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Share and discuss anything pertaining to the website.
107 184 5 years 22 weeks ago
by tazammaliqbal
Discussion of or help with installing and running Linux.
Discussion of PCLOS.
12 39 5 years 47 weeks ago
by ariszlo
Debian and derivatives (e.g. Ubuntu)
3 3 5 years 43 weeks ago
by Roy Schestowitz
Gentoo Discussions.
5 6 n/a
Slackware-related (including derivatives) topics
2 11 5 years 43 weeks ago
by Roy Schestowitz
Other Distro Discussions.
46 165 4 years 32 weeks ago
by hussam
Software discussions.
153 266 7 years 4 weeks ago
by geniususer
Hardware discussions.
48 139 5 years 24 weeks ago
by Ayaerlee
Anything Else.
39 126 5 years 43 weeks ago
by vtel57
47 104 5 years 1 week ago
by gfranken

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7 open source Q&A platforms

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