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This is where mobile technology is headed, it’s great.. Especially for "Nix

Filed under
Linux

We know the mobile phone is where it is at, we also know the cloud is the glue which binds all our devices, what if this didn’t have to be the case? The cloud is great when you are tethered to your Wifi or a mobile signal, great if you work in a big city with lots of Wifi hotspots or mobile coverage. Not so good when the office blocks access to it because of security risks, or you live in a 3G blackspot.

Exploring Strange New Worlds...

Filed under
Just talk

I've seen it discussed before, but it sometimes doesn't really hit me until I see where someone who is talking around it, completely misses it.

Of course, I'm talking about the Star Trek influence. How close are we to realizing Star Trek Technology?

Personal Computing on the fly

Filed under
Linux

The cloud. It's the talk of the town and has been growing for awhile now.

LibreOffice 3.6 is ready for us.

I know, I know, it is best to install your apps only through your Linux distribution's repository.
However, since LibreOffice 3.6 is faster loading and comes some nice new features spread throughout the Suite, this may be the time NOT to wait.

Why Ubuntu, not Ubuntu Linux will be the future of next Gen OS’s

Filed under
Linux

Ubuntu Linke Android is based on a Linux Kernel, it has a Linux command line, it runs Linux applications however if Ubuntu is to become a serious third contender in the Operating space it needs to drop the word Linux.

How Ubuntu can save the Linux Desktop

Filed under
Linux

Having already written on why I believe the Linux desktop has had it’s day and admitting that while Linux has changed the world of IT for the better it seems that after comment’s from some very notable industry players over the last week might have sparked an interested in Linux, specifically Ubuntu as a viable third alternative.

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5 tech item’s i’ve owned over the years…

Filed under
Just talk

I’ve owned a lot of things from the tech industry over the years however some item’s do stand out more than others as being very special. I’ve been a tech geek for a long time and some of this stuff is old, however it’s all here for a reason.

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What First Got You Interested in Technology?

Filed under
Just talk

I’ve been reading a post on Gizmodo.com which features interviews with People like Steve Wozniak and Alexis Ohanian who have shared what pushed them into this field. Last night, at the American Museum of Natural History, Neil de Grasse Tyson told us what got him hooked on space exploration.

This got me thinking what was it that got me interested in Technology.

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5 Ways Linux has Changed the World

Filed under
Linux

While i still stand firm that the day of Desktop Linux has passed, there is no doubt that from its humble beginnings this open operating system not only changed the direction of IT, but have changed the world.

Video Calls on the move.. lots of choices many questions.

Filed under
Just talk

The idea of the video phone has been around for a very long time. I remember attending a phone conference in the 90′s when it was the next big thing. However it has never really taken off.. maybe until now?

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Followup up to the comments on "Has the Linux Desktop had its day" post..

Filed under
Linux

Yesterday i wrote a post entitled “Has Linux on the Desktop had its day” and it got some responses. It’s not my place to name names however I do feel some of the responses I had in the post are a clear example of some of the problems with the Linux Community.

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Has linux had its day on the desktop?

The stats are in, Linux is everywhere, the problem is, no one is mentioning this fact, and at the same time it appears that take up of the Linux desktop may be on the wane. Its a strange new world which this operating system now finds itself powering huge chunks of the internet and mobile devices. Yet evidently losing ground on the desktop.

Remote Application launching using X11 and SSH.. Oldie but a goodie..

Filed under
Howtos

Using WordPress as my central blog platform I’m very happy with it, not much to complain about, some good features, it’s very social and some nice themes. However it’s got me thinking not so much my content i’m now having a “problem” to manage it’s dealing with the replies

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How to custmize KDE’s window titlebar buttons

Filed under
Linux

If you are using the latest KDE edition of your favorite distribution, your window titlebar could be missing a button or two that you most certainly need. That is definitely the case on Sabayon 9 KDE. The titlebar could also be sporting spacers that you do not need, as is the case on Kubuntu 12.04.

KLook gets PDF/ODT support, while StackFolder gets drag-n-drop

Filed under
Linux

KLook is a multi-file-type viewer. It is not an application that can be started standalone, but is integrated into other applications, like Dolphin, KDE’s file manager. StackFolder, on the other hand, is a widget application that makes it possible to browse the contents of a directory, or your entire home folder, without opening Dolphin.

Help with Hardware Guess?

Well, I hoped the hardware issue of earlier was just a scare, but apparently not. Now my machine locked up while idling. What do you think, motherboard?

Help with Kmail 4.8 storage

Filed under
Linux

Since I imported my mail into kmail 4.8.3, my old Mail folders haven't been updated. Where the heck is my mail stored?

Pandora FMS 4.0.2 released!

Filed under
Reviews

A new version of Pandora FMS http://pandorafms.com is ready! Artica ST http://artica.es has released Pandora FMS 4.0.2 with the aim to improve the tool, keep reliability and improve the performance. In this new version of the IT monitoring several new features were added but the big effort was to fix bugs and improve existing features.

Downloads of Apache OpenOffice 3.4.0 top 5 million

If you just dropped in from outer space, Apache OpenOffice, or what used to be called OpenOffice.org, was a Sun Microsystems-sponsored project. It was at one time, the most popular office suite, as it was pre-installed on almost all Linux and BSD desktop distributions.

Read the complete article at http://www.linuxbsdos.com/2012/06/20/downloads-of-apache-openoffice-3-4-0-top-5-million/

How to make Fedora 17 more user-friendly with easyLife

Filed under
Linux

But there are applications that make it very easy to install most non-free applications on any edition of Fedora. One of those applications is called EasyLife. This article shows the simple steps you need to install it on your Fedora 17-powered box.

Read the complete article at http://www.linuxbsdos.com/2012/06/20/how-to-make-fedora-17-more-user-friendly-with-easylife/

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More in Tux Machines

Operating-System-Directed Power-Management (OSPM) Summit

  • The third Operating-System-Directed Power-Management summit

    he third edition of the Operating-System-Directed Power-Management (OSPM) summit was held May 20-22 at the ReTiS Lab of the Scuola Superiore Sant'Anna in Pisa, Italy. The summit is organized to collaborate on ways to reduce the energy consumption of Linux systems, while still meeting performance and other goals. It is attended by scheduler, power-management, and other kernel developers, as well as academics, industry representatives, and others interested in the topics.

  • The future of SCHED_DEADLINE and SCHED_RT for capacity-constrained and asymmetric-capacity systems

    The kernel's deadline scheduling class (SCHED_DEADLINE) enables realtime scheduling where every task is guaranteed to meet its deadlines. Unfortunately SCHED_DEADLINE's current view on CPU capacity is far too simple. It doesn't take dynamic voltage and frequency scaling (DVFS), simultaneous multithreading (SMT), asymmetric CPU capacity, or any kind of performance capping (e.g. due to thermal constraints) into consideration. In particular, if we consider running deadline tasks in a system with performance capping, the question is "what level of guarantee should SCHED_DEADLINE provide?". An interesting discussion about the pro and cons of different approaches (weak, hard, or mixed guarantees) developed during this presentation. There were many different views but the discussion didn't really conclude and will have to be continued at the Linux Plumbers Conference later this year. The topic of guaranteed performance will become more important for mobile systems in the future as performance capping is likely to become more common. Defining hard guarantees is almost impossible on real systems since silicon behavior very much depends on environmental conditions. The main pushback on the existing scheme is that the guaranteed bandwidth budget might be too conservative. Hence SCHED_DEADLINE might not allow enough bandwidth to be reserved for use cases with higher bandwidth requirements that can tolerate bandwidth reservations not being honored.

  • Scheduler behavioral testing

    Validating scheduler behavior is a tricky affair, as multiple subsystems both compete and cooperate with each other to produce the task placement we observe. Valentin Schneider from Arm described the approach taken by his team (the folks behind energy-aware scheduling — EAS) to tackle this problem.

  • CFS wakeup path and Arm big.LITTLE/DynamIQ

    "One task per CPU" workloads, as emulated by multi-core Geekbench, can suffer on traditional two-cluster big.LITTLE systems due to the fact that tasks finish earlier on the big CPUs. Arm has introduced a more flexible DynamIQ architecture that can combine big and LITTLE CPUs into a single cluster; in this case, early products apply what's known as phantom scheduler domains (PDs). The concept of PDs is needed for DynamIQ so that the task scheduler can use the existing big.LITTLE extensions in the Completely Fair Scheduler (CFS) scheduler class. Multi-core Geekbench consists of several tests during which N CFS tasks perform an equal amount of work. The synchronization mechanism pthread_barrier_wait() (i.e. a futex) is used to wait for all tasks to finish their work in test T before starting the tasks again for test T+1. The problem for Geekbench on big.LITTLE is related to the grouping of big and LITTLE CPUs in separate scheduler (or CPU) groups of the so-called die-level scheduler domain. The two groups exists because the big CPUs share a last-level cache (LLC) and so do the LITTLE CPUs. This isn't true any more for DynamIQ, hence the use of the "phantom" notion here. The tasks of test T finish earlier on big CPUs and go to sleep at the barrier B. Load balancing then makes sure that the tasks on the LITTLE CPUs migrate to the big CPUs where they continue to run the rest of their work in T before they also go to sleep at B. At this moment, all the tasks in the wake queue have a big CPU as their previous CPU (p->prev_cpu). After the last task has entered pthread_barrier_wait() on a big CPU, all tasks on the wake queue are woken up.

  • I-MECH: realtime virtualization for industrial automation

    The typical systems used in industrial automation (e.g. for axis control) consist of a "black box" executing a commercial realtime operating system (RTOS) plus a set of control design tools meant to be run on a different desktop machine. This approach, besides imposing expensive royalties on the system integrator, often does not offer the desired degree of flexibility for testing/implementing novel solutions (e.g., running both control code and design tools on the same platform).

  • Virtual-machine scheduling and scheduling in virtual machines

    As is probably well known, a scheduler is the component of an operating system that decides which CPU the various tasks should run on and for how long they are allowed to do so. This happens when an OS runs on the bare hardware of a physical host and it is also the case when the OS runs inside a virtual machine. The only difference being that, in the latter case, the OS scheduler marshals tasks among virtual CPUs. And what are virtual CPUs? Well, in most platforms they are also a kind of special task and they want to run on some CPUs ... therefore we need a scheduler for that! This is usually called the "double-scheduling" property of systems employing virtualization because, well, there literally are two schedulers: one — let us call it the host scheduler, or the hypervisor scheduler — that schedules the virtual CPUs on the host physical CPUs; and another one — let us call it the guest scheduler — that schedules the guest OS's tasks on the guest's virtual CPUs. Now what are these two schedulers? That depends on the virtualization platform. They are always different, in the sense that it will never happen that, at runtime, a scheduler has to deal with scheduling virtual CPUs and also scheduling tasks that want to run on those same virtual CPUs (well, it can happen, but then you are not doing virtualization). They can be the same, in terms of code, or they can be completely different from that respect as well.

  • Rock and a hard place: How hard it is to be a CPU idle-time governor

    In the opening session of OSPM 2019, Rafael Wysocki from Intel gave a talk about potential problems faced by the designers of CPU idle-time-management governors, which was inspired by his own experience from the timer-events oriented (TEO) governor work done last year. In the first place, he said, it should be noted that "CPU idleness" is defined at the level of logical CPUs, which may be CPU cores or simultaneous multithreading (SMT) threads, depending on the hardware configuration of the processor. In Linux, a logical CPU is idle when there are no runnable tasks in its queue, so it falls back to executing the idle task associated with it (there is one idle task for each logical CPU in the system, but they all share the same code, which is the idle loop). Therefore "CPU idleness" is an OS (not hardware) concept and if the idle loop is entered by a CPU, there is an opportunity to save some energy with a relatively small impact on performance (or even without any impact on performance at all) — if the hardware supports that. The idle loop runs on each idle CPU and it only takes this particular CPU into consideration. As a rule, two code modules are invoked in every iteration of it. The first one, referred to as the CPU idle-time-management governor, is responsible for deciding whether or not to stop the scheduler tick and what to tell the hardware to do; the second one, called the CPU idle-time-management driver, passes the governor's decisions down to the hardware, usually in an architecture- or platform-specific way. Then, presumably, the processor enters a special state in which the CPU in question stops fetching instructions (that is, it does literally nothing at all); that may allow the processor's power draw to be reduced and some energy to be saved as a result. If that happens, the processor needs to be woken up from that state by a hardware event after spending some time, referred to as the idle duration, in it. At that point, the governor is called again so it can save the idle-duration value for future use.

Red Hat/IBM and Fedora Leftovers

  • An introduction to cloud-native CI/CD with Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines

    Red Hat OpenShift 4.1 offers a developer preview of OpenShift Pipelines, which enable the creation of cloud-native, Kubernetes-style continuous integration and continuous delivery (CI/CD) pipelines based on the Tekton project. In a recent article on the Red Hat OpenShift blog, I provided an introduction to Tekton and pipeline concepts and described the benefits and features of OpenShift Pipelines. OpenShift Pipelines builds upon the Tekton project to enable teams to build Kubernetes-style delivery pipelines that they can fully control and own the complete lifecycle of their microservices without having to rely on central teams to maintain and manage a CI server, plugins, and its configurations.

  • IBM's New Open Source Kabanero Promises to Simplify Kubernetes for DevOps

    At OSCON, IBM unveiled a new open source platform that promises to make Kubernetes easier to manage for DevOps teams.

  • MySQL for developers in Red Hat OpenShift

    As a software developer, it’s often necessary to access a relational database—or any type of database, for that matter. If you’ve been held back by that situation where you need to have someone in operations provision a database for you, then this article will set you free. I’ll show you how to spin up (and wipe out) a MySQL database in seconds using Red Hat OpenShift. Truth be told, there are several databases that can be hosted in OpenShift, including Microsoft SQL Server, Couchbase, MongoDB, and more. For this article, we’ll use MySQL. The concepts, however, will be the same for other databases. So, let’s get some knowledge and leverage it.

  • What you need to know to be a sysadmin

    The system administrator of yesteryear jockeyed users and wrangled servers all day, in between mornings and evenings spent running hundreds of meters of hundreds of cables. This is still true today, with the added complexity of cloud computing, containers, and virtual machines. Looking in from the outside, it can be difficult to pinpoint what exactly a sysadmin does, because they play at least a small role in so many places. Nobody goes into a career already knowing everything they need for a job, but everyone needs a strong foundation. If you're looking to start down the path of system administration, here's what you should be concentrating on in your personal or formal training.

  • Building blocks of syslog-ng

    Recently I gave a syslog-ng introductory workshop at Pass the SALT conference in Lille, France. I got a lot of positive feedback, so I decided to turn all that feedback into a blog post. Naturally, I shortened and simplified it, but still managed to get enough material for multiple blog posts.

  • PHP version 7.2.21RC1 and 7.3.8RC1

    Release Candidate versions are available in testing repository for Fedora and Enterprise Linux (RHEL / CentOS) to allow more people to test them. They are available as Software Collections, for a parallel installation, perfect solution for such tests (for x86_64 only), and also as base packages. RPM of PHP version 7.387RC1 are available as SCL in remi-test repository and as base packages in the remi-test repository for Fedora 30 or remi-php73-test repository for Fedora 28-29 and Enterprise Linux. RPM of PHP version 7.2.20RC1 are available as SCL in remi-test repository and as base packages in the remi-test repository for Fedora 28-29 or remi-php72-test repository for Enterprise Linux.

  • QElectroTech version 0.70

    RPM of QElectroTech version 0.70, an application to design electric diagrams, are available in remi for Fedora and Enterprise Linux 7. A bit more than 1 year after the version 0.60 release, the project have just released a new major version of their electric diagrams editor.

Endeavour OS 2019.07.15

Today we are looking at the first stable release of Endeavour OS. It is a project that started to continue the spirit of the recently discontinued Antergos. The developing team exists out of Antergos developers and community members. As you can see in this first stable release, it is far from just a continuing of Antergos as we know it. The stable release is an offline Calamres installer and it just came with a customized XFCE desktop environment. They are planning to have an online installer again in the future, which will give a person an option to choose between 10 desktop environments, similar to Antergos. It is based on Arch, Linux Kernel 5.2, XFCE 4.14 pre2 and it uses about 500mb of ram. Read more Direct/video: Endeavour OS 2019.07.15 Run Through

Linux File Manager: Top 20 Reviewed for Linux Users

A file manager is the most used software in any digital platform. With the help of this software, you can access, manage, and decorate the files on your device. For the Linux system, this is also an important factor to have an effective and simple file manager. In this curated article, we are going to discuss a set of best Linux file manager tools which definitely help you to operate the system effectively. Read more