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Operating Systems in Tux Machines

Filed under
Site News

Summary: Some numbers to show what goes on in sites that do not share information about their visitors (unlike Windows-centric sites which target non-technical audiences)

THE common perception of GNU/Linux is that it is scarcely used, based on statistics gathered from privacy-hostile Web sites that share (or sell) access log data, embed spyware in all of their pages, and so on. Our sites are inherently different because of a reasonable -- if not sometimes fanatic -- appreciation of privacy at both ends (server and client). People who read technical sites know how to block ads, impede spurious scripts etc. These sites also actively avoid anything which is privacy-infringing, such as interactive 'social' media buttons (these let third parties spy on all visitors in all pages).

Techrights and Tux Machines attract the lion's share our traffic (and server capacity). They both have dedicated servers. These are truly popular and some of the leaders in their respective areas. Techrights deals with threats to software freedom, whereas Tux Machines is about real-time news discovery and organisation (pertaining to Free software and GNU/Linux).

The Varnish layer, which protects both of these large sites (nearly 100,000 pages in each, necessitating a very large cache pool), handles somewhere between a gigabyte to 2.5 gigabytes of data per hour (depending on the time of day, usually somewhere in the middle of this range, on average).

The Apache layer, which now boasts 32 GB of RAM and sports many CPU cores, handled 1,324,232 hits for Techrights (ranked 6636th for traffic in Netcraft) in this past week and 1,065,606 for Tux Machines (ranked 6214th for traffic in Netcraft).

Based on VISITORS Web Log Analyzer, this is what we've had in Techrights:

Windows: (36.2%)
Linux: (31.8%)
Unknown: (e.g. bots/spiders): (23.0%)
Macintosh: (8.8%)
FreeBSD: (0.1%)

As a graph (charted with LibreOffice):

Techrights stats

Tux Machines reveals a somewhat different pattern. Based on grepping/filtering the of past month's log at the Apache back end (not Varnish, which would have been a more sensible but harder thing to do), presenting the top 3 only:

Tuxmachines stats

One month is as far as retention goes, so it's not possible to show long-term trends (as before, based on Susan's summary of data). Logs older than that are automatically deleted, as promised, for both sites -- forever! We just need a small tail of data (temporarily) for DDOS prevention.

Mollom Issues

Filed under
Site News

TUX MACHINES has been having some issues with the spam filter, so people who regularly submit material, including comments, may have struggled to do so over the past fortnight of so. If that's the case, please re-attempt and report any issue you encounter to us (feedback button on the right).

Spring in Tux Machines

Filed under
Site News

Tux Machines traffic

Tux Machines traffic has been increasing during spring. The DDOS attacks are behind us thankfully, the latest problem is just a lot of spam, which we are deleting as soon as we can.

5 Best Data Recovery Tools For Linux To Recover Data Or Deleted Partitions

Filed under
Reviews


5 best data recovery tools for linux

Atleast once in life, most of us do wrong with the important data on our computer and then we think we must not have deleted this, whether some important documents or lectures' videos or bunch of important projects. Instead of cursing yourselves for such a foolish mistake, let's do some work. Let's try to recover that deleted data out from our HD. Here I am reviewing 5 of the best Data recover tools that can help recovering deleted data on Linux.

Read At LinuxAndUbuntu

Blog posts

Filed under
Site News

D

UE TO a growing SPAM problem (dozens per day making the front page), we have disabled -- temporarily at least -- the ability of random visitors to create new blog posts after registering for an account. We apologise in advance to any legitimate users this restriction may affect.

Happy Easter and Remarkable Spring

Filed under
Just talk

Happy Easter

Catchup Mode

Filed under
Site News

IN the coming days we will prioritise very recent news and of course important news, but at the same time we shall be catching up with some older but important news that we missed. This means that some older items (one or two weeks old) may occasionally appear. In lieu with requests from readers we will also stop abbreviating long summaries of news, such as today's leftovers and howto roundups.

On Break

Filed under
Site News

KDE laptops

THIS COMING WEEK, starting Tuesday in particular, will be a lot less busy than usual because Rianne and I are flying away and will be absent for a couple of weeks. Depending on availability of Wi-Fi, we ought to be able to still post some links, just not the usual volume of links.

We kindly ask anyone who is interested and willing to submit links highlighting relevant news, as every registered user can do that. It will greatly help us run the site while we are very far away in east Asia.

Airdroid - Transfer Files Between Android Phones/Tablets And Linux (Any Distribution)

Filed under
Reviews
 
airdroid transfer file between android phone/tablet and linux mint ubuntu

We often need to transfer large amount data in the form of mp3 Songs, Video Songs, Movies and most importantly, large Games between android phones/tablets and Linux machine. Transferring via USB cable takes time, so let's do it with 'Airdroid' easily and quickly.
 
 
 
 

Read at LinuxAndUbuntu

Opera 27 Stable Web Browser Released With Tab Preview Back, Install In Ubuntu, Linux Mint And Others ubuntu Derivatives

Filed under
News


opera 27 stable web browser released for install Linux mint/Ubuntu

Today Opera team released Opera 27 version with couple of major changes and with lots of fixes. This is the first stable release of 2015. Opera keeps on coming with beta releases that have several fixes. Although the beta versions were also good and can be used without any problems. This one is the stable release of Opera Web Browser containing two major changes and lots of fixes. Lets see at the changes in this release.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

Subsonic 5.1 Media Streamer Released, Install In Ubuntu/Linux Mint

Filed under
Linux


Subsonic 5.1 Released, Install In Ubuntu/Linux Mint

Subsonic is a nice free, multi-platform web basedmedia streamer, make large collection of music handling easy. You can share music with your frineds or stream your favorite music anywhere. You can stream to multiple players simultaneously.
 
 
 
 

Read at LinuxAndUbuntu

Ubuntu Flavors 15.04 Vivid Vervet Alpha 2 Released

Filed under
Linux


Picture

Ubuntu flavors 15.04 alpha 2 has been released for testing. Ubuntu Unity does not take part in the alpha releases. Flavors like Kylin, Ubuntu Gnome, Lubuntu and Kubuntu alpha 2 relases are available.




Read at LinuxAndUbuntu

How To Install Software In Linux : An Introduction

Filed under
Linux


Picture

In any operating system we need to install applications to complete our day to day tasks. In the world of Windows, every program has a simple Setup.exe or a program.zipfile. On a Mac a package is a program.dmg or aprogram.sit file. In both the operating system you can simply click it and it will ask you some very basic configuration questions like, do you accept the licence agreement or the directory you want to install the software to. Although in Linux, It seems tough to install theprograms/softwares but It's not true.  
 
 
 
 

Read at LinuxAndUbuntu

PostInstallerF Prepares Post Install In Ubuntu And Fedora

Filed under
Reviews


PostInstallerF prepares post install in Ubuntu and Fedora

It takes too much time to prepare a newly installed Operating System. First find the repositories, then add them to install the desired softwares. But PostInstallerFmakes that big task a lot easier. 
  
 
 
 

Read at LinuxAndUbuntu

How To Use 'Sudo' And 'Su' Commands In Linux : An Introduction

Filed under
Linux

linux commands sudo and su

Today We're going to discuss sudo and su, the very important and mostly used commands in Linux. It is very important for a Linux user to understand these two to increase security and prevent unexpected things that a user may have to go through. Firstly we will see what these commands do then we'll know the difference between both of them. So let's get started.
 
 
 
 

Read on LinuxAndUbuntu

APT Packaging Management Tool In Detail; Linux

Filed under
Linux


Linux APT Packaging Management Tool In Detail

A package is a 'Software'. Examples of the package can be the browsers (Google chrome, Mozilla, Safari etc.), utilities package (ccleaner, ASC, BleachBit etc.), designing program (Photoshop, Gimp etc.) and Games (Need for Speed, Call of Duty etc.). The packages/software are compiled and set altogether so that when someone executes them, all the files or scripts start and install the programs on the system. 
 
 
 
 
 

Read on LinuxAndUbuntu

Happy New Year From Roy and Rianne

Filed under
Just talk

Xmas tree

2014 was a great year for Tux Machines. The site moved to a new server with much higher capacity and better caching, Rianne and I moved to a better house, and we finally set up a tree the way we wanted to. Financial contributions from readers were enough to subsidise a laptop for Rianne and she now happily submits a lot of links from there.

In 2015 we expect to improve both volume and quality of links. We are going to think of ways to improve the Web site and we openly welcome suggestions from readers. The goal is to make the site more informative more efficiently. We wish to help readers steer away from cruft and gossip and instead identify news of importance, without repetition unless new information and details arise.

My Chromebook with KDE

Filed under
Reviews

I got my new Chromebook... Smile Yes, you've heard me right, but wait before you raise your eyebrows...

HP Chromebook 14

HP Chromebook 14

HP Chromebook 14

HP Chromebook 14

HP Chromebook 14

HP Chromebook 14

I installed Ubuntu on it as my default OS, though I can go back to Chrome OS any time I want. I don't see any point in doing it.

HP Chromebook 14

Roy helped me do the partitioning, configuration and tweaking. We configure it in a way so that I can use it in my work, not just for Facebooking, tweeting and chatting's sake.

HP Chromebook 14

HP Chromebook 14

I am still exploring the machine, basically familiarising with the keyboard and all the function settings on it. The Kubuntu environment which I chose will need some adjustments; also the applications which I downloaded are a bit different from the other laptop's (which I used to work on).

HP Chromebook 14

Change is good, but it requires a lot of patience and adaptation to the new environment.

HP Chromebook 14

I like my Chromebook very much. It is one of the best gifts I have received from my husband. It is more practical, it gives me more confidence to learn and to develop more of my computer skills. Innovation is fast-moving and technology is progressing, so you definitely need to catch up with it. Unless you want to be left behind by choice...

Holidays Calm

Filed under
Site News

Xmas
Our living room this past weekend

TOMORROW is my birthday, so we are going away to Liverpool for a while. Over the holidays we won't be too active in this site, at the very least because there is no major news, no announcements of substance, and we also wish to spend some time with our extended family.

As always, anyone in Tux Machines can create an account and submit stories to the front page (as of late only spammers have been doing that almost every morning). We encourage readers to submit any links which they find relevant and of interest to the community.

Vacation Photos

Filed under
Just talk

Tux and Rianne

Last week we did not post as much news as usual because we went to the south of England with Roy's sister. We did take some photos.

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More in Tux Machines

Programming Leftovers

  • Intel Is Working On A New ‘Data Parallel C++’ Programming Language

    ntel has been working on its OneAPI project for quite some time. The company has now shared more details of the software project — including the launch of a new programming language called “Data Parallel C++ (DPC++).”

  • 6 Best Data Science and Machine Learning Courses for Beginners

    Many programmers are moving towards data science and machine learning hoping for better pay and career opportunities --- and there is a reason for it. The Data scientist has been ranked the number one job on Glassdoor for last a couple of years and the average salary of a data scientist is over** $120,000** in the United States according to Indeed. Data science is not only a rewarding career in terms of money but it also provides the opportunity for you to solve some of the world's most interesting problems. IMHO, that's the main motivation many good programmers are moving towards data science, machine learning and artificial intelligence.

  • Find the smallest number within a list with python

    In this example, we will create a python function which will take in a list of numbers and then return the smallest value. The solution to this problem is first to create a place holder for the first number within the list, then compares that number with other numbers within the same list in the loop. If the program found a number which is smaller than the one in the place holder, then the smaller number will be assigned to that place holder.

  • Basic Input, Output, and String Formatting in Python

    To be useful, a program usually needs to communicate with the outside world by obtaining input data from the user and displaying result data back to the user. This tutorial will introduce you to Python input and output. Input may come directly from the user via the keyboard, or from some external source like a file or database. Output can be displayed directly to the console or IDE, to the screen via a Graphical User Interface (GUI), or again to an external source.

  • Want to level up your Python? Join Weekly Python Exercise, starting July 2nd

    Let’s face it: Stack Overflow has made developers’ lives easier. Almost every time I have a question, I find that someone on Stack Overflow has asked it, and that people have answered it, often in great detail. I’m thus not against Stack Overflow, not by a long shot. But I have found that many Python developers visit there 10 or even 20 times a day, to find answers (and even code) that they can use to solve their problems.

  • Introducing pytest-elk-reporter

    Few years back I’ve wrote a post about how I’ve connected python based test to ELK setup - “ELK is fun”, it was using an xunit xml, parsing it and sending it via Logstash. Over time I’ve learn a lot about ElasticSearch and it’s friend Kibana, using them as a tool to handle logs. and also as a backend for a search component on my previous job. So now I know logstash isn’t needed for reporting test result, posting straight into elasticsearch is easier and gives you better control, ES is doing anything “automagiclly” anyhow nowadays.

Graphics: Weston 6.0.1, GPUs in OpenStack, Panfrost and Vulkan

  • weston 6.0.1
    Weston 6.0.1 is released with build system fixes to smooth the
    transition to Meson. Other miscellaneous bugfixes are also included.
    
    Note that the PGP signing key has changed to 0FDE7BE0E88F5E48.
    
    - (1):
          zunitc: Fix undeclared identifier 'NULL'
    
    Alexandros Frantzis (1):
          clients/simple-dmabuf-egl: Properly check for error in gbm_bo_get_handle_for_plane
    
    Antonio Borneo (2):
          clients: close unused keymap fd
          log: remove "%m" from format strings by using strerror(errno)
    
    Daniel Stone (2):
          weston: Properly test for output-creation failure
          compositor: Don't ignore --use-pixman for Wayland backend
    
    Fabrice Fontaine (1):
          Fix build with kernel < 4.4
    
    Harish Krupo (4):
          meson.build: Fix warning for configure_file
          window.c: Don't assume registry advertisement order
          data-device: send INVALID_FINISH when operation != dnd
          Fix: clients/window: Premature finish request when copy-pasting
    
    Kamal Pandey (1):
          FIX: weston: clients: typo in simple-dmabuf-egl.c
    
    Luca Weiss (1):
          Fix incorrect include
    
    Marius Vlad (3):
          meson.build/libweston: Fix clang warning for export-dynamic
          compositor: Fix invalid view numbering in scene-graph
          compositor: Fix missing new line when displaying buffer type for EGL buffer
    
    Pekka Paalanen (7):
          meson: link editor with gobject-2.0
          meson: link cms-colord with glib and gobject
          meson: link remoting with glib and gobject
          meson: DRM-backend demands GBM
          meson: dep fix for compositor.h needing xkbcommon.h
          build: add missing dep to x11 backend
          libweston: fix protocol install path
    
    Scott Anderson (1):
          compositor: Fix incorrect use of bool options
    
    Sebastian Wick (1):
          weston-terminal: Fix weston-terminal crash on mutter
    
    Silva Alejandro Ismael (1):
          compositor: fix segfaults if wl_display_create fails
    
    Simon Ser (1):
          build: bump to version 6.0.1 for the point release
    
    Tomohito Esaki (1):
          cairo-util: Don't set title string to Pango layout if the title is NULL
    
    git tag: 6.0.1
    
  • Wayland's Weston 6.0.1 Released With Build System Fixes & Other Corrections

    Weston 6.0 was released back in March with a remote/streaming plug-in and Meson becoming the preferred build system among other improvements. Weston 6.0.1 was released today by Simon Ser with various fixes to this reference Wayland compositor. Weston 6.0.1 is mostly made up of Meson build system fixes/improvements to ensure a good Meson experience. There is also a fix for building with pre-4.4 kernels and a variety of other smaller fixes.

  • OpenStack Stein feature highlights: vGPU support coming in Red Hat OpenStack Platform 15

    Red Hat is working on the next release of the supported enterprise distribution of OpenStack, Red Hat OpenStack Platform 15, based on the Stein community release. In this multi-part blog series, we’ll be examining some of the features that Red Hat and the open source community have collaborated on–starting with a look to future workloads, such as artificial intelligence. "How does OpenStack enable next generation workloads?" you ask. When it comes to computer-driven decision making, machine learning algorithms can provide adaptable services that can get better over time. Some of these workloads, such as facial recognition, require GPUs to ingest and process graphical data in real time. But the more powerful GPUs often used for machine learning and such are expensive, power-hungry, and can take up a lot of room in the servers' chassis. When working with GPUs at scale, optimized utilization is key to more cost effective machine learning.

  • Panfrost Gallium3D Picks Up Yet More Features Thanks To Collabora's Summer Internship

    Just a few days ago I wrote how the Panfrost Gallium3D driver continues making incredible progress for this community-driven, open-source graphics driver targeting Arm Bifrost/Midgard graphics. There's yet another batch of new features and improvements to talk about. Most of this feature work continues to be done by Panfrost lead developer Alyssa Rosenzweig who is interning at Collabora this summer and appears to be spending most of her time working on this reverse-engineered Arm graphics driver supporting their recent generations of IP.

  • Vulkan 1.1.112 Released While Open-Source ANV + RADV Drivers Continue Marching Along

    Vulkan 1.1.112 was outed this morning as the newest documentation update to this high performance graphics and compute API. Vulkan 1.1.112 is quite a mundane update with just documentation corrections and clarifications this go around and not any new extensions. But at least the clarifications should help out some and other maintenance items addressed by this Vulkan 1.1.112 release. It's not a surprise the release is so small considering Vulkan 1.1.111 was issued just two weeks ago.

today's howtos

5 Best and Free Desktop Email Clients for Linux and Windows

If you are looking for free Email clients for Linux and Windows – here are 5 of them we list which you can try and consider for casual or professional uses. Web based email is popular today which can be accessed via browser or mobile apps. However, big and medium enterprises, generic users still prefers native desktop email clients for heavy and office uses. Microsoft Outlook is the most popular desktop email client which is of course not free and you have to pay huge licence fee to use. There are multiple options for free desktop email clients available. Here are the best 5 free and open source email clients which you can go ahead and try then deploy for your needs. Read more