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PCLinuxOS Preview 9.1 updated and released.

PCLinuxOS Preview 9.1 is now posted up on the bittorrent tracker located at This is an update for the livecd with fixes for various issues found after the release of preview 9.

A New High in Low

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The windows from which President John F Kennedy is said to have been assassinated are to go up for auction in the United States, it emerged today. Tho the Secret Service reports that everything including the kitchen sink was confiscated from that room at the time of the assassination. There's just no end to what some folks'll do to make a buck.


Yikes! Mad Cow Cover-Up?

Dr. Lester Friedlander, a former USDA vet, said that inspectors are allowed only 15 seconds of inspection and that unhygenic practices are common in the meat industry; practices such as cow carcass abscesses being hosed off, wrapped up and shipped to the consumer. He also states that some supervisors were more concerned about falsifying inspection documents than protecting consumers.

Where's the beef?

err, I mean beta? Wasn't mandrak^H^Hiva supposed to release a 2006 beta 1 on the 15th? I've not seen any mention of it on the cooker mailing list or sign on the mirrors. Seems they are having some troubles, but that's a business as usual (for any developing distro). They were having some mirror syncing problems a few days back, I experienced this first hand when I tried to update my cooker install as well as some conflict with kde packages. There might be some shorewall bug problems, there's some mention of libtool gcc compatibility, and some grub conflicts a day or two ago. Anyway, I keep looking for a beta everyday. Somebody poke me if they see it.

Holy Multitasking Batman

While perusing my favorite thread of my favorite site I saw this setup. The appropriate witty response failed me as I first thought "You need to get to work son" or "quit wasting time" or perhaps "you should take up computing"... my mind raced around as all I could utter was "holy cow".

Anyway, I thought it was interesting enough to folks that don't visit the gentoo forums to list here.

The owner's, baeksu, description.

My MiniSlack Memoirs

I knew when I published my MiniSlack review that I might get some unkind comments, and I thought I was prepared. By the end of the day I guess I wasn't. I thought one poster was going to be helpful and constructive, but his final post drove me to disable comments and delete the posts made. I received a private message from one gentleman who may have been disappointed by my results, but at least he was respectful, professional, and helpful. He has provoked this commentary.

One Fine Trick

Those cute Southpark icons on the right of his desktop represent folks in his instant messenger list. They change coloration to indicate their online status. Ain't that the neato-ist thing?

Recent Review Rounds

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I've had some successes and not so successful adventures. I got stampeded by Buffalo, a distro whose name intrigued me. I didn't achieve any yingyang with Zen, whose logo was so darn cute. And my fruit went sour with Berry, whose motif was quite appetizing.

My latest efforts are with Lunar. After I finally discovered the commands Lunar uses to install software, I was on my way. I didn't tweak any compile flags or set up distcc, but it's still kinda neato to watch it compile up your applications from scratch. I don't think Lunar is for everyone, as it's taken a little coaxing at times, but i got xorg and the kde desktop installed and running, as well as xawtv!


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Site News

Sorry for the downtime, it's been a rough day. Not only was my Symphony story getting a lot of play, but I was also the subject of ddos attacks on the site and my mail server. It seems to have subsided some now, and I'm back up. I do apologize.

I been Buffalo'd

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Buffalo Linux 1.7.3 was released on May 10 and it sounded quite interesting. I'd visted their website a couple times in the past but never installed this oddly named distro. Now with the site up and running I thought the time was right.

DOOM: The Movie update

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Arrrgs. I go to gamespy just about everyday but somehow I missed this cool Doom3 movie update. It sounds pretty cool. They even have some great stills! It looks like it's gonna be exciting - I am excited - I can hardly wait.

The Site: first quarter report

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Site News

Today marks the anniversary of my first quarter year actually getting hits. I started a little website last July actually, but I started getting some reads when I installed drupal then began posting a few links to stories on Feb. 04 and finally posted my first original article on Feb. 08.

We have since grown to over 100,000 hits last month. I hope to continue to grow as I learn what the audience wants to read. My hopes also include promoting Linux and helping the world see the advantages of oss while having lots of fun in the process. Because to me, that's the biggest advantage of running Linux - it's just plain fun.

Heyyyy, /My/ Screenshots on Ebay!?

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What's up with that!? Someone scarfed some of my screenshots to help sell cheap home-made Mandriva dvds. Think I should get some royalties? Big Grin Oh well, least he linked to my review. That Ebay link.

May Enlightenment

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Just talk

I installed kde cvs a week or so back after posting my Month with Fluxbox - Part 2, yet I always seemed to choose fluxbox when it came time to log into X. I very much enjoyed running fluxbox, but I'm gonna run enlightment during May and see how it goes.

Preview 9 Delayed

I have all the packages updated that I want to go into Preview 9 but the mklivecd scripts need a small update for the hardware detection for monitors and setting the screen resolution. Unfortunately no one is available from the mklivecd development team at this time to take a peek at the perl code which really puts a kink in getting Preview 9 out the door.

A teehee

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In reply during a conversation with a good friend, I received this funny with the line, "yeah, but did you have to post about it?" lol He's a nutcase!

A Month With Fluxbox - Part 2

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My month with Fluxbox can almost be officially over and it's time to report on my experiences as promised. I wish I had a long list of complaints to file or problems for which I had to find answers or even less than compelling reasons to run back to KDE (i.e. something interesting or controversial to write about). But the truth is, it sat back there serving up my windows and never once gave me reason to even notice it was there. And that's a good thing.

General Hardware Tips

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I saw this thread in the gentoo forums with some wonderful information for folks experiencing hardware failures or inconsistencies, boot failures, or data loss and the ilk. I think it might be helpful to some, so I thought I'd post a link to it.


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More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

Leftovers: KDE


  • 4 Useful Cinnamon Desktop Applets
    The Cinnamon desktop environment is incredibly popular, and for good reason. Out of the box it offers a clean, fast and well configured desktop experience. But that doesn’t mean that you can’t make it a little better with a few nifty extras. And that’s where Cinnamon Applets come in. Like Unity’s Indicator Applets and GNOME Extensions, Cinnamon Applets let you add additional functionality to your desktop quickly and easily.
  • GNOME Core Apps Hackfest
    The hackfest is aimed to raise the standard of the overall core experience in GNOME, this includes the core apps like Documents, Files, Music, Photos and Videos, etc. In particular, we want to identify missing features and sore points that needs to be addressed and the interaction between apps and the desktop. Making the core apps push beyond the limits of the framework and making them excellent will not only be helpful for the GNOME desktop experience, but also for 3rd party apps, where we will implement what they are missing and also serve as an example of what an app could be.
  • This Week in GTK+ – 21
    In this last week, the master branch of GTK+ has seen 335 commits, with 13631 lines added and 37699 lines removed.

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

  • Puppet Unveils New Docker Build and Phased Deployments
    Puppet released a number of announcements today including the availability of Puppet Docker Image Build and a new version of Puppet Enterprise, which features phased deployments and situational awareness. In April, Puppet began helping people deploy and manage things like Docker, Kubernetes, Mesosphere, and CoreOS. Now the shift is helping people manage the services that are running on top of those environments.
  • 9 reasons not to install Nagios in your company
  • Top 5 Reasons to Love Kubernetes
    At LinuxCon Europe in Berlin I gave a talk about Kubernetes titled "Why I love Kubernetes? Top 10 reasons." The response was great, and several folks asked me to write a blog about it. So here it is, with the first five reasons in this article and the others to follow. As a quick introduction, Kubernetes is "an open-source system for automating deployment, scaling and management of containerized applications" often referred to as a container orchestrator.
  • Website-blocking attack used open-source software
    Mirai gained notoriety after the Krebs attack because of the bandwidth it was able to generate — a record at well over 600 gigabits a second, enough to send the English text of Wikipedia three times in two seconds. Two weeks later, the source code for Mirai was posted online for free.
  • Alibaba’s Blockchain Email Repository Gains Technology from Chinese Open Source Startup
    Onchain, an open-source blockchain based in Shanghai, will provide technology for Alibaba’s first blockchain supported email evidence repository. Onchain allows fast re-constructions for public, permissioned (consortium) or private blockchains and will eventually enable interoperability among these modes. Its consortium chain product, the Law Chain, will provide technology for Ali Cloud, Alibaba’s computing branch. Ali Cloud has integrated Onchain’s Antshares blockchain technology to provide an enterprise-grade email repository. Onchain provides the bottom-layer framework for Ali Cloud, including its open-source blockchain capabilities, to enable any company to customize its own enterprise-level blockchain.
  • Netflix on Firefox for Linux
    If you're a Firefox user and you're a little fed up with going to Google Chrome every time in order to watch Netflix on your Linux machine, the good news is since Firefox 49 landed, HTML5 DRM (through the Google Widevine CDM (Content Decryption Manager) plugin) is now supported. Services that use DRM for HTML5 media should now just work, such as Amazon Prime Video. Unfortunately, the Netflix crew haven't 'flicked a switch' yet behind the scenes for Firefox on Linux, meaning if you run Netflix in the Mozilla browser at the moment, you'll likely just come across the old Silverlight error page. But there is a workaround. For some reason, Netflix still expects Silverlight when it detects the user is running Firefox, despite the fact that the latest Firefox builds for Linux now support the HTML5 DRM plugin.
  • IBM Power Systems solution for EnterpriseDB Postgres Advanced Server
    The primary focus of this article is on the use, configuration, and optimization of PostgreSQL and EnterpriseDB Postgres Advanced Server running on the IBM® Power Systems™ servers featuring the new IBM POWER8® processor technology. Note: The Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) 7.2 operating system was used. The scope of this article is to provide information on how to build and set up of PostgreSQL database from open source and also install and configure EnterpriseDB Postgres Advanced Server on an IBM Power® server for better use. EnterpriseDB Postgres Advanced Server on IBM Power Systems running Linux® is based on the open source database, PostgreSQL, and is capable of handling a wide variety of high-transaction and heavy-reporting workloads.
  • Valgrind 3.12 Released With More Improvements For Memory Debugging/Checking
  • [Valgrind] Release 3.12.0 (20 October 2016)
  • Chain Launches Open Source Developer Platform [Ed: If it’s openwashing, then no doubt Microsoft is involved]
  • LLVM Still Looking At Migration To GitHub
    For the past number of months the LLVM project has been considering a move from their SVN-based development process to Git with a focus on GitHub. That effort continues moving forward.
  • Lumina Desktop 1.1 Released With File Manager Improvements
    Lumina is a lightweight Qt-based desktop environment for BSD and Linux. We show you what's new in its latest release, and how you can install it on Ubuntu.
  • Study: Administrations unaware of IT vendor lock-in
    Public policy makers in Sweden have limited insight on how IT project can lead to IT vendor lock-in, a study conducted for the Swedish Competition Authority shows. “An overwhelming majority of the IT projects conducted by schools and public sector organisations refer to specific software without considering lock-in and different possible negative consequences”, the authors conclude.
  • How open access content helps fuel growth in Indian-language Wikipedias
    Mobile Internet connectivity is growing rapidly in rural India, and because most Internet users are more comfortable in their native languages, websites producing content in Indian languages are going to drive this growth. In a country like India in which only a handful of journals are available in Indian languages, open access to research and educational resources is hugely important for populating content for the various Indian language Wikipedias.
  • Where to find the world's best programmers
    One source of data about programmers' skills is HackerRank, a company that poses programming challenges to a community of more than a million coders and also offers recruitment services to businesses. Using information about how successful coders from different countries are at solving problems across a wide range of domains (such as "algorithms" or "data structures" or specific languages such as C++ or Java), HackerRank's data suggests that, overall, the best developers come from China, followed closely by Russia. Alarmingly, and perhaps unexpectedly, the United States comes in at 28th place.