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TopicRepliesCreatedLast replysort icon
Cisco 3750 Switch ASA VPN Routing 0 4 years 1 week ago
by Ayaerlee
n/a
a simple network question 5 10 years 48 weeks ago
by Xarzu
10 years 47 weeks ago
by srlinuxx
impossible mount and unmount cd, dvd and usb pen and hard disk 2 10 years 52 weeks ago
by danilo
10 years 52 weeks ago
by danilo
Wireless Internet Connection 2 11 years 25 weeks ago
by ridgey28
11 years 25 weeks ago
by ridgey28
having a problem installing a driver. 4 12 years 15 weeks ago
by yugiohgx476
12 years 15 weeks ago
by srlinuxx
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Moving Compiler Dependency Checks to Kconfig

One reason became clear recently when Linus Torvalds asked developers to add an entirely new system of dependency checks to the Kconfig language, specifically testing the capabilities of the GCC compiler. It's actually an important issue. The Linux kernel wants to support as many versions of GCC as possible—so long as doing so would not require too much insanity in the kernel code itself—but different versions of GCC support different features. The GCC developers always are tweaking and adjusting, and GCC releases also sometimes have bugs that need to be worked around. Some Linux kernel features can only be built using one version of the compiler or another. And, some features build better or faster if they can take advantage of various GCC features that exist only in certain versions. Up until this year, the kernel build system has had to check all those compiler features by hand, using many hacky methods. The art of probing a tool to find out if it supports a given feature dates back decades and is filled with insanity. Imagine giving a command that you know will fail, but giving it anyway because the specific manner of failure will tell you what you need to know for a future command to work. Now imagine hundreds of hacks like that in the Linux kernel build system. Read more

Fedora be pretty - The ultimate customization guide

I am quite pleased with the final result of this transformation. But it also requires a lot of non-standard changes, which is a shame, because none of what I did, subjective taste elements aside, is super complicated. Imagine a Fedora, or for that any which distro, that has everything really nicely tailored for max. efficiency, ergonomics, productivity, and fun. My journey encompasses the use of third-party repos, extra software, Gnome Tweak Tool, about a dozen extensions, new themes, icons, and fonts, the use of a dock, plus some extra visual polish. In the end, though, Fedora 28 looks and behaves the part. This is something I could happily show to other people, and I am convinced they would be inclined to try it. Well, there you go. The guide. Hopefully, you'll find it useful, and perhaps it may even hype up your enthusiasm for Linux. In these dreary times, an injection of fanboyese is quite needed. Take care. Read more

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