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PCLinuxOS

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Got Space 2 14 years 51 weeks ago
by jmiahman
14 years 50 weeks ago
by Texstar
Is PCLINUXOS a debian distro or another type? 18 13 years 31 weeks ago
by stevenpowers
13 years 4 weeks ago
by dufpatrol
fan control on Sony Laptop 0 12 years 9 weeks ago
by rlboorth
n/a
Lost GUI in PCLinuxOS 1 11 years 48 weeks ago
by cecil0627
11 years 48 weeks ago
by derRainer
Unetbootin 1 11 years 41 weeks ago
by joohn1
6 years 10 weeks ago
by ariszlo
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More in Tux Machines

Nostalgia struck! Aquaris E4.5 & Ubuntu Touch again

I'm happy with my little experiment, even if it serves no higher purpose. Now, on my M10 tablet, I won't repeat the exercise. It's a fairly capable device, and there, Android 6 does a pretty good job - a marked improvement over Android 5 that was on Aquaris E4.5. Indeed, Android has significantly improved over time. But on the phone, OTA-12 works quite well, and offers a fast if limited experience. But for novelty sake, I'm going to take this as far as it goes, either the UBports project or the lifespan of the device. The community-supported continuation of the Ubuntu Phone effort - UBports Ubuntu Touch - is a commendable project. Given its resources, it manages to deliver a fairly robust and fun product, with OTA-12 as its latest incarnation. Solid, usable - to an extent, but also secure, updated and with solid privacy. If you need a basic smartphone, this is a solution that offers a reasonable compromise. I've never really expected to be using Ubuntu Touch again, but now I'm glad I did this, if only to see how far one's passion can stretch. But on a serious, emotionless note, really, if you don't need much, if you're not hooked into social media, and if your hardware supports the OTA-12 image, you might want to give this a try. If anything, it's more mature than it ever was, and in the privacy-focused world, it makes perfect sense. Read more

Sparky 2020.06

The June snapshot of Sparky 2020.06 of the (semi-)rolling line is out. It is based on the Debian testing “Bullseye”. Changes: • system upgrade from Debian testing repos as of June 5, 2020 • Linux kernel 5.6.14 (5.7.0 in Sparky unstable repos) • Firefox 77.0 • Thunderbird 68.8.1 • LibreOffice 6.4.4.2 • debi-tool’ replaced by ‘gdebi’ • added ‘spterm’ (Sparky Terminal) to be used by Sparky tools • Otter Browser replaced by Epiphany Browser (MinimalGUI) • added RadioStation – a fork of RadioTray-Lite (and Radiotray) • added Openbox Noir to the desktop list to be installed as a choice (via MinimalGUI & MinimalCLI and APTus too) • added disk autopartitioning, encrypting and lvm support to the Advanced Installer DEV (still experimental) • Calamares updated up to 3.2.24; changed password strength to a minimum number of digits as possible in Calamares, as requested a few times by our users (can be used used 1 digit, but I recommend to use strong password); thanks to lami07 • added lxappearance to MinimalGUI iso (Openbox) Read more

Which Linux Distro Is Best for Privacy? We’ve Done the Research [Guide]

The code that Linux is built on is open-source software. That means anyone can read or modify the code. While that may sound like a privacy nightmare, it is actually the opposite. Independent programmers from all over the world work on Linux code. That makes it almost impossible for a bad actor to add malicious code to Linux without someone seeing it. Contrast this to proprietary operating systems like Windows or macOS. The proprietary source code is controlled by the company and hidden from outsiders. If you use a proprietary operating system, you have to trust the company. Will they ensure that no malicious code gets added by outsiders? Will they add malicious code themselves? Windows 10, for example, has code in it that records all sorts of information about how you use your computer. Microsoft inserted this code intentionally to gather this information for their own use. In the Linux world, a small army of programmers guards the source code against this kind of behavior. Read more

Android Leftovers