Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Blogs

DOOM: The Movie update

Filed under
News

Arrrgs. I go to gamespy just about everyday but somehow I missed this cool Doom3 movie update. It sounds pretty cool. They even have some great stills! It looks like it's gonna be exciting - I am excited - I can hardly wait.

The Site: first quarter report

Filed under
Site News

Today marks the anniversary of my first quarter year actually getting hits. I started a little website last July actually, but I started getting some reads when I installed drupal then began posting a few links to stories on Feb. 04 and finally posted my first original article on Feb. 08.

We have since grown to over 100,000 hits last month. I hope to continue to grow as I learn what the audience wants to read. My hopes also include promoting Linux and helping the world see the advantages of oss while having lots of fun in the process. Because to me, that's the biggest advantage of running Linux - it's just plain fun.

Heyyyy, /My/ Screenshots on Ebay!?

Filed under
Humor

What's up with that!? Someone scarfed some of my screenshots to help sell cheap home-made Mandriva dvds. Think I should get some royalties? Big Grin Oh well, least he linked to my review. That Ebay link.

May Enlightenment

Filed under
Just talk

I installed kde cvs a week or so back after posting my Month with Fluxbox - Part 2, yet I always seemed to choose fluxbox when it came time to log into X. I very much enjoyed running fluxbox, but I'm gonna run enlightment during May and see how it goes.

Preview 9 Delayed

I have all the packages updated that I want to go into Preview 9 but the mklivecd scripts need a small update for the hardware detection for monitors and setting the screen resolution. Unfortunately no one is available from the mklivecd development team at this time to take a peek at the perl code which really puts a kink in getting Preview 9 out the door.

A teehee

Filed under
Humor

In reply during a conversation with a good friend, I received this funny with the line, "yeah, but did you have to post about it?" lol He's a nutcase!

A Month With Fluxbox - Part 2

Filed under
Reviews

My month with Fluxbox can almost be officially over and it's time to report on my experiences as promised. I wish I had a long list of complaints to file or problems for which I had to find answers or even less than compelling reasons to run back to KDE (i.e. something interesting or controversial to write about). But the truth is, it sat back there serving up my windows and never once gave me reason to even notice it was there. And that's a good thing.

General Hardware Tips

Filed under
Howtos

I saw this thread in the gentoo forums with some wonderful information for folks experiencing hardware failures or inconsistencies, boot failures, or data loss and the ilk. I think it might be helpful to some, so I thought I'd post a link to it.

Thread.

RoE Will Soon Come to Linux

I read from a link of a link today that Doom: Resurrection of Evil will be supported on Linux come Doom 3 patch 1.3. Big Grin yippee.

Almost time.

I've just about got everything ready to cut another iso. Ocilent is going to work up a new oci5 kernel using a different kernel scheduler so that usb hd drives can be booted. Ikrekes sent me a patch to the livecd-install to properly create the initrd for usb hd boot support. I plan on testing this today.


I ported drakxtools and a new drakconf from Mandriva and it seems to be working good. Scott Greeding will be back in 4-5 days and will help me get synaptic in, the menu structure better intergrated and a more sane layout.


Mozilla-Firefox was updated today to version 1.0.3. Im hoping it will fix dialup users problems with dns. I cant reproduce the problem so it is hard to fix something that isnt broken

Printer Updates

I updated some more of the printer rpms today. I found the gimp-print rpms have many of the missing printer drivers and also a minor bug fix to hplip rpms so hopefully these new printer rpms will finally fix everyones printer problems. I also updated kdelibs-3.4.0-7tex rpms to fix a security problem that was posted here on tuxmachines yesterday. Jrangles and Ocilent sent me some kdm login manager themes which I need to check into.

TheDarb got the premium server up and running and I just rsync'd everything up that was posted today. I will start emailing users who donated funds tomorrow after a few tests of the server.

Kernel updated 2.6.11-oci4

Yesterday I got to experience Ocilent's world. We had a problem with the oci3 kernel where if a user yanked out his usbkey without unmounting it the desktop would crash. I spent all of yesterday evening trying different config options and finally found a fix. I must have built 20 kernels until I hit the magic fix which turned out to be the preemption option that was affecting the usb port. Go figure. Anyway I have a new respect for kernel developers. I think I'm gonna stick with packaging from now on!

Neato Pic

Filed under
Just talk

My sister sent me this Kincaid gif this morning. I thought it was kinda neato so I figured I'd share. It don't have anything to do with anything, but...

Performance Tweaks & Tips

Filed under
Howtos

Has your system seemed to have slowed down lately or perhaps it never performed the way you thought it should. Do you ever exclaim, seems my friend's computer is much faster than mine... or the dreaded, my XP is faster than linux? Bite your tongue and check out a few things on your gentoo install.

I don my asbestos house robe and share a few things I've learned from my time with gentoo. Actually these principals can be applied to any linux installation, but I had gentoo in mind when writing them.

New Logo

Filed under
Site News

Just wanted to post a big THANK YOU to jrangels for donating his time and wonderful talent to make us a great new logo and header background image here at tuxmachines.org. You might know his work from being offered on kde-look.org or from being the primary graphic artist for pclinuxos. His newest work for that distro is on display in the tuxgallery. Mosey on by and take a look before you leave.

Thanks again Jose.

Mini Distro Round-Up

Filed under
Reviews

Distributions that can fit on a mini-cd are today's answer to the floppy distros of yesteryear. Those floppy distros were so handy for those quick repairs, setting up a filesystem on a new harddrive, or just killing a Saturday night. Nothing like the satisfaction of overcoming the difficulties getting MuLinux to dial up to the internet or even boot into a mini X. Hal was my favorite though. I still have my Hal floppy. They were just plain fun!

Today we have our mini-distros too, some as small as 50MB. There isn't much of a challenge these days though, just boot and go. With a weekend off from work, I thought I'd get reacquainted with an old friend and hopefully make some new ones. I test drove 5 of the smallest distros I could find and I'll tell you what I discovered.

gentoo's april fools

Filed under
Humor

Gentoo's April Fools Joke? Imagine my surprize when I logged into the gentoo forum and saw this! I actually kinda like it, if you forget how hard it is to read. I have to get like 6 inches from the monitor. Big Grin Well, there's a bit of a discussion whether this is actually a real theme or just a joke. hmmm. Big Grin

A Month With Fluxbox - Part 1

Filed under
Howtos

In anticipation of the April Gentoo Monthly Screenshots thread on my favorite forum, I've been working on beautifying my desktop for the last several days.

I've used KDE forever it seems, but this month I wanted to post something a little different. And in keeping with the spirit of the thread, I'm going to run fluxbox all April long and post my thoughts on using it here at tuxmachines at the end. Today I'd like to share of the things I've done so far to "purty it up".

Diversity in PC cases

Filed under
Humor

I saw this thread on gentoo forum about cardboard pc cases and thought I'd pass along some of the fun.

Re-install

Filed under
News

Well I messed around this afternoon and managed to totally break my menus so after messing around for a few hours, I backed everything up and did a new install of Preview 81a then updated everything including unstable. I total of 211 packages and Im back in business. I still need to copy my backup stuff back over but man everything is running so much better. I had been using this partition since I converted it from Mandrake 9.2 to PCLinuxOS preview 4 and been updating all this time. So all in all something good came out of something bad. Everything is snappy again. I'll probably be moving everything from unstable tomorrow into updates. I didnt run into any conflicts updating my p81a install from unstable so I'll get to rocking with new packages again.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

OpenSUSE fonts – The sleeping beauty guide

Pandora’s box of fonts is one of the many ailments of the distro world. As long as we do not have standards, and some rather strict ones at that, we will continue to suffer from bad fonts, bad contrast, bad ergonomics, and in general, settings that are not designed for sustained, prolonged use. It’s a shame, because humans actually use computers to interface with information, to READ text and interpret knowledge using the power of language. It’s the most critical element of the whole thing. OpenSUSE under-delivers on two fonts – anti-aliasing and hinting options that are less than ideal, and then it lacks the necessary font libraries to make a relevant, modern and pleasing desktop for general use. All of this can be easily solved if there’s more attention, love and passion for the end product. After all, don’t you want people to be spending a lot of time interacting, using and enjoying the distro? Hopefully, one day, all this will be ancient history. We will be able to choose any which system and never worry or wonder how our experience is going to be impacted by the choice of drivers, monitors, software frameworks, or even where we live. For the time being, if you intend on using openSUSE, this little guide should help you achieve a better, smoother, higher-quality rendering of fonts on the screen, allowing you to enjoy the truly neat Plasma desktop to the fullest. Oh, in the openSUSE review, I promised we would handle this, and handle it we did! Take care. Read more

Today in Techrights

Direct Rendering Manager and VR HMDs Under Linux

  • Intel Prepping Support For Huge GTT Pages
    Intel OTC developers are working on support for huge GTT pages for their Direct Rendering Manager driver.
  • Keith Packard's Work On Better Supporting VR HMDs Under Linux With X.Org/DRM
    Earlier this year Keith Packard started a contract gig for Valve working to improve Linux's support for virtual reality head-mounted displays (VR HMDs). In particular, working on Direct Rendering Manager (DRM) and X.Org changes needed so VR HMDs will work well under Linux with the non-NVIDIA drivers. A big part of this work is the concept of DRM leases, a new Vulkan extension, and other changes to the stack.

Software: Security Tools, cmus, Atom-IDE, Skimmer Scanner

  • Security Tools to Check for Viruses and Malware on Linux
    First and foremost, no operating system is 100 percent immune to attack. Whether a machine is online or offline, it can fall victim to malicious code. Although Linux is less prone to such attacks than, say, Windows, there is no absolute when it comes to security. I have witnessed, first hand, Linux servers hit by rootkits that were so nasty, the only solution was to reinstall and hope the data backup was current. I’ve been a victim of a (very brief) hacker getting onto my desktop, because I accidentally left desktop sharing running (that was certainly an eye opener). The lesson? Even Linux can be vulnerable. So why does Linux need tools to prevent viruses, malware, and rootkits? It should be obvious why every server needs protection from rootkits — because once you are hit with a rootkit, all bets are off as to whether you can recover without reinstalling the platform. It’s antivirus and anti-malware where admins start getting a bit confused. Let me put it simply — if your server (or desktop for that matter) makes use of Samba or sshfs (or any other sharing means), those files will be opened by users running operating systems that are vulnerable. Do you really want to take the chance that your Samba share directory could be dishing out files that contain malicious code? If that should happen, your job becomes exponentially more difficult. Similarly, if that Linux machine performs as a mail server, you would be remiss to not include AV scanning (lest your users be forwarding malicious mail).
  • cmus – A Small, Fast And Powerful Console Music Player For Linux
    You may ask a question yourself when you see this article. Is it possible to listen music in Linux terminal? Yes because nothing is impossible in Linux. We have covered many popular GUI-based media players in our previous articles but we didn’t cover any CLI based media players as of now, so today we are going to cover about cmus, is one of the famous console-based media players among others (For CLI, very few applications is available in Linux).
  • You Can Now Transform the Atom Hackable Text Editor into an IDE with Atom-IDE
    GitHub and Facebook recently launched a set of tools that promise to allow you to transform your Atom hackable text editor into a veritable IDE (Integrated Development Environment). They call the project Atom-IDE. With the release of Atom 1.21 Beta last week, GitHub introduced Language Server Protocol support to integrate its brand-new Atom-IDE project, which comes with built-in support for five popular language servers, including JavaScript, TypeScript, PHP, Java, C#, and Flow. But many others will come with future Atom updates.
  • This open-source Android app is designed to detect nearby credit card skimmers
    Protecting our data is a constant battle, especially as technology continues to advance. A recent trend that has popped up is the installation of credit card skimmers, especially at locations such as gas pumps. With a simple piece of hardware and 30 seconds to install it, a hacker can easily steal credit card numbers from a gas pump without anyone knowing. Now, an open-source app for Android is attempting to help users avoid these skimmers.