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LEDE 17.01.0

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Linux

Recent open source hardware trends, from SBCs to servers

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Linux
Hardware

At ELC Europe, Intel MinnowBoard SBC evangelist John Hawley surveyed open hardware trends, and their impact on OS-enabled device and system development.

When you mention open source hardware, people typically think about community-backed hacker boards. However, the open hardware movement is growing on many fronts, including medical devices, rocketry and satellites, 3D printers, cameras, VR gear, and even laptops and servers. At the Embedded Linux Conference Europe in October, John “Warthog9” Hawley, Intel’s evangelist for the MinnowBoard SBC, surveyed the key open hardware trends he saw in 2016. The full video, “Survey of Open Hardware 2016,” can be seen below.

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Also in: Open Source Hardware: From SBCs to Servers

Linux Kernels 4.9.12 & 4.4.51 Now Available with Small Changes, Updated Drivers

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Linux

Greg Kroah-Hartman announced today the general availability of two new maintenance updates for the long-term supported Linux 4.9 and Linux 4.4 kernel updates for Linux-based operating systems.

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New Input Drivers and TinyDRM in Linux 4.11 Kernel

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Linux
  • New Input Drivers For The Linux 4.11 Kernel

    Dmitry Torokhov has submitted the input feature updates for the Linux 4.11 kernel merge window.

    One of the new input drivers for Linux 4.11 is the Zeitech touchscreen controller. The new Zeitec driver is zet6223 and supports the ZET6223 I2C touchscreen controller.

    Another new driver is for Samsung "touchkeys." The Samsung Touchkey support is the new tm2-touchkey driver and allows for touch key and LED functionality on the Exynos 5433 TM2 development board.

  • TinyDRM Queued For Linux 4.11

    TinyDRM has been queued in DRM-Next for landing with the in-development Linux 4.11 kernel.

    TinyDRM aims to provide "a very simplified view of DRM for displays that has onboard video memory and is connected through a slow bus like SPI/I2C." TinyDRM includes SPI and MIPI-DBI support.

Linux Devices

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Linux
  • How does the PocketCHIP compare to the Raspberry Pi?

    When the Raspberry Pi hit the tech scene, it made a huge impact. It wasn't the first tiny computer, by any means—the Chumby, the PogoPlug, and other hackable systems on chips preceded it—but there hadn't been anything quite so intentionally open and affordable as the Pi. You didn't have to hack the Pi, you just put an OS on an SD card, booted, and you were running an open source computer. The computer you were running only used a dozen watts of power, and it wasn't encased in a bulky plastic body that would end up in the landfill when you decided to upgrade.

  • LibreELEC 8.0.0 Officially Released for Raspberry Pi SBCs with Kodi 17 "Krypton"

    The development team behind the open-source LibreELEC operating system for Raspberry Pi and other embedded devices proudly announced today, February 22, 2017, the release and general availability of LibreELEC 8.0.0.

    Dubbed Krypton, LibreELEC 8.0.0 has been in development since early October last year, during which it received over 200 nightly builds, no less than ten official Alpha versions, and a total of three Beta releases. It's built around the recently released Kodi 17 "Krypton" open-source media center, so you'll enjoy all of its cool new features.

  • Tiny, rugged, fanless mini-PC runs Linux on quad-core Bay Trail

    ADL Embedded Solutions unveiled a tiny rugged mini-PC with quad- or dual-core Atom E3800 SoCs, HD video, 2x GbE, wide DC input, and -40 to 70°C temps.

    A couple of months ago, San Diego-based ADL Embedded Solutions unveiled a compact ADLE3800SEC single-board computer, featuring quad- and dual-core Atom E3800 processors and based on a new, 75 x 75mm “Edge-Connect” SBC form-factor. Now, the company has built a rugged, 86 x 81 x 33mm “ADLEPC-1500” mini-PC around it.

  • Understanding the Second Phone: That is Now Almost Always Also a Smartphone

    As I am finishing the new TomiAhonen Almanac 2017 edition, as always when looking at the data, I am noticing patterns. Ones that catch my eye are the exceptions. Where a given trend line does not conform to the overall industry growth curves. The 'second phone' fits this pattern. It is 'bucking the trend'.

    I have been reporting on second phones on this blog and in my books for ages and I have been asking for industry analysts to go measure their count. This is still a murky area for which very little data exists but we can estimate its size reasonably well if we take the total population of phones in use, and subtract the number of mobile phone owners who report having at least one active mobile phone and account. So the current numbers fresh from the TomiAhonen Almanac 2017, tell us that the world has 5.15 Billion unique mobile phone users (owners) - this is a number that increasingly is now also reported by others like Ericsson, Cisco and the GSM Association; and I did the comparison of this data point earlier this week to see how valid it is. (It is very valid).

  • FLOSS Weekly 422: Arduino Update

Clonezilla Live 2.5.0-25 Stable Release Is Powered by Linux 4.9.6 and Debian Sid

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GNU
Linux

Clonezilla Live and GParted Live creator Steven Shiau announced the availability of a new stable release of Clonezilla Live, versioned 2.5.0-25, bringing the latest GNU/Linux technologies and up-to-date software components.

Based on the Debian Sid repository as of February 20, 2017, Clonezilla Live 2.5.0-25 is now powered by the Linux 4.9.6 kernel and ships with a bunch of new packages, including Nmap, bicon, sshpass, keychain, and monitoring-plugins-basic.

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Kernel Space/Linux

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Linux

Ten Years as Desktop Linux User: My Open Source World, Then and Now

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GNU
Linux

I've been a regular desktop Linux user for just about a decade now. What has changed in that time? Keep reading for a look back at all the ways that desktop Linux has become easier to use -- and those in which it has become more difficult -- over the past ten years.

I installed Linux to my laptop for the first time in the summer of 2006. I started with SUSE, then moved onto Mandriva and finally settled on Fedora Core.

By early 2007 I was using Fedora full time. There was no more Windows partition on my laptop. When I ran into problems or incompatibilities with Linux, my options were to sink or swim. There was no Windows to revert back to.

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Kernel Space/Linux

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Linux
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More in Tux Machines

FOSS/Sharing in Government

  • Code.mil, the Pentagon's open-source initiative, is live
    That makes it difficult to attach open source licenses, according to the release, but the initiative “is experimenting with a legal pathway of using contract law in the Defense Open Source Agreement to add commonly used licenses to DoD software projects.”
  • Unlocking the government transformation strategy with open source
    Only by removing vendor lock-in and opening up development can the government hope to achieve its target.
  • Ventspils Controls Costs With FLOSS
    While Munich anguishes over considering returning to slavery, Ventspils relishes the freedom of Free/Libre Open Source software.
  • Are textbooks in or out? The state of open educational resources
    Open education is a hot topic in both the K-12 and higher education spaces due to a number of factors, including the desire to make education more affordable. The cost of textbooks has added a tremendous financial burden to students around the world. In response, the U.S. Department of Education initiated the #GoOpen movement last year, which helped provide the impetus for schools and universities to consider the use of open educational resources seriously. One of the leaders in this rapidly changing landscape in education is Cable Green, director of Open Education for Creative Commons.

FOSS Licensing

'Opening' Hardware

Security Leftovers