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Restore the Windows bootloader to MBR after dual-booting with Linux

Filed under
Linux

If you installed the Linux boot loader to the MBR and want to restore the Windows boot loader, this short tutorial shows you how to do it. It is an easy, point-and-click process. And the application that makes it that easy is called EasyBCD, a free-for-personal-use application from Neosmart Technologies.

If Tablets are the way forward why is it so dammed hard to get one on contract?

Filed under
Just talk

Directly on the various Mobile operator sites there seems to be a choice of the iPad 2 going very strong 1 week before the new Ipad release, very little mention of "the new iPad coming soon" and either the Samsung Galaxy 10.1 or Orange are offering their own Tablet or th HTC 7" offering.

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4 Linux and a BSD Distro every Sysadmin should have in their toolbox

Filed under
Linux

While as a Sysadmin our world is generally speaking goverend by Windows Desktops and servers, Microsoft's OS isn't the best one out there at every task, for some tasks Linux is the answer, I've written on other blogs on a similar topic, about Linux Distros and which ones you will get he most out of. The idea behind most of these Linux Distros is they act as a tool or a set of tools to perform a certain task.
Each one of thses distros is free, downloads as an ISO and can be run (apart from one) booted from a CD without installation.

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How to dual-boot Windows 7 and Chakra Linux Archimedes, with shared NTFS partition at the end

Filed under
Linux

The broad objective, if it is not already evident from the title of this article, is to: Dual-boot Windows 7 and Chakra Archimedes on a computer with one hard drive; then, create an NTFS partition at the end of the drive that will be shared between both operating systems. When completed, you should see this screen when you reboot or restart the computer.

BackTrack 5 Revolution 2 screen shot

One of those, is BackTrack, a hackers delight, one that is loaded with all the best Free Software and Open Source penetration testing applications available. The latest edition is BackTrack 5, code-named Revolution. We are actually at BackTrack 5 R2. Keep in mind that BackTrack is not a distribution for newbies. This is serious stuff.

How to install and configure Gufw on Linux Deepin 11.12.1

Filed under
Linux

A new installation of Linux Deepin 11.12.1 does not have any of the network security applications that you find on Ubuntu enabled: A default installation of Linux Deepin 11.12.1, the latest edition, will leave your computer wide open for the bad guys to mess with.

Linux Deepin 11.12.1 review

Filed under
Linux

Linux Deepin is a desktop distribution based on Ubuntu Desktop, but using a modifed GNOME 3 shell, not Ubuntu’s Unity desktop. It was founded by Liu Wenhuan, who is also a co-founder of Wuhan Linux User Group (LUG), a LUG in Wuhan, the capital of Hubei province, China.

He can steal your smart phone’s and tablet’s encryption keys

Filed under
News

If you think that the encryption keys that your smart phone or tablet computer uses to protect data you want to keep others from accessing is secure, well … think again.

Crypto researchers have demonstrated that those encryption keys can be stolen using techniques that are not that difficult to assemble.

SalineOS 1.6 review

Filed under
Linux

SalineOS is a desktop Linux distribution based on Debian and uses the Xfce desktop environment. The first version reviewed on this website was SalineOS 1.1, and that was back in February 2011 . There has been several versions published since then – SalineOS 1.2, 1.3, 1.4 and 1.5. This article is a review of the latest version, SalineOS 1.6, which was released on February 1 2011.

Linux Deepin 11.12.1 screen shots

Filed under
Linux

Though I tend to stay away from publicly reviewing distributions that use the default GNOME 3 desktop, I evaluate them privately and if I come across one that has been modified to look like a true desktop operating system, then I will take the time to do what it takes to publish a review on it. Linux Deepin falls into that category. So expect a review of Linux Deepin soon.

Kubuntu 12.04 Precise Pangolin beta 1 screen shots

Filed under
Linux

Yet another screen shot post on yet another pre-stable release distribution. This time, it is from Kubuntu 12.04 beta 1, the first beta release of what will become Kubuntu 12.04 LTS (Long Term Support).

Ubuntu 12.04 Precise Pangolin beta 1 screen shots

Filed under
Linux

The first beta version of what will become Ubuntu 12.04, Precise Pangolin, has just been released. The final, stable version will be released by the end of April. This beta release, as with all pre-stable distribution releases, is an invitation for bug hunters to get busy.

Top 10 enterprise-grade features to expect in Fedora 17

Filed under
Linux

This article lists the top ten features that will appeal primarily to enterprise users. Keep in mind that most of them have not been fully implemented in Fedora 17 alpha, the first public release of what would become Fedora 17.

The features in alphabetical order, are:

Read the complete article at http://www.linuxbsdos.com/2012/03/01/top-10-enterprise-grade-features-to-expect-in-fedora-17/

Top features for desktop users of Fedora 17

Filed under
Linux

Like previous editions of Fedora, Fedora 17 will ship with several major feature enhancements. Some will be of interest only to enterprise users, while others will be mainly for desktop users. Other features will, of course, appeal to the needs of both enterprise and desktop users.

Ubuntu 11.10 as an alternative to OSX on the Macbook Pro

Filed under
Linux

For those users not enamoured by the direction OSX is taking or if you are looking to run a free Opensource alternative there are a couple of choices in the Linux camp. I've covered Sabayon and in this article I take a look at just how easy is it to install Ubuntu on a Macbook Pro as the Only OS.

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Consoles of yesteryear..

Filed under
Just talk

The handheld console unit may very soon become a thing of the past and with games costing upwards of £50 their big brothers the home console unit may not be far behind. It's however pretty safe to say that the future of portable gaming on mobile phones hosting IOS and Android does have a very lucrative future.

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A week with Sabayon on the Macbook Pro

Filed under
Linux

Last week after being desperatly disappointed with the direction Apple are taking with OSX after using Mountain Lion for a ew hour i decided to go back to using Linux. However finding the right Linux distro was important, the Macbook Pro (MBP) is not a PC, yes it will run almost every Intel based linux distro there are a few hardware gotchas which make the choice of Distro important for the quickest out of the box up and working experience.

As the title suggests a platform i'm already enamoured with was my first choice, the Gentoo based source and binary distro Sabayon with its recently updated version 8.

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A phone, a Dock, a thin Client.. Thanks Ubuntu..

Filed under
Linux

A while ago I suggested that Ubuntu were all out of Ideas, turns out they are not, they are full of them. Well after Ubuntu TV, here is a new Idea. Android Phone, a Dock, Ubuntu Desktop, Seamless integration.

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Moving to Linux on a Macbook PRo

Filed under
Linux

the announcement of Mountain Lion is the Vista moment for Apple, it's that point when many Apple users will take time to step back and think about the Operating system on their Apple PC.

Windows 8 will be one option However Linux has become a very stable OS when done right on Apple hardware. However it takes a big step and a leap of faith to drop OSX..

Take the First Step

Observations of a Egotistical Technical Elitist

Filed under
Humor

Lets be honest, the title alone sets the tone of this post, so please no comments stating i'm an elitist snob, because this i'm am keenly aware of. However a touch of honesty now and again does tend to go a long way.

So what's the problem? Well there are more than one and they grind me down on a daily basis, so it's time to air them here and these are all tech issues..

So lets start with...

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More in Tux Machines

Security Leftovers

10 hot Android smartphones that got price cuts recently

With numerous smartphone getting launched each month, brands always adjust prices to give slightly competitive edge to older smartphone models and also to clear inventories. Here are 10 smartphones that got price cuts recently. Read more

Debian and Ubuntu News

  • Debian Project News - July 29th, 2016
    Welcome to this year's third issue of DPN, the newsletter for the Debian community.
  • SteamOS Brewmaster 2.87 Released With NVIDIA Pascal Support
  • Snap interfaces for sandboxed applications
    Last week, we took a look at the initial release of the "portal" framework developed for Flatpak, the application-packaging format currently being developed in GNOME. For comparison, we will also explore the corresponding resource-control framework available in the Snap format developed in Ubuntu. The two packaging projects have broadly similar end goals, as many have observed, but they tend to vary quite a bit in the implementation details. Naturally, those differences are of particular importance to the intended audience: application developers. There is some common ground between the projects. Both use some combination of techniques (namespaces, control groups, seccomp filters, etc.) to restrict what a packaged application can do. Moreover, both implement a "deny by default" sandbox, then provide a supplemental means for applications to access certain useful system resources on a restricted or mediated basis. As we will see, there is also some overlap in what interfaces are offered, although the implementations differ. Snap has been available since 2014, so its sandboxing and resource-control implementations have already seen real-world usage. That said, the design of Snap originated in the Ubuntu Touch project aimed at smartphones, so some of its assumptions are undergoing revision as Snap comes to desktop systems. In the Snap framework, the interfaces that are defined to provide access to system resources are called, simply, "interfaces." As we will see, they cover similar territory to the recently unveiled "portals" for Flatpak, but there are some key distinctions. Two classes of Snap interfaces are defined: one for the standard resources expected to be of use to end-user applications, and one designed for use by system utilities. Snap packages using the standard interfaces can be installed with the snap command-line tool (which is the equivalent of apt for .deb packages). Packages using the advanced interfaces require a separate management tool.
  • Ubuntu 15.10 (Wily Werewolf) Reaches End Of Life Today (July 28)
  • Ubuntu MATE 16.10 Yakkety Yak Gets A Unity HUD-Like Searchable Menu
    MATE HUD, a Unity HUD-like tool that allows searching through an application's menu, was recently uploaded to the official Yakkety Yak repositories, and is available (but not enabled) by default in Ubuntu MATE 16.10.

Tablet review: BQ Aquaris M10 Ubuntu Edition

As employees have become more and more flexible in recent years thanks to the power and performance of mobile devices, the way we work has changed dramatically. We frequently chop and change between smartphones, tablets and laptops for different tasks, which has led to the growth of the hybrid market – devices such as Microsoft’s Surface Pro 3 and Apple’s iPad Pro – that provide the power and functionality of a laptop with the mobility and convenience of a tablet. Read more