Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Linux

Hackable voice-controlled speaker and IoT controller hits KS

Filed under
Linux
OSS

SeedStudio’s hackable, $49 and up “ReSpeaker” speaker system runs OpenWrt on a Mediatek MT7688 and offers voice control over home appliances.

The ReSpeaker went live on Kickstarter today and has already reached 95 percent of its $40,000 funding goal with 29 days remaining. The device is billed by SeedStudio as an “open source, modular voice interface that allows us to hack things around us, just using our voices.” While it can be used as an Internet media player or a voice-activated IoT hub — especially when integrated with Seeed’s Wio Link IoT board — it’s designed to be paired with individual devices. For example, the campaign’s video shows the ReSpeaker being tucked inside a teddy bear or toy robot, or attached to plant, enabling voice control and voice synthesis. Yes, the plant actually asks to be watered.

Read more

8 Best Linux Distributions For New Linux Users

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

New Linux users are always confused about choosing a best Linux distribution to start with. As there are hundreds of Linux distributions so it might always be a confusing part. But I'll help you choosing the right Linux flavour to start your Linux exploration. In this article, I'll walk you through a list of 8 Best Linux distributions for new Linux users. But before all of that, I suggest you throwing out all the misconceptions about Linux, such as Linux is only for geeks or developers. Linux is for everyone. As I always say, "When Linux can run Google, Facebook, Amazon, it can surely run your home computer as well."

Read<br />
more

Tizen Phones in India

Filed under
Linux
Gadgets

Desktop News

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft
  • Why Google plans to stop supporting your Chromebook after five years

    It’s worth noting that end-of-life doesn’t have to mean the end of useful hardware. If you have the know-how, you can install Linux on your Chromebook to extend its lifespan. Otherwise, users whose Chromebooks are still in fine working order just have to hope that end-of-life notification never comes.

  • EFF slams Microsoft's 'blatant disregard' for user privacy with Windows 10 [Ed: It's textbook definition of malware]

    THE ELECTRONIC FRONTIER FOUNDATION (EFF) has lashed out at Microsoft over the company's "blatant disregard" for user privacy with the pushy, data-slurping Windows 10 operating system.

    Following the launch of a petition in June, EFF has heard from thousands of pissed off people who are asked it to take action against Microsoft, and the privacy campaigners are doing just that. EFF is calling on Microsoft to listen to its users, of which more than 6,000 have signed the online petition, and incorporate their complaints into its operating system.

    "Otherwise, Microsoft may find that it has inadvertently discovered just how far it can push its users before they abandon a once-trusted company for a better, more privacy-protective solution," EFF's Amul Kalia said in a blog post.

    First on EFF’s radar is Microsoft’s backhanded tactics to get people to upgrade to Windows 10, which we here at the INQUIRER know about all too well.

Linux Kernel News

Filed under
Linux
  • Linux Kernel Development Report 2016
  • Celebrating 25 years with Linux

    Linux has become the world’s most popular operating system, and over half of the worldwide device shipments are based on Linux.

    – The Linux kernel was invented at our department. It is definitely the most influential software coming from the Department of Computer Science having significant global impact, says Professor Sasu Tarkoma, head of the department at the University.

    Linus Torvalds, the inventor of the Linux kernel used to study and work at the department and simultaneously work on the kernel. The kernel work started in 1991 and the 1.0 of the operating system was released in 1994.

  • LINUX 25 YEARS
  • How Intel's open source Data Plane Development Kit enables high-performance Linux networking

    Linux is a general purpose operating system. This comment may sound like an obvious statement, but it's sometimes easy to forget. Because it's a general operating system, it is used across a variety of use cases.

    The OS is used in Internet of Things (IoT) devices, smartphones, tablets, servers, and data center appliances. However, it sometimes takes a reminder that using Linux for specialized use cases, such as a network or even network function devices, takes some customization of the kernel or the acceptance that performance may be uneven or limited. The Intel-sponsored open source Data Plane Development Kit (DPDK) project hopes to extend the usefulness of Linux to include high-performance networking devices.

Linux/FOSS Events: LinuxCon, ContainerCon, Software Freedom Day, and More

Filed under
Linux
  • Updates from LinuxCon and ContainerCon, Toronto, August 2016

    The first 25 years of Linux has transformed the world, not just computing, and the next 25 years will continue to see more growth in the Open Source movement, The Linux Foundation Executive Director Jim Zemlin said during the opening keynote of LinuxCon/ContainerCon in Toronto on Monday, August 22, 2016.

    "Linux is the most successful software project in history", Zemlin said, noting that the humble operating sytem created by Linus Torvalds 25 years ago this week is behind much of today's software and devices.

  • 2016 SFD Registration is on!

    The Digital Freedom Foundation is very happy to announce that registration of its thirteenth edition of Software Freedom Day has just opened. While the wiki has been back online for about a week we were still lagging on the registration. Fear no more, it is now fixed and you can all register your events!

  • Advanced Linux System Administration and Networking is designed for IT professionals

    This Course includes some of the course materials, with access to LFS211 Linux operating system and networking and administration for 1 year, also registration includes a printed course manual.

Linux Devices

Filed under
Android
Linux
  • Rugged 3.5-inch SBCs run Linux on Bay Trail and Broadwell

    Perfectron unveiled a pair of 3.5-inch SBCs: one with a quad-core Atom and the other with Broadwell Core SoCs. Both support extended temperatures.

    Perfectron, which recently tapped Intel’s 6th Gen “Skylake” SoCs on its INS8349A Mini-ITX board, has also announced two 3.5-inch form-factor boards with older Intel processors. The OXY5322A is equipped with a quad-core, 1.91GHz Atom E3845 from the 22nm “Bay Trail” generation while the OXY5338A offers a choice of dual-core, 9.5W TDP Core i7-5650U (up to 3.2GHz) and Core i5-5350U (up to 2.90GHz) Broadwell-U CPUs with 14nm fabrication. These same Broadwell processors were supported by Perfectron’s EPIC form-factor OXY5638A SBC from 2015.

  • 5 best new features in Android 7.0 Nougat

    Android 7.0 Nougat is finally here! Well, sort of… Nougat has indeed finally been released to the public, but it’s only available on a handful of Google’s Nexus-branded devices. If you own anything else — and odds are very good that you do — you’re in for a bit of a wait before an Android 7.0 update is made available for your smartphone. Owners of the latest and greatest flagships can likely expect an update to roll out sometime in the next few months, maybe even before the New Year rolls around if you’re lucky.

    The good news, Android fans, is that Android 7.0 Nougat is worth the wait. It might not seem like the new update has much flash and flair on its surface, but the truth is that Android N is a massive update packed full of terrific new features. In this post, we’ll cover the five best additions to Google’s brand new version of Android.

  • Android 7.0 Nougat: 11 tips and tricks

    Google’s latest version of Android is already rolling out to the company’s Nexus and Pixel devices and will begin launching on new smartphones starting with the new LG V20.

    If you’re still waiting, Google is pushing Nougat to those on the Android beta programme first, so if you must have it right now, join the beta quickly to get it updated to the final version of Android 7.0.

  • Yandex applies AI to filter annoying ads on Android, powered by user reports
  • Game: Plants Vs. Zombies Released in the Tizen Store

    Finally the famous game Plants VS Zombies has been released in the Tizen Store. This is an highly addictive game about zombies that are trying to breach your home! You have to plant a variation of 49 plants, that you collect at the end of each level, that fight off the zombies.

Desktop Linux Absent from Zemlin’s LinuxCon Pep Rally

Filed under
GNU
Linux

“As all of you may know, Thursday, August 25 is the 25th anniversary of Linux,” he said during the opening portion of the address. “It’s the day when Linus Torvalds, 25 years ago, sent out his note introducing this funny little operating system that wouldn’t amount to much of anything.”

“Linux at 25 is a big thing,” he added. “Most things in life just don’t last as long and are as enduring as Linux. And Linux has gone so far beyond what anyone who has participated in this community could have ever expected. Linux today really is…the most successful software project in history.”

After this opening, he pointed to the enormity of the Linux project by citing numbers, like its 53,000 source files and 21 million lines of code, and the fact that each day 10,800 lines of code are added to Linux, 5,300 lines of code removed and 1,800 lines of code modified.

“This pace is only accelerating,” he said. “Linux now changes seven [or] eight times an hour. There is no single software project by any single person or organization that rivals the breadth, pace, depth and adoption of Linux. What an incredible run.”

As with any good pep rally, Zemlin gave the fans plenty of reason to be happy to support the home team by pointing to Linux’s wins. Trouble is, all of those wins had to do with making “billions of dollars” — a phrase he used often — for the enterprise.

“Linux has become the world’s most widely adopted software,” he said and rattled off a list of uses that included high performance computing, weather forecasting, climate modeling, economic modeling, mobile devices and embedded systems. “It runs the global economy. Quite literally, it runs the vast majority of stock exchanges. It runs the vast majority of the Internet and powers things like Google, Facebook, Amazon and much, much more.”

Read more

Almost open: BIOS and firmware update tips for Linux users

Filed under
Linux
Red Hat

I suppose I'm lucky in that for more than 10 years my primary work environment has been Linux-based, yet all to often I've been forced to dig out a DOS or Windows image because I need to patch some BIOS device firmware. These days I don't own anything than has a valid Windows license, and even my 2008 white MacBook has spent most of its life running either Ubuntu or Fedora. Luckily most hardware manufacturers have started to provide bootable images for patching system firmware, and for enterprise-grade hardware they even provide Linux-ready tools. In this article, I'll walk through my recent firmware update on Linux, and I'll share a few recommendations based on that experience.

In the consumer/prosumer landscape there has been a shift toward UEFI-based systems for desktops and laptops, and along the way many manufacturers appear to have removed the option for the BIOS to update from a USB Stick. Historically we'd only see firmware updates for enterprise-class spinning rust (hard drives), but many SSD manufacturers are also providing regular firmware updates for consumer-class devices. Whilst we often should stand by the old adage "If it ain't broke, don't fix it," I'm a strong believer when standing up a new environment to make sure all my firmware is current. So begins my journey...

Read more

Also: THE BIG LIE About Operating Systems

Linux Kernel News

Filed under
Linux
Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Android/Google Leftovers

3 open source alternatives to Office 365

It can be hard to get away from working and collaborating on the web. Doing that is incredibly convenient: as long as you have an internet connection, you can easily work and share from just about anywhere, on just about any device. The main problem with most web-based office suites—like Google Drive, Zoho Office, and Office365—is that they're closed source. Your data also exists at the whim of large corporations. I'm sure you've heard numerous stories of, say, Google locking or removing accounts without warning. If that happens to you, you lose what's yours. So what's an open source advocate who wants to work with web applications to do? You turn to an open source alternative, of course. Let's take a look at three of them. Read more

Hackable voice-controlled speaker and IoT controller hits KS

SeedStudio’s hackable, $49 and up “ReSpeaker” speaker system runs OpenWrt on a Mediatek MT7688 and offers voice control over home appliances. The ReSpeaker went live on Kickstarter today and has already reached 95 percent of its $40,000 funding goal with 29 days remaining. The device is billed by SeedStudio as an “open source, modular voice interface that allows us to hack things around us, just using our voices.” While it can be used as an Internet media player or a voice-activated IoT hub — especially when integrated with Seeed’s Wio Link IoT board — it’s designed to be paired with individual devices. For example, the campaign’s video shows the ReSpeaker being tucked inside a teddy bear or toy robot, or attached to plant, enabling voice control and voice synthesis. Yes, the plant actually asks to be watered. Read more

Security News