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YaST (Yet another SUSE 10.1 RC2 Trial), Part 2

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Reviews

Installing Xgl on Suse 10.1 RC2 couldn't be simpler. It does require video acceleration; typically, that means using an nVidia or ATI graphics card with the manufacturer's proprietary drivers installed (see the Xgl page on the Suse wiki for more information).

YaST (Yet another SUSE 10.1 RC2 Trial), Part 1

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Reviews

Even though I swore I'd keep Fedora Core around for a while, it only took 3 months before I replaced it with Suse (again). It's all Xgl's fault. The Kororaa Live CD is very cool. Since Xgl was created by a Novell engineer, and there are Xgl binaries for Suse, and since Suse is coming out with a new version, and (fintally!) since Xgl hasn't made it into Debian Sid yet, it made sense to install Suse to use as an Xgl testbed.

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To 64 or Not to 64, That Was the Question

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Reviews

With my nice new motherboard & cpu, I've been quite anxious to test some of my new-found powers. My first thought after the hardware installation was: Gentoo 64-bit! By way of testing, I installed the 64-bit version of SuSE 10.1 rc1 yesterday and had planned on writing this wonderfully informative comparison article of it and the 32-bit version. I was expecting the 64-bit to smoke 32 and had even made preliminary reads into installing the 64-bit version of Gentoo. Since this was my first foray into the world of 64-bit, I expected to be lost and confused. Well, the former may not have come to fruition, but the latter certainly did.

Simple and Easy Linux File System diagram

fscking Drupal Man!

I pull in the rss feed from drupal.org, mainly to be sure to get security updates asap. Well this morning they had this as their opening paragraph:

With 4.7 nearing completition, it has been decided that for the next version we should look for another language as PHP is now blocks our growing. As you will read in the newsletter, we have found many very obscure language obstacles. We worked around them, but this can not go on. Also, in the IRC development channel, it was said for a long time that Drupal will be rewritten in Haskell, so that was a primary option.

tuxmachines' new rig

As many of you know, my old AMD 2800+ system popped a vessel approximately two weeks ago and a friend suggested I post a request for donations to help fund the purchase of new equipment. The response was great and we raised over 200 USD in 3 days. I purchased an Asus A8V motherboard, AMD 64 3700+ and 1 gig of Kingston HyperX DDR400 memory for a final pricetag with shipping of $439.

SUSE 10.1 Beta NINE?

OMG, I see a beta 9 directory showing up on mirrors around the world. Does this mean yet another beta instead of a release candidate? What does this mean for the release schedule?

Tuxmachines Hardware Drive

We have recently suffered the loss of our linux review test system. If you'd like to donate towards the purchase of new equipment, please click the Paypal Donation button located in the right hand column of our site. Any help is greatly appreciated.

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Quake3 on BIIIG Screen

It's amazing how much more fun games are when you can play them on really large, high-resolution screens. Our lab also has a 24 monitor display wall, and as you can see from the pictures below, I got Quake 3 running on it. Full Story.

Here we go again with the XGL

First it was Novell announcing its contribution of the Xgl graphics subsystem and the 'Compiz ' compositing manager to the X.org project. These enhancements open up a whole world of hardware acceleration, fancy animation, separating hardware resolution from software resolution, and more. As a result, Linux desktops will become more usable, end-user productivity will increase, and Linux is firmly positioned at the forefront of client computing technology.

Now Fedora jumps in and is doing something totally different than Novell. AIGLX is a project that aims to enable GL-accelerated effects on a standard desktop. We have a lightly modified X server (that includes a couple of extensions), an updated Mesa package that adds some new protocol support and a version of metacity with a composite manager.

Monitoring Servers and Clients using Munin in Debian Linux

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Howtos

Munin the tool surveys all your computers and remembers what it saw. It presents all the information in in graphs through a web interface. Its emphasis is on plug and play capabilities. After completing a installation a high number of monitoring plugins will be playing with no more effort. Using Munin you can easily monitor the performance of your computers, networks, SANs, and quite possibly applications as well.

Tuxmachines: 4th quarter Report

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Site News

February 4th was Tuxmachines official one year anniversary. Although I put a site up and added content 6 months prior, it was static and unknown. A year ago I began putting a little content in this little cms called Drupal and we've been growing every since. Tuxmachines continued to showed some growth early part of the quarter, but perhaps has now leveled off some.

Debian server Setup Guide

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Howtos

Here are the Step by Step tutorials how to setup Debian server this includes:

Debian Installation
FTP Server Setup in debian
Webserver Setup in Debian
Samba Server Setup in Debian
Database Server Setup in Debian
Time clock sync for debian server
Mail Server Configuration in Debian

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Mozilla: Analysis Maturation Plan, Content Security Policy and Firefox Reality

  • Analysis Maturation Plan

    To summarize the problem, I need to be able to share analyses with my peers at Mozilla (often HTML documents generated by Rmarkdown). Currently, we effectively dump documents onto an FTP server tied to a webserver (called Hala). This works pretty well, but it makes it almost impossible to search and discover other people's analyses and makes getting review difficult. To address these two problems, we put together mozilla.report and mozilla-private.report. These are effectively lightweight blog indexes for public and private analyses. This works OK, but it still requires analysts to take the time to check in their results and get review. It's a little heavy weight and isn't getting as much use as I would like. Hell, I don't even use it all the time just because I'm busy.

  • Test the new Content Security Policy for Content Scripts

    As part of our efforts to make add-ons safer for users, and to support evolving manifest v3 features, we are making changes to apply the Content Security Policy (CSP) to content scripts used in extensions. These changes will make it easier to enforce our long-standing policy of disallowing execution of remote code. When this feature is completed and enabled, remotely hosted code will not run, and attempts to run them will result in a network error. We have taken our time implementing this change to decrease the likelihood of breaking extensions and to maintain compatibility. Programmatically limiting the execution of remotely hosted code is an important aspect of manifest v3, and we feel it is a good time to move forward with these changes now. We have landed a new content script CSP, the first part of these changes, behind preferences in Firefox 72. We’d love for developers to test it out to see how their extensions will be affected.

  • Discover on desktop or mobile. Enjoy in VR, only with Firefox Reality.

    A special update for Firefox Reality is available today -- just in time for the holidays! Now you can send tabs from your phone or computer straight to your VR headset. Say you’re waiting in line for your festive peppermint mocha, killing time on your phone. You stumble on an epic 3D roller coaster video that would be great to watch in VR. Since you’ve already signed in to your Firefox Account on Firefox Reality, you can send that video right to your headset, where it will be ready to watch next time you open the app. You can also send tabs from VR over to your phone or desktop, for when you eventually take your headset off. When you use Firefox on multiple devices, you can sync your history and bookmarks too. No more waving the laser pointer around to type wonky URLs or trying retrace your steps back to that super funny site from yesterday. Stay tuned in the new year for more features like these that make using VR a more seamless part of your everyday life.

Devices: Axiomtek, Vecow and Canonical on Robotics

  • Tiny i.MX6 UL DIN-rail computer has dual mini-PCIe slots

    Axiomtek’s compact, rugged “Agent200-FL-DC” DIN-rail computer runs Linux on a low-power i.MX6 UL. Features include 10/100 Ethernet, USB, serial, DIO, optional CAN, and 2x mini-PCIe with a SIM slot. Axiomtek has posted product details for a “coming soon” Agent200-FL-DC DIN-rail computer. Like last year’s similar IFB125 and the IFB122 from 2017, the Agent200-FL-DC is a headless gateway that runs a Yocto based Linux stack on NXP’s 528MHz Cortex-A7 based i.MX6 UltraLight (UL) SoC. This time it’s Yocto 2.4 “Rocko” running on a newer Linux kernel 4.9.88. This is the only one of the three that also supports Ubuntu 18.04 (with the same kernel), as well as Android 8.1.

  • Huge Coffee Lake Refresh system has four PCIe slots for Nvidia and AMD graphics

    Vecow’s rugged, Linux-friendly “GPC-1000” computer has 8th or 9th Gen CPUs with up to 64GB DDR4 and provides 4x PCIe slots that support dual-slot graphics.

  • Key considerations when choosing a robot?s operating system

Mesa 19.3.0 Released

  • Mesa 19.3.0 Release Notes / 2019-12-12

    Mesa 19.3.0 is a new development release. People who are concerned with stability and reliability should stick with a previous release or wait for Mesa 19.3.1. Mesa 19.3.0 implements the OpenGL 4.6 API, but the version reported by glGetString(GL_VERSION) or glGetIntegerv(GL_MAJOR_VERSION) / glGetIntegerv(GL_MINOR_VERSION) depends on the particular driver being used. Some drivers don't support all the features required in OpenGL 4.6. OpenGL 4.6 is only available if requested at context creation. Compatibility contexts may report a lower version depending on each driver. Mesa 19.3.0 implements the Vulkan 1.1 API, but the version reported by the apiVersion property of the VkPhysicalDeviceProperties struct depends on the particular driver being used.

  • Mesa 19.3 Released With Big Updates For Intel's Open-Source Drivers, Valve ACO Option

    After a few weeks worth of delays due to blocker bugs the release of Mesa 19.3 is out today as a big end-of-year upgrade to the open-source OpenGL and Vulkan drivers for Linux systems. Intel and AMD Radeon driver changes largely dominate the work as always but there is a growing number of embedded driver changes and other enhancements for this crucial piece to the open-source 3D ecosystem.

Python Programming, Rust and Puppet Enterprise 3

  • Circuit Python at PyConf Hyderabad

    Coding in/with hardware has become my biggest stress buster for me ever since I have been introduced to it in PyCon Pune 2017 by John. Coding with hardware provides a real-life interaction with the code you write. It flourishes creativity. I can do all of this while I learn something new. Now I look for auctions to offer me a chance to code in/with Hardware. It gives the chance to escape the muggle world.

  • New in testmon 1.0.0

    Significant portions of testmon have been rewritten for v 1.0.1. Although the UI is mostly the same, there are some significant differences.

  • Determining affected tests

    Automatically determining affected tests sounds too good to be true. Python developers rightfully have a suspecting attitude towards any tool which tries to be too clever about their source code. Code completion and symbol searching doesn't need to be 100% reliable but messing with the test suite execution? This page explains what testmon tries and what it does not try to achieve. [...] After running the test with coverage analysis and parsing the source code, testmon determines which blocks does test_s.py::test_add depend on. In our example it's Block 1,2 and 4. (and not Block 3). testmon doesn't store the whole code of the block but just a checksum of it. Block 3 can be changed to anything. As long as the Block 1,2 and 4 stay the same, the execution path for test_s.py::test_add and it's outcome will stay the same.

  • How to set-up and use py.test in Pycharm

    I've been using Vim and terminal as a weapon of choice for years. I've had a good time with it, however, more and more people ask me why I'm using this setup. And honestly, I don't know the answer. I'm aware that things can be done more efficiently and an IDE can help with a lot of things. I guess that my weak spot is the unit tests and testing my code in general. I'm not running my tests when on the coding spree, I'm breaking lots of stuff, and only when I think I'm finished, I'll do the fixing and make everything running green again. Well, I would like to change that. And I'm also curious about trying out new ways of doing things. The obvious choice for programming in Python is the PyCharm. It's a nice IDE, supports many features that I like and most importantly, it can help with the testing. PyCharm can easily integrate with popular test frameworks and run the tests for me.

  • This Week in Rust 316
  • Continuous Delivery for Puppet Enterprise 3.0 is now available

    I am very excited to announce the immediate availability of Continuous Delivery for Puppet Enterprise 3.0! Over the last year, we’ve taken to heart the challenges and recommendations our customers have shared with us on how we can make Continuous Delivery for Puppet Enterprise better. Our intent is to be truly customer-obsessed, meet our customers where they are, and help them get to where they want to be. This release focuses on our customers’ needs by providing more context into the impact of a proposed Puppet change by offering Hiera support for Impact Analysis, a simplified approach to defining pipelines as code, and the ability to easily compose custom deployment processes (currently in beta!). Let’s dive in!