools for linux

Atleast once in life, most of us do wrong with the important data on our computer and then we think we must not have deleted this, whether some important documents or lectures' videos or bunch of important projects. Instead of cursing yourselves for such a foolish mistake, let's do some work. Let's try to recover that deleted data out from our HD. Here I am reviewing 5 of the best Data recover tools that can help recovering deleted data on Linux.

Read At LinuxAndUbuntu

Blog posts

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Site News

D

UE TO a growing SPAM problem (dozens per day making the front page), we have disabled -- temporarily at least -- the ability of random visitors to create new blog posts after registering for an account. We apologise in advance to any legitimate users this restriction may affect.

Happy Easter and Remarkable Spring

Filed under
Just talk

Happy Easter

Catchup Mode

Filed under
Site News

IN the coming days we will prioritise very recent news and of course important news, but at the same time we shall be catching up with some older but important news that we missed. This means that some older items (one or two weeks old) may occasionally appear. In lieu with requests from readers we will also stop abbreviating long summaries of news, such as today's leftovers and howto roundups.

On Break

Filed under
Site News

KDE laptops

THIS COMING WEEK, starting Tuesday in particular, will be a lot less busy than usual because Rianne and I are flying away and will be absent for a couple of weeks. Depending on availability of Wi-Fi, we ought to be able to still post some links, just not the usual volume of links.

We kindly ask anyone who is interested and willing to submit links highlighting relevant news, as every registered user can do that. It will greatly help us run the site while we are very far away in east Asia.

Airdroid - Transfer Files Between Android Phones/Tablets And Linux (Any Distribution)

Filed under
Reviews
 
airdroid transfer file between android phone/tablet and linux mint ubuntu

We often need to transfer large amount data in the form of mp3 Songs, Video Songs, Movies and most importantly, large Games between android phones/tablets and Linux machine. Transferring via USB cable takes time, so let's do it with 'Airdroid' easily and quickly.
 
 
 
 

Read at LinuxAndUbuntu

Opera 27 Stable Web Browser Released With Tab Preview Back, Install In Ubuntu, Linux Mint And Others ubuntu Derivatives

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News


opera 27 stable web browser released for install Linux mint/Ubuntu

Today Opera team released Opera 27 version with couple of major changes and with lots of fixes. This is the first stable release of 2015. Opera keeps on coming with beta releases that have several fixes. Although the beta versions were also good and can be used without any problems. This one is the stable release of Opera Web Browser containing two major changes and lots of fixes. Lets see at the changes in this release.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

Subsonic 5.1 Media Streamer Released, Install In Ubuntu/Linux Mint

Filed under
Linux


Subsonic 5.1 Released, Install In Ubuntu/Linux Mint

Subsonic is a nice free, multi-platform web basedmedia streamer, make large collection of music handling easy. You can share music with your frineds or stream your favorite music anywhere. You can stream to multiple players simultaneously.
 
 
 
 

Read at LinuxAndUbuntu

Ubuntu Flavors 15.04 Vivid Vervet Alpha 2 Released

Filed under
Linux


Picture

Ubuntu flavors 15.04 alpha 2 has been released for testing. Ubuntu Unity does not take part in the alpha releases. Flavors like Kylin, Ubuntu Gnome, Lubuntu and Kubuntu alpha 2 relases are available.




Read at LinuxAndUbuntu

How To Install Software In Linux : An Introduction

Filed under
Linux


Picture

In any operating system we need to install applications to complete our day to day tasks. In the world of Windows, every program has a simple Setup.exe or a program.zipfile. On a Mac a package is a program.dmg or aprogram.sit file. In both the operating system you can simply click it and it will ask you some very basic configuration questions like, do you accept the licence agreement or the directory you want to install the software to. Although in Linux, It seems tough to install theprograms/softwares but It's not true.  
 
 
 
 

Read at LinuxAndUbuntu

PostInstallerF Prepares Post Install In Ubuntu And Fedora

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Reviews


PostInstallerF prepares post install in Ubuntu and Fedora

It takes too much time to prepare a newly installed Operating System. First find the repositories, then add them to install the desired softwares. But PostInstallerFmakes that big task a lot easier. 
  
 
 
 

Read at LinuxAndUbuntu

How To Use 'Sudo' And 'Su' Commands In Linux : An Introduction

Filed under
Linux

linux commands sudo and su

Today We're going to discuss sudo and su, the very important and mostly used commands in Linux. It is very important for a Linux user to understand these two to increase security and prevent unexpected things that a user may have to go through. Firstly we will see what these commands do then we'll know the difference between both of them. So let's get started.
 
 
 
 

Read on LinuxAndUbuntu

APT Packaging Management Tool In Detail; Linux

Filed under
Linux


Linux APT Packaging Management Tool In Detail

A package is a 'Software'. Examples of the package can be the browsers (Google chrome, Mozilla, Safari etc.), utilities package (ccleaner, ASC, BleachBit etc.), designing program (Photoshop, Gimp etc.) and Games (Need for Speed, Call of Duty etc.). The packages/software are compiled and set altogether so that when someone executes them, all the files or scripts start and install the programs on the system. 
 
 
 
 
 

Read on LinuxAndUbuntu

Happy New Year From Roy and Rianne

Filed under
Just talk

Xmas tree

2014 was a great year for Tux Machines. The site moved to a new server with much higher capacity and better caching, Rianne and I moved to a better house, and we finally set up a tree the way we wanted to. Financial contributions from readers were enough to subsidise a laptop for Rianne and she now happily submits a lot of links from there.

In 2015 we expect to improve both volume and quality of links. We are going to think of ways to improve the Web site and we openly welcome suggestions from readers. The goal is to make the site more informative more efficiently. We wish to help readers steer away from cruft and gossip and instead identify news of importance, without repetition unless new information and details arise.

My Chromebook with KDE

Filed under
Reviews

I got my new Chromebook... Smile Yes, you've heard me right, but wait before you raise your eyebrows...

HP Chromebook 14

HP Chromebook 14

HP Chromebook 14

HP Chromebook 14

HP Chromebook 14

HP Chromebook 14

I installed Ubuntu on it as my default OS, though I can go back to Chrome OS any time I want. I don't see any point in doing it.

HP Chromebook 14

Roy helped me do the partitioning, configuration and tweaking. We configure it in a way so that I can use it in my work, not just for Facebooking, tweeting and chatting's sake.

HP Chromebook 14

HP Chromebook 14

I am still exploring the machine, basically familiarising with the keyboard and all the function settings on it. The Kubuntu environment which I chose will need some adjustments; also the applications which I downloaded are a bit different from the other laptop's (which I used to work on).

HP Chromebook 14

Change is good, but it requires a lot of patience and adaptation to the new environment.

HP Chromebook 14

I like my Chromebook very much. It is one of the best gifts I have received from my husband. It is more practical, it gives me more confidence to learn and to develop more of my computer skills. Innovation is fast-moving and technology is progressing, so you definitely need to catch up with it. Unless you want to be left behind by choice...

Holidays Calm

Filed under
Site News

Xmas
Our living room this past weekend

TOMORROW is my birthday, so we are going away to Liverpool for a while. Over the holidays we won't be too active in this site, at the very least because there is no major news, no announcements of substance, and we also wish to spend some time with our extended family.

As always, anyone in Tux Machines can create an account and submit stories to the front page (as of late only spammers have been doing that almost every morning). We encourage readers to submit any links which they find relevant and of interest to the community.

Vacation Photos

Filed under
Just talk

Tux and Rianne

Last week we did not post as much news as usual because we went to the south of England with Roy's sister. We did take some photos.

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