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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Security: Cracking, Elections and Apache Roy Schestowitz 21/10/2018 - 7:50pm
Story Colibri - A Browser Without Tabs Mohd Sohail 21/10/2018 - 7:13pm
Story Ubuntu 18.10 (Cosmic Cuttlefish) Screenshot Tour and Statistics Roy Schestowitz 21/10/2018 - 6:32pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 21/10/2018 - 6:07pm
Story Licensing in Kate and Other KDE News/Changes Roy Schestowitz 21/10/2018 - 6:04pm
Story Graphics: NVIDIA, Kazan, Sway and Panfrost Roy Schestowitz 21/10/2018 - 6:01pm
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 21/10/2018 - 5:17pm
Story The Performance & Power Efficiency Of The Core i7 990X vs. Core i9 9900K Rianne Schestowitz 21/10/2018 - 5:13pm
Story Linux and systemd updates, with Plasma 5.13.5, Applications 18.08.1 and Frameworks 5.50 by KDE now available to all Chakra users Rianne Schestowitz 21/10/2018 - 5:09pm
Story Can You Build An Open Source Pocket Operator? Roy Schestowitz 21/10/2018 - 9:12am

Security: Cracking, Elections and Apache

Filed under
Security
  • Hack [sic] on 8 adult websites exposes oodles of intimate user data

    A recent [crack] of eight poorly secured adult websites has exposed megabytes of personal data that could be damaging to the people who shared pictures and other highly intimate information on the online message boards. Included in the leaked file are (1) IP addresses that connected to the sites, (2) user passwords protected by a four-decade-old cryptographic scheme, (3) names, and (4) 1.2 million unique email addresses, although it’s not clear how many of the addresses legitimately belonged to actual users.

  • Professors discuss election security, voting systems at panel

    Amid questions of election security and potential system hacking in the upcoming midterm elections, Engineering prof. J. Alex Halderman spoke at the University of Michigan Alumni Center Thursday night about vulnerabilities in U.S. voting systems. Last June, Halderman appeared before the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence to testify about such.

    [...]

    “If an attack takes place, we won’t necessarily see the physical evidence," Halderman said. "The physical evidence that it took place is a discrepancy between what’s written on a piece of paper and what a computer total of that paper says. Because elections are so complicated, they’re so noisy, because the [crackers] can hide their traces in various ways, we won’t necessarily see when something like this happen for the first time. We've got to be ready.”

  • Apache Access Vulnerability Could Affect Thousands of Applications

    A recently discovered issue with a common file access method could be a major new attack surface for malware authors.
    Vulnerabilities in Apache functions have been at the root of significant breaches, including the one suffered by Equifax. Now new research indicates that another such vulnerability may be putting thousands of applications at risk.

    Lawrence Cashdollar, a vulnerability researcher and member of Akamai's Security Incident Response Team, found an issue with the way that thousands of code projects are using Apache .htaccess, leaving them vulnerable to unauthorized access and a subsequent file upload attack in which auto-executing code is uploaded to an application.

Colibri - A Browser Without Tabs

Filed under
Software

Almost all browsers are competing with each other in terms of functionality, speed, and performance. Though I did recently settle for Firefox as my default browser, I am still looking for better options. And this quest of mine took me to Colibri - A Browser without Tabs. And I was really interested in finding out what this meant. How could a browser be without tabs? It’s like a car without wheels. So here is a review of Colibri.

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Ubuntu 18.10 (Cosmic Cuttlefish) Screenshot Tour and Statistics

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu 18.10 (Cosmic Cuttlefish) Screenshot Tour | What’s New

    Here we are going to take a screenshot tour of the latest release Ubuntu 18.10 (Cosmic Cuttlefish). Let’s go through the recent changes since the earlier long term support release Ubuntu 18.04 (Bionic Beaver).

    Ubuntu 18.10 (Cosmic Cuttlefish) introduces major user interface changes and more mature interface since Canonical decided ditching Unity desktop environment. Cosmic release ships with Gnome Shell 3.30.1 desktop environment for its main Desktop release and there are more variants of desktop environments you could choose from, check the release notes for further information.

    The default desktop and login screen “GDM” features the Cuttlefish background with the usual color scheme for Ubuntu desktop releases. It comes with multiple colorful and cheering desktop backgrounds. I will leave a link down below if you are interested to download the default Wallpapers for Ubuntu 18.10 (Cosmic Cuttlefish).

  • Canonical and Ubuntu – user statistics

    Then you arrive at the story of Canonical and Ubuntu and things aren’t quite so clear anymore, lines are blurred. Ubuntu appears everywhere, sometimes accompanied by Canonical, but frequently not. Then sometimes Canonical tries to make an appearance alone and everyone is left asking ‘what is Canonical?’
    Well, no more. No more shall wondering what Canonical is be akin to a quiz question of who was the fourth Destiny’s Child. (Answer at the end)
    We all know Ubuntu, it’s the most popular open source operating system (OS) in the world, loved by developers for a multitude of reasons, it’s where innovation happens, and it’s everywhere.
    Canonical is described by Wikipedia (let’s face it that’s where your Google search takes you) as a UK-based, “privately held computer software company founded and funded by South African entrepreneur Mark Shuttleworth to market commercial support and related services for Ubuntu and related projects.”
    Well, that’s pretty accurate, but it doesn’t tell the whole story. You see, Canonical is passionate about Ubuntu. We love it. We all use it and we want everyone else to use the OS because we think it’s the best around and it’ll make your lives a lot easier.
    Canonical is full of people working on improving and adding to Ubuntu, from the OS to things that rely on the OS at the core but are more related to things such as Kubernetes, yes we really do Kubernetes, or OpenStack, AI/ML, and a whole host of technologies related to the internet of things (IoT).

Licensing in Kate and Other KDE News/Changes

Filed under
KDE
  • MIT licensed KSyntaxHighlighting usage

    With the KDE Frameworks 5.50 release, the KSyntaxHighlighting framework was re-licensed to the MIT license.

    This re-licensing only covers the actual code in the library and the bundled themes but not all of the syntax highlighting definition data files.

    One of the main motivation points was to get QtCreator to use this, if possible, instead of their own implementation of the Kate highlighting they needed to create in the past due to the incompatible licensing of KatePart at that time (and the impossibility to do a quick split/re-licensing of the parts in question).

  • This week in Usability & Productivity, part 41
  • KDE Will Now Set Scale Factor For GTK Apps, Plasma Gets Other Scaling & UI Polishing Too

    KDE developer Nate Graham is out with his weekly recap of interesting development activities impacting Plasma, Frameworks, and the Applications stack.

    When the display scaling factor for KDE is set to an integer, KDE will now export that as well to the GNOME/GTK environment variables of GDK_SCALE/GDK_DPI_SCALE, for helping out GTK applications running on the KDE desktop so they should still scale appropriately. The Wayland behavior was already correct while this should help out GTK X11 applications. The GNOME/GTK scaling though only supports scaling by integer numbers.

Graphics: NVIDIA, Kazan, Sway and Panfrost

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • NVIDIA Developers Express Interest In Helping Out libc++/libstdc++ Parallel Algorithms

    NVIDIA developers have expressed interest in helping the open-source GCC libstdc++ and LLVM Clang libc++ standard libraries in bringing up support for the standardized parallel algorithms.

    C++17 brings parallelized versions for some of the algorithms exposed by the C++ standard library, but sadly GCC's libstdc++ and LLVM's libc++ do not yet support these parallel algorithms while the rest of their C++17 support is in great shape. Going back over a year Intel has been interested in contributing parallel support code to these C++ standard libraries that could be shared by both projects. The Intel path builds in abstractions for supporting different underlying thread/parallelism APIs.

  • The Rust-Written Kazan Vulkan Driver Lights Up Its Shader Compiler

    This week the Kazan project (formerly known as "Vulkan-CPU") celebrated a small but important milestone in its trek to having a CPU-based Vulkan software implementation.

    As a refresher, Kazan is the project born as Vulkan-CPU during the 2017 Google Summer of Code. The work was started by student developer Jacob Lifshay and he made good progress last summer on the foundation of the project and continued contributing past the conclusion of that Google-funded program. By the end of the summer he was able to run some simple Vulkan compute tests. He also renamed Vulkan-CPU to Kazan (Japanese for "volcano").

  • Sway 1.0 Beta Released - Offers 100% Compatibility With i3 Window Manager

    The Sway Wayland compositor inspired by X11's i3 window manager is now up to its beta ahead of the big 1.0 release.

    Sway 1.0 Beta offers "100%" compatibility with the i3 window manager. The Sway 1.0 release has also been working on many other changes including improved window handling, multi-GPU support, virtual keyboard protocol, real-time video capture, tablet support, and many other changes.

  • Panfrost Open-Source GPU Driver Continues Advancing For Mali GPUs

    The Panfrost open-source, community-driven, reverse-engineered graphics driver for ARM Mali graphics processors continues panning out pretty well.

    Alyssa Rosenzweig has provided an update this weekend on the state of Panfrost for open-source Mali 3D support. The developers involved have been working out some texture issues, various OpenGL / GLES issues around GLMark2, and support now for running Wayland's Weston reference compositor.

The Performance & Power Efficiency Of The Core i7 990X vs. Core i9 9900K

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

With my initial Core i9 9900K benchmarks out there following Friday's embargo expiration, for some weekend benchmarking fun I decided to pull out the old Core i7 990X to see how it compares to the new 9900K... The Gulftown and Coffeelake processors were compared not only on raw performance but also overall power consumption and performance-per-Watt.

The Core i7 990X was the Extreme Edition processor back from 2011 codenamed "Gulftown" (Westmere microarchitecture), the 32nm generation before Sandy Bridge. Granted the announced but not yet released Core i9 9900X X-Series CPU will be more akin for comparison to the 990X, and I will at such time that it is available, but just for some extra benchmark runs over the weekend I was curious to see how the 990X and 9900K compare...

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Linux and systemd updates, with Plasma 5.13.5, Applications 18.08.1 and Frameworks 5.50 by KDE now available to all Chakra users

Filed under
KDE

This time we have been a bit late, as many of our contributors were busy over the last couple of months, but we hope we can soon get back to normal delivery times. Blushing

Better late than never though, so we are happy to inform you that on your next system upgrade you will receive newer versions of KDE’s Plasma, Applications and Frameworks, in addition to updates to important packages such as the linux kernel and systemd. The latest Plasma 5.14 2 series should follow soon.

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Can You Build An Open Source Pocket Operator?

Filed under
Hardware
OSS

Toys are now musical instruments. Or we’ll just say musical instruments are now toys. You can probably ascribe this recent phenomenon to Frooty Loops or whatever software the kids are using these days, but the truth is that it’s never been easier to lay down a beat. Just press the buttons on a pocket-sized computer.

One of the best examples of the playification of musical instruments is Pocket Operators from Teenage Engineering. They’re remarkable pieces of hardware, and really just a custom segment LCD and a few buttons. They also sound great and you can play real music with them. It’s a game changer when it comes to enabling musicianship.

Of course, with any popular platform, there’s a need for an Open Source copy. That’s where [Chris]’ Teensy Beats Shield comes in. It’s a ‘shield’ of sorts for a Teensy microcontroller that adds buttons, knobs, and a display, turning this into a platform that uses the Teensy’s incredible audio system designer.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Destination Linux EP92 – Elementary My Dear Distro

    On this very special episode of Destination Linux, we are joined by 2 friends of the show. Unfortunately, Zeb was sick this week so we needed a last minute guest host, thankfully Gabriele Musco of TechPills stepped up to help out. If that wasn’t special enough, Daniel Foré from elementary joined us for a segment to discuss the latest release of elementary OS 5.0 (Juno). This episode we discuss a ton of hot topics in the Linux world including Microsoft making 60,000 patents available to the Open Invention Network (OIN), Plex joins the universal package format game with a new Snap, Google+ announces it is shutting down after a security bug debacle, there were some patches proposed to the Linux kernel’s new Code of Conduct. All that and much more including our Tips, Tricks and Software Spotlight picks!

  • Tune Into Free Live Stream of Keynotes at Open Source Summit & ELC + OpenIoT Summit Europe, October 22-24!
  • ethtool Commands and Examples
  • WHAT TO DO AFTER INSTALLING ELEMENTARY OS 5.0
  • Weblate 3.2.2

    Weblate 3.2.2 has been released today. It's a second bugfix release for 3.2 fixing several minor issues which appeared in the release.

  • Kiwi TCMS 6.1

    We're happy to announce Kiwi TCMS version 6.1! This release introduces new database migrations, internal updates and bug fixes. It is a small release designed to minimize the number of database migrations by squashing them together. You can explore everything at https://demo.kiwitcms.org.

    NOTE: there is the 6.0.1 release which resolves an upgrade problem caused by non-applied migrations which have been later squashed and released in the same release! It is best to jump through the intermediate releases to ensure a smooth upgrade!

  • NeuroFedora update: week 42

    There is a lot of software available in NeuroFedora already. You can see the list here. If you use software that is not on our list, please suggest it to us using the suggestion form.

  • FPgM report: 2018-42
  • Asynchronous bodhi-ci
  • Fuchsia Friday: New ‘Sherlock’ prototype offers more questions than answers

    That brings us to today, with the newly developed Sherlock prototype. First introduced earlier this month, Sherlock features 2GB of RAM and an Amlogic T931 processor. There’s no public information about this processor, beyond it having at least 4 cores, but Amlogic’s T series chips have been almost exclusively built into Smart TVs.

    What makes me hesitant to definitively call Sherlock a Smart TV is a feature that the overwhelming majority of Smart TVs no longer have: a camera. A few short years ago, Smart TVs began to include microphones and cameras to offer things like voice control and Skype video calling.

    It didn’t take long for it to be discovered how vulnerable these devices were and that people probably don’t want their TV watching them back. Then again, that isn’t stopping a rumored Facebook set-top TV box with built-in camera.

  • Google’s Fuchsia OS could mean the end of Android

    If you’ve had your ear to the Google grapevine the past couple of years, you might already know about Fuchsia. As early as 2016 there were whispers and rumors about a new OS for Android, and little more has trickled down to public knowledge since then.

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • cairo release 1.16.0 now available

    After four years of development since 1.14.0, version 1.16.0 of the cairo 2D graphics library has been released.

  • Cairo 1.16 Released With OpenGL ES 3.0 Support, Colored Emojis

    It's been four years since the debut of the Cairo 1.14 stable series and today that has been succeeded by Cairo 1.16. Cairo, as a reminder, is the vector graphics library for 2D drawing and supports back-ends ranging from OpenGL to PDF, PostScript, DirectFB, and SVG outputs. Cairo is used by the likes of the GTK+ tool-kit, Mozilla's Gecko engine, Gnuplot, Poppler, and many other open-source projects.

  • Open source MDM offers flexibility, with challenges

    Open source platforms may require more effort from IT than commercial products do, but they can also address an organization's specific requirements -- if the company is willing to invest in the necessary resources.

    The open source mobile device management (MDM) market is very limited, but there are a few options. If organizations determine that an open source platform is worth the effort, then they can weigh a few different options for open source MDM tools.

  • Three-Year Moziversary

    Another year at Mozilla. They certainly don’t slow down the more you have of them.

    For once a year of stability, organization-wise. The two biggest team changes were the addition of Jan-Erik back on March 1, and the loss of our traditional team name “Browser Measurement II” for a more punchy and descriptive “Firefox Telemetry Team.”

  • Citus Data donates 1% equity to non-profit PostgreSQL orgs

    There’s open source and there’s open source.

    There’s genuine free and open source software (FOSS) and then there’s largely locked down proprietary non-dynamic library open source that is generally supplied as a commercially supported version of an open source kernel base that doesn’t see whole lot of real world code commits — and, no, there’s no acronym for that.

    Then, there’s other ways of evidencing real open openness such as non-technical contributions (could be language translation/localisation etc.) and then there’s plain old contributions.

    Scale-out Postgres database technologies ​​​​Citus Data is donating 1 percent of its equity to non-profit PostgreSQL organisations in the US and Europe.

  • Pagely NorthStack Makes WordPress Serverless

    WordPress is getting the serverless treatment, thanks to a new effort from managed WordPress hosting provider Pagely.

    The new NorthStack platform disaggregates the usual stack that WordPress requires into a series of services that largely run on serverless infrastructure at Amazon Web Services (AWS). The NorthStack effort is an attempt to lower the fixed costs and infrastructure needed to deploy and run WordPress.

    "WordPress itself is based on 12-year-old code. It does not want to be in a serverless environment," Joshua Strebel, CEO of Pagely, told eWEEK. "WordPress wants to live on one AWS EC2 node up next to its database with everything all contained in it."

  • Why Open Source Healthcare is Vital for Innovation

    Dana Lewis’ story is far from being a rarity. The diabetes industry is one of the worst offenders for overcharging or price gouging medication and equipment for patients. This is leading many individuals to take the same path as Dana Lewis.

    Open source platforms like OpenAPS, GitHub pages, and social media offer DIYers step-by-step instructions on how to build their own artificial pancreas tools.

    Kate Farnsworth built a DIY monitor device that keeps blood sugar levels of her diabetic daughter in constant check

    This tool, that has dramatically improved the life of a 15-year-old Sydney, cost her mom just $250.

  • The EU has approved Microsoft’s $7.5 billion GitHub acquisition

     

    Microsoft’s upcoming $7.5 billion acquisition of GitHub has cleared another major hurdle: the EU has approved the deal after determining that there are no antitrust concerns in Microsoft buying the popular open-source software repository, via the Financial Times.  

  • EU watchdog waves through Microsoft's GitHub takeover

     

    The EC noted that, in making its decision, it probed whether Microsoft would leverage the popularity of GitHut to boost sales of its own DevOps tools and cloud services, and looked into whether Microsoft would have the ability and incentive to further integrate its own DevOps tools and cloud services with GitHub while limiting integration with third parties' DevOps tools and cloud services.

  • Microsoft’s $7.5BN GitHub buy gets green-lit by EU regulators

     

    The Commission decided Microsoft would have no incentive to undermine the GitHub’s openness — saying any attempt to do so would reduce its value for developers, who the Commission judged as willing and able to switch to other platforms.

  • EU clears Microsoft acquisition of GitHub
  • Doing your civic duty one line of code at a time

    When it comes to doing our civic duty in today's technologically driven world, there is a perception that we don't care like older generations did. History teaches us that in the early 20th century's New Deal, Americans stepped up to the nation's challenges on a wide range of government-financed public works projects. Airport construction. Infrastructure improvements. Building dams, bridges, hospitals. This was more than just individuals "pulling themselves up by their bootstraps" but, by design, performing incredible civic duties. Quite an amazing feat when you think about it.

Security: U.S. CMS Breach and New Security Woes for Popular 'IoT' Protocols

Filed under
Security
  • U.S. CMS says 75,000 individuals' files accessed in data breach
  • CMS Responding to Suspicious Activity in Agent and Broker Exchanges Portal

    At this time, we believe that approximately 75,000 individuals’ files were accessed. While this is a small fraction of consumer records present on the FFE, any breach of our system is unacceptable.

  • New Security Woes for Popular IoT Protocols

    Researchers at Black Hat Europe will detail denial-of-service and other flaws in MQTT, CoAP machine-to-machine communications protocols that imperil industrial and other IoT networks online.
    Security researcher Federico Maggi had been collecting data – some of it sensitive in nature – from hundreds of thousands of Message Queuing Telemetry Transport (MQTT) servers he found sitting wide open on the public Internet via Shodan. "I would probe them and listen for 10 seconds or so, and just collect data from them," he says.

    He found data on sensors and other devices sitting in manufacturing and automotive networks, for instance, as well as typical consumer Internet of Things (IoT) gadgets.

    The majority of data, Maggi says, came from consumer devices and sensors or was data he couldn’t identify. "There was a good amount of data from factories, and I was able to find data coming from pretty expensive industrial machines, including a robot," he says.

BSD: FreeBSD 12.0 Beta and Upgrading OpenBSD with Ansible

Filed under
BSD

Graphics: XRGEARS and Arcan's Latest

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • XRGEARS: Infamous "Gears" Now On VR Headsets With OpenHMD, Vulkan

    Well, the virtual reality (VR) demo scene is now complete with having glxgears-inspired gears and Utah teapot rendering on VR head mounted displays with the new XRGEARS.

    Kidding aside about the gears and teapot, XRGEARS is a nifty new open-source project with real value by Collabora developer Lubosz Sarnecki. XRGEARS is a standalone VR demo application built using the OpenHMD initiative for tracking and Vulkan for rendering. XRGEARS supports both Wayland and X11 environments or even running off KMS itself. This code also makes use of VK_EXT_direct_mode_display with DRM leasing.

  • Arcan versus Xorg – Approaching Feature Parity

    This is the first article out of three in a series where I will go through what I consider to be the relevant Xorg feature set, and compare it, point by point, to how the corresponding solution or category works in Arcan.

    This article will solely focus on the Display Server set of features and how they relate to Xorg features, The second article will cover the features that are currently missing (e.g. network transparency) when they have been accounted for. The third article will cover the features that are already present in Arcan (and there are quite a few of those) but does not exist in Xorg.

  • Arcan Display Server Is Nearing Feature Parity With The X.Org Server

    The Arcan display server, which started off years ago sounding like a novelty with being a display server built off a game engine in part and other interesting features, is nearing feature parity with the X.Org Server.

    While most hobbyist display server projects have failed, Arcan has continued advancing and with an interesting feature set. Recently they have even been working on a virtual reality desktop and an interesting desktop in general. Arcan is getting close to being able to offering the same functionality as a traditional X.Org Server.

    If you are interested in a lengthy technical read about the differences between Arcan and X.Org, the Arcan developers themselves did some comparing and contrasting when it comes to the display support, windowing, input, font management, synchronization, and other areas.

CoC/Systemd Supremacy Over Linux Kernel

Filed under
Linux
  • New Linux Code of Conduct Revisions: CoC Committee Added Plus Interpretation & Mediator

    The Linux Code of Conduct introduced last month that ended up being quite contentious will see some revisions just ahead of the Linux 4.19 stable kernel release. Greg Kroah-Hartman has outlined the planned changes as well as a new Code of Conduct Interpretation document.

    In the weeks since the Linux kernel CoC was merged, various patches were proposed but none merged yet. It turns out Greg KH was working in private with various kernel maintainers/developers on addressing their feedback and trying to come up with solutions to the contentious issues in private.

  • Some kernel code-of-conduct refinements

    Greg Kroah-Hartman has posted a series of patches making some changes around the newly adopted code of conduct. In particular, it adds a new document describing how the code is to be interpreted in the kernel community.

  • Systemd Adds Feature To Fallback Automatically To Older Kernels On Failure

    Systemd's latest feature is the concept of "boot counting" that will track kernel boot attempts and failures as part of an automatic boot assessment. Ultimately this is to provide automatic fallback to older kernels should a newer kernel be consistently failing.

    The feature was crafted over the past few months by Lennart Poettering himself to provide a way when making use of systemd-boot on UEFI systems it can automatically fallback to an older kernel if a newer kernel is consistently causing problems. This is treated as an add-on to the Boot Loader Specification. The systemd boot assessment is designed that it could also be used by non-UEFI systems and other boot platforms.

ODROID 'Hacker Board'

Filed under
Hardware
  • ODROID Rolling Out New Intel-Powered Single Board Computer After Trying With Ryzen

    While ODROID is most known for their various ARM single board computers (SBCs), some of which offer impressive specs, they have dabbled in x86 SBCs and on Friday announced the Intel-powered ODROID-H2.

    In the announcement they mentioned as well they were exploring an AMD Ryzen 5 2500U powered SBC computer, which offered fast performance but the price ended up being prohibitive. After the falling out with Ryzen over those cost concerns, they decided to go ahead with an Intel Geminilake SoC. Geminilake is slower than their proposed Ryzen board, but the price was reasonable and it ends up still being much faster than ODROID's earlier Apollolake SBC.

  • Odroid-H2 is world’s first Gemini Lake hacker board

    Hardkernel unveiled the Odroid-H2, the first hacker board with an Intel Gemini Lake SoC. The Ubuntu 18.10 driven SBC ships with 2x SATA 3.0, 2x GbE, HDMI and DP, 4x USB, and an M.2 slot for NVMe.

    When the Odroid-H2 goes on sale in November at a price that will be “higher than $100,” Hardkernel will join a small group of vendors that have launched a community backed x86-based SBC. This first open spec hacker board built around Intel’s new Gemini Lake SoC — and one of the first Gemini Lake SBCs of any kind — follows earlier Arm-based Odroid winners such as the Odroid-C2 Raspberry Pi pseudo clone and the octa-core Odroid-XU4.

A Look At The Many Features On The Table For The Upcoming Linux 4.20~5.0 Kernel

Filed under
Linux

If all goes as planned, tomorrow will mark the availability of the Linux 4.19 stable kernel. That is also expected to mark the return of Linus Torvalds from his retreat where he was working on his empathy skills and politeness. The 4.19 stable release will then kick off the merge window for the next kernel cycle.

It's still not set in stone yet whether the next kernel release will be Linux 4.20 or Linux 5.0. Linus Torvalds previously communicated -- and what he did in going from Linux 3.19 to 4.0 -- was that when otherwise hitting the x.20 release is time to bump the major kernel version number. So it's likely the next kernel cycle will be Linux 5.0, but we'll see if the new-and-improved Torvalds has different feelings now over the versioning scheme.

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today's howtos

Licensing in Kate and Other KDE News/Changes

  • MIT licensed KSyntaxHighlighting usage
    With the KDE Frameworks 5.50 release, the KSyntaxHighlighting framework was re-licensed to the MIT license. This re-licensing only covers the actual code in the library and the bundled themes but not all of the syntax highlighting definition data files. One of the main motivation points was to get QtCreator to use this, if possible, instead of their own implementation of the Kate highlighting they needed to create in the past due to the incompatible licensing of KatePart at that time (and the impossibility to do a quick split/re-licensing of the parts in question).
  • This week in Usability & Productivity, part 41
  • KDE Will Now Set Scale Factor For GTK Apps, Plasma Gets Other Scaling & UI Polishing Too
    KDE developer Nate Graham is out with his weekly recap of interesting development activities impacting Plasma, Frameworks, and the Applications stack. When the display scaling factor for KDE is set to an integer, KDE will now export that as well to the GNOME/GTK environment variables of GDK_SCALE/GDK_DPI_SCALE, for helping out GTK applications running on the KDE desktop so they should still scale appropriately. The Wayland behavior was already correct while this should help out GTK X11 applications. The GNOME/GTK scaling though only supports scaling by integer numbers.

Graphics: NVIDIA, Kazan, Sway and Panfrost

  • NVIDIA Developers Express Interest In Helping Out libc++/libstdc++ Parallel Algorithms
    NVIDIA developers have expressed interest in helping the open-source GCC libstdc++ and LLVM Clang libc++ standard libraries in bringing up support for the standardized parallel algorithms. C++17 brings parallelized versions for some of the algorithms exposed by the C++ standard library, but sadly GCC's libstdc++ and LLVM's libc++ do not yet support these parallel algorithms while the rest of their C++17 support is in great shape. Going back over a year Intel has been interested in contributing parallel support code to these C++ standard libraries that could be shared by both projects. The Intel path builds in abstractions for supporting different underlying thread/parallelism APIs.
  • The Rust-Written Kazan Vulkan Driver Lights Up Its Shader Compiler
    This week the Kazan project (formerly known as "Vulkan-CPU") celebrated a small but important milestone in its trek to having a CPU-based Vulkan software implementation. As a refresher, Kazan is the project born as Vulkan-CPU during the 2017 Google Summer of Code. The work was started by student developer Jacob Lifshay and he made good progress last summer on the foundation of the project and continued contributing past the conclusion of that Google-funded program. By the end of the summer he was able to run some simple Vulkan compute tests. He also renamed Vulkan-CPU to Kazan (Japanese for "volcano").
  • Sway 1.0 Beta Released - Offers 100% Compatibility With i3 Window Manager
    The Sway Wayland compositor inspired by X11's i3 window manager is now up to its beta ahead of the big 1.0 release. Sway 1.0 Beta offers "100%" compatibility with the i3 window manager. The Sway 1.0 release has also been working on many other changes including improved window handling, multi-GPU support, virtual keyboard protocol, real-time video capture, tablet support, and many other changes.
  • Panfrost Open-Source GPU Driver Continues Advancing For Mali GPUs
    The Panfrost open-source, community-driven, reverse-engineered graphics driver for ARM Mali graphics processors continues panning out pretty well. Alyssa Rosenzweig has provided an update this weekend on the state of Panfrost for open-source Mali 3D support. The developers involved have been working out some texture issues, various OpenGL / GLES issues around GLMark2, and support now for running Wayland's Weston reference compositor.

Android Leftovers