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KIARA 2.4 My Homemade KDE3 Distro

Filed under
Linux

KIARA GNU/Linux is a Live CD based on Slax with applications ported from Slackware 12.2, including virtually all official components of KDE 3.5.10, and is upgraded to contain the latest Web applications from Mozilla and Opera. KIARA combines a full-featured classic KDE3 desktop with an up-to-minute web experience. The live format lets you run legacy software with rock solid security, and keeps your hard drive free for when you need to run something a little less old-school.

KIARA releases immediately follow each new release of Mozilla Firefox

Besides KDE3, KIARA also contains some popular light Desktop GUI's, including FVWM, Fluxbox, and XFCE, and even some text-based applications chosen with running from the console in mind (emacs, irssi, lynx, and GNU Screen).

How do i get a nested virtual environment working?

Filed under
Linux

If you have ever had the need to get a nested virtual environment working, so virtualbox running inside vmware, I've put some instructions together un an ubuntu1110 server on my blog.

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Where did eth0 go after migrating my VMware Ubuntu machine?

Filed under
Linux

If you've every had to migrate a Linux machine in VMware or Virtualbox, you'll probably have noticed that the eth0 either disappears or changes to eth1 I've put up on my blog why this happens, and how to solve the problem.

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My 20 Most Used Android Apps.

Filed under
Just talk

It seems almost obligatory to do some form of App List and as such these are my personally most used Apps on my Android Mobile.

Read More: http://me.hippofield.com/2011/10/my-20-most-used-android-apps.html

Ubuntu 11.10 - Take 2

Filed under
Linux

Back in October i wrote what was described as a scathing post about the lack of innovation coming out of Canonical.

The complete lack of innovation part i feel stands. However I have had a chance to play with the Unity Interface and I'm getting accustomed to it.

It seems the move toward a more OSX looking system is very obvious especially when the background is changed and the borders are changed to a lighter colour.

Read More: http://me.hippofield.com/2011/11/ubuntu-1110-take-2.html

Apache Software Foundation incubating openoffice.org

Filed under
News

A new Apache project.

Pinguy OS - A Fully loaded Ubuntu respin which should suit new Linux users..

Filed under
Linux

It's not without surprise that Ubuntu is not without its faults, one of them is, from a new users perspective it's a Distro which does need a lot to setup to get it functional. What Pinguy Tries to do is provide a better Out of the Box experience..

Read More: me.hippofield.com

n/a

Kubuntu 11.10: It seems that there is a problem.

Filed under
Linux

I guess this is a bug report. I'll be filing this soon, probably tomorrow, but I wonder if anybody else has seen this.

The screens hots probably aren't going to show up here so go to http://unityisntthatbad.blogspot.com/

Linux is far from dead on the desktop, but it is time to start again..

Filed under
Linux

Linux is an important OS, has a long history, and serves many people well, which is why it is time to kill it and end this game...

These are not the ramblings of a lunatic looking to start a flame war.. This is the reality in todays dog eat dog world.

Read More: http://me.hippofield.com/2011/10/linux-is-far-from-dead-on-desktop-but.html

Hard Drive Purchase and Thailand Flooding

Filed under
Just talk

My 2nd desktop is largely reserved for video editing. As it often the issue with video editing, storage space is getting scarce. The sata hard drive has 320 GB, and it's getting full. Time to purchase a new hard disk drive...

2011 - Has Internet TV really moved forward, can you really cut the cable?

Filed under
Just talk

Back in 2008 I wrote a blog post about the state of Internet TV at the time, which was fairly well received. nearly 4 years on its time to re-assess the state of Internet TV.

Since 2008 when Internet based TV was really just starting the landscape has really changed, gone in a large proportion of the examples I gave they were very much Windows focussed. However the device landscape itself has changed hugely since 2008. Mainly due to the iPad and Android platforms, what is available has become platform agnostic, which has made the whole concept of cutting the cable and going internet only far easier.

As a Linux user is this easier or harder than it was in 2008?

Read More:
http://me.hippofield.com/2011/10/2011-has-internet-tv-really-moved.html

Zentyal Linux, a usable Linux Server

Filed under
Linux

I've flip flopped over the years between many linux distros for Servers, from CentOS and Ubuntu following the great guides at Howtoforge while learning how different things work. Now however i'm looking for quick and easy solutions to problems.

6 Linux as a Service Distros you should know about..

Filed under
Linux

There are many Linux Distros out there, covering all manner of reasons for having them, what i've put together here is my list of the 6 Most useful Linux Distros I actually use regularly. I'm not looking at Linux Desktop's here, these are LaaS Linux as a Service Distros each one providing a certain type of functionality and should be kept in any half decent tech's Knowledge Base.

http://me.hippofield.com/2011/10/6-linux-as-service-distros-you-should.html

Konqueror in KDE4. It's not so terrible, I guess.

Filed under
Linux

I was a Konqueror fanboy before I was KDE fanboy. Lately, Konqueror hasn't even been part of the default Desktop in Kubuntu. There are people who still haven't gotten over the switch to KDE4, and Konqueror is usually the reason. In KDE3, Konqueror was the most comprehensive desktop application ever, a web browser as well as a file manager, but it was even more than that.

Sabayon 7 GNOME 3 review

Filed under
Linux

Sabayon is a Linux distribution described by its developers as “… a bleeding edge operating system that is both stable and reliable.” It is based on Gentoo, a source-based distribution. The latest edition, Sabayon 7, was released just last week.

My plan to use KDE3 forever.

I call it "Live-rooting'...

OpenIndiana Desktop 151 review

Filed under
Reviews

OpenIndiana is a distribution of illumos, which is a community fork of OpenSolaris. And OpenSolaris itself was the open source version of Solaris, before it was discontinued by Oracle, after Oracle acquired Sun Microsystems, Inc., in January 2010.

ChromeOS in VirtualBox

Filed under
Just talk

Took a little break tonight from compiling 64bit PCLinuxOS packages. I took a peek at ChromeOS in Virtualbox. Pretty much the Chrome browser with a login screen and additional settings. Wanna play with ChromeOS in Virtualbox then you can get a vanilla image from the link below.

http://hexxeh.net/?p=328117684

Fred

Filed under
Just talk

That crazy puppy. He's such a nutball. Tonight he caught some kind of big *ss bug that started squawking when Fred chomped down on it and he ran all around the yard to try and get away from it. But it was in his mouth. It took him about 3 laps to figure it out. lol It was hilarious.

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  • Why Uber Engineering Switched from Postgres to MySQL
    The early architecture of Uber consisted of a monolithic backend application written in Python that used Postgres for data persistence. Since that time, the architecture of Uber has changed significantly, to a model of microservices and new data platforms. Specifically, in many of the cases where we previously used Postgres, we now use Schemaless, a novel database sharding layer built on top of MySQL. In this article, we’ll explore some of the drawbacks we found with Postgres and explain the decision to build Schemaless and other backend services on top of MySQL.
  • GNU Hyperbole 6.0.1 for Emacs 24.4 to 25 is released
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  • JavaScript keeps its spot atop programming language rankings
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  • Plenty of fish in the C, IEEE finds in language popularity contest
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