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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Ubuntu 20.10 Based Flavors Now Available, Download Now arindam1989 24/10/2020 - 4:58am
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 24/10/2020 - 12:14am
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 23/10/2020 - 11:56pm
Story Wine 5.20 Released Roy Schestowitz 1 23/10/2020 - 11:46pm
Story Devices/Embedded: Arduino and More Roy Schestowitz 23/10/2020 - 10:48pm
Story Ubuntu 20.10 Arrives Today! Here are 11 New Features in Ubuntu 20.10 Groovy Gorilla Roy Schestowitz 23 23/10/2020 - 10:43pm
Story PostmarketOS update brings HDMI support for the PinePhone and PineTab Roy Schestowitz 23/10/2020 - 7:43pm
Story Lenovo Launches ThinkPad and ThinkStation PCs with Ubuntu 20.04 LTS Marius Nestor 15 23/10/2020 - 7:28pm
Story What’s New in Pop!_OS 20.10 Rianne Schestowitz 1 23/10/2020 - 6:38pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 23/10/2020 - 6:29pm

Ubuntu 20.10 Based Flavors Now Available, Download Now

Filed under
Ubuntu

The seven official flavors of Ubuntu 20.10 are now available with the latest builds and .iso images and ready for you - Kubuntu, Lubuntu, Xubuntu, Ubuntu Budgie, Ubuntu Kylin, Ubuntu MATE, and Ubuntu Studio - 20.10.
Read more

Devices/Embedded: Arduino and More

Filed under
Hardware

       

  • Arduino Blog » Driving a mini RC bumper car with a Nintendo Wii Balance Board

    Taking inspiration from Colin Furze’s 600cc bumper car constructed a few years ago, Henry Forsyth decided to build his own RC miniature version. His device features a 3D-printed and nicely-painted body, along with a laser-cut chassis that holds the electrical components.

    The vehicle is driven by a single gearmotor and a pair of 3D-printed wheels, with another caster-style wheel that’s turned left and right by a servo steering. An Arduino Uno and Bluetooth shield are used for overall control with a motor driver.

    The Bluetooth functionality allows for user interface via a PS4 controller, or even (after a bit of programming) a Wii Balance Board. In the end, the PS4 remote seems to be the better control option, but who knows where else this type of balance technique could be employed?

  • Intel Elkhart Lake COM’s offer up to 3x 2.5GbE, SIL2 functional safety
  • E3K all-in-one wireless bio-sensing platform supports EMG, ECG, and EEG sensors (Crowdfunding)

    Over the year, The maker community has designed several platforms to monitor vital signs with boards like Healthy Pi v4 or HeartyPatch both of which are powered by an ESP32 WiFi & Bluetooth wireless SoC. WallySci has designed another all-in-one wireless bio-sensing platform, called E3K, that also happens to be powered by Espressif Systems ESP32 chip, and can be connected to an electromyography (EMG) sensor to capture muscle movements, an electrocardiography (ECG) sensor to measure heart activity, and/or an electroencephalography (EEG) sensor to capture brain activity. The board also has an extra connector to connect a 9-axis IMU to capture motion.

  • Coffee Lake system can expand via M.2, mini-PCIe, PCIe, and Xpansion

    MiTac’s fanless, rugged “MX1-10FEP” embedded computer has an 8th or 9th Gen Coffee Lake Core or Xeon CPU plus 3x SATA bays, 4x USB 3.1 Gen 2, 2x M.2, 2x mini-PCIe, and optional PCIe x16 and x1.

    MiTac recently introduced a Coffee Lake based MX1-10FEP computer that is also being distributed by ICP Germany. This month, ICP announced that the MX1-10FEP-D model with PCIe x16 and PCIe x1 slots has been tested and classified by Nvidia as “NGC Ready” for Nvidia GPU Cloud graphics boards such as the Nvidia T4 and Tesla P4.

    [...]

    The MX1-10FEP has an Intel C246 chipset and defaults to Windows 10 with Linux on request.

Wine 5.20 Released

Filed under
Software

The Wine development release 5.20 is now available.

What's new in this release (see below for details):
  - More work on the DSS cryptographic provider.
  - A number of fixes for windowless RichEdit.
  - Support for FLS callbacks.
  - Window resizing in the new console host.
  - Various bug fixes.

The source is available from the following locations:

  https://dl.winehq.org/wine/source/5.x/wine-5.20.tar.xz
  http://mirrors.ibiblio.org/wine/source/5.x/wine-5.20.tar.xz

Binary packages for various distributions will be available from:

  https://www.winehq.org/download

You will find documentation on https://www.winehq.org/documentation

You can also get the current source directly from the git
repository. Check https://www.winehq.org/git for details.

Wine is available thanks to the work of many people. See the file
AUTHORS in the distribution for the complete list.

Read more

Also: Wine 5.20 Released With Various Improvements For Running Windows Software On Linux

PostmarketOS update brings HDMI support for the PinePhone and PineTab

Filed under
OS
Gadgets

When the PinePhone postmarketOS Community Edition smartphone began shipping to customers in September it came with a version of the operating system with one important feature missing: HDMI output.

So when my phone arrived a few weeks ago I was able to spend some time familiarizing myself with the operating system and I could plug in the included Convergence Dock to use USB accessories including a keyboard, mouse, and storage. But I wasn’t able to connect an external display.

Now I can.

Read more

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos
  • How To Install Ubuntu 20.10 Groovy Gorilla

    This tutorial explains Ubuntu 20.10 Groovy Gorilla computer installation. You will prepare at least two disk partitions, finishing it all in about twenty minutes, and enjoy! Let's start right now.

  • How to install Ubuntu 20.10 - YouTube

    In this video, I am going to show how to install Ubuntu 20.10.

  • How To Install Webmin on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS - idroot

    In this tutorial we will show you how to install Webmin on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS, as well as some extra required packages by Webmin control panel

  • Running Ironic Standalone on RHEL | Adam Young’s Web Log

    This is only going to work if you have access to the OpenStack code. If you are not an OpenStack customer, you are going to need an evaluation entitlement. That is beyond the scope of this article.

  • Introduction to Ironic

    The sheer number of projects and problem domains covered by OpenStack was overwhelming. I never learned several of the other projects under the big tent. One project that is getting relevant to my day job is Ironic, the bare metal provisioning service. Here are my notes from spelunking the code.

  • Adding Nodes to Ironic

    TheJulia was kind enough to update the docs for Ironic to show me how to include IPMI information when creating nodes.

  • Secure NTP with NTS

    Many computers use the Network Time Protocol (NTP) to synchronize their system clocks over the internet. NTP is one of the few unsecured internet protocols still in common use. An attacker that can observe network traffic between a client and server can feed the client with bogus data and, depending on the client’s implementation and configuration, force it to set its system clock to any time and date. Some programs and services might not work if the client’s system clock is not accurate. For example, a web browser will not work correctly if the web servers’ certificates appear to be expired according to the client’s system clock. Use Network Time Security (NTS) to secure NTP.

    Fedora 331 is the first Fedora release to support NTS. NTS is a new authentication mechanism for NTP. It enables clients to verify that the packets they receive from the server have not been modified while in transit. The only thing an attacker can do when NTS is enabled is drop or delay packets. See RFC8915 for further details about NTS.

    NTP can be secured well with symmetric keys. Unfortunately, the server has to have a different key for each client and the keys have to be securely distributed. That might be practical with a private server on a local network, but it does not scale to a public server with millions of clients.

    NTS includes a Key Establishment (NTS-KE) protocol that automatically creates the encryption keys used between the server and its clients. It uses Transport Layer Security (TLS) on TCP port 4460. It is designed to scale to very large numbers of clients with a minimal impact on accuracy. The server does not need to keep any client-specific state. It provides clients with cookies, which are encrypted and contain the keys needed to authenticate the NTP packets. Privacy is one of the goals of NTS. The client gets a new cookie with each server response, so it doesn’t have to reuse cookies. This prevents passive observers from tracking clients migrating between networks.

  • Comfortable Motion: Absolutely Cursed Vim Scrolling - YouTube

    Have you ever felt like Vim was too useful and thought hey let's change that, well that's what this dev thought and now we have a plugin called comfortable motion that's adds physics based scrolling into vim, what's physics based scrolling you ask. Well it's scrolling that occurs based on how long you hold down the scroll key.

  • Running Cassandra on Fedora 32 | Adam Young’s Web Log

    This is not a tutorial. These are my running notes from getting Cassandra to run on Fedora 32. The debugging steps are interesting in their own right. I’ll provide a summary at the end for any sane enough not to read through the rest.

  • Recovering Audio off an Old Tape Using Audacity | Adam Young’s Web Log

    One of my fiorends wrote a bunch of music back in high school. The only remainig recordings are on a casette tape that he produced. Time has not been kind to the recordings, but they are audible…barely. He has a device that produces MP3s from the tape. My job has been to try and get them so that we can understand them well enough to recover the original songs.

    I have the combined recording on a single MP3. I’ve gone through and noted the times where each song starts and stops. I am going to go through the steps I’ve been using to go from that single long MP3 to an individual recording.

  • Role of Training and Certification at the Linux Foundation

    Open source allows anyone to dip their toes in the code, read up on the documentation, and learn everything on their own. That’s how most of us did it, but that’s just the first step. Those who want to have successful careers in building, maintaining, and managing IT infrastructures of companies need more structured hands-on learning with real-life experience. That’s where Linux Foundation’s Training and Certification unit enters the picture. It helps not only greenhorn developers but also members of the ecosystem who seek highly trained and certified engineers to manage their infrastructure. Swapnil Bhartiya sat down with Clyde Seepersad, SVP and GM of Training and Certification at the Linux Foundation, to learn more about the Foundation’s efforts to create a generation of qualified professionals.

  • Hetzner build machine

    This is part of a series of posts on compiling a custom version of Qt5 in order to develop for both amd64 and a Raspberry Pi.

    Building Qt5 takes a long time. The build server I was using had CPUs and RAM, but was very slow on I/O. I was very frustrated by that, and I started evaluating alternatives. I ended up setting up scripts to automatically provision a throwaway cloud server at Hetzner.

Leftovers: Debian, Graphics and Audiocasts

Filed under
Misc

  • Integer Scaling To Come With Linux 5.11 For Intel Graphics Driver - Phoronix

    Going back more than a year there have been Intel "i915" kernel graphics driver patches implementing integer mode scaling support while finally for Linux 5.11 in early 2021 the support will have landed.

    Intel added integer mode scaling to their Windows graphics driver back in 2019 to provide better clarity when upscaling games (particularly pixel art type content) and other software. The Linux patches materialized in September 2019 for nearest-neighbor integer mode scaling and then seemingly forgotten about. The capability works with Gen11 / Ice Lake and newer.

  • Linux Support for Variable Refresh Rates On Gen12+ Intel GPUs Is On The Way - LinuxReviews

    Intel developer Manasi Navare has submitted a series of patches for the Linux kernel that brings support for variable refresh rates on Intel's latest graphics chips to the Linux kernels i915 driver. The feature is only enabled on Tiger Lake, Sapphire Rapids and newer Intel graphics chips.

    [...]

    You do not need a special "Freesync" monitor to use adaptive vertical synchronization, Freesync is just a marketing term used by AMD. The DisplayPort specification has included variable refresh rate (VRR) as an option feature since DP 1.4 and there are many monitors with support for it that are not marketed as "Freesync" or "gaming" monitors. Monitors that are marketed as "Freesync" support the standard DisplayPort VRR protocol so you don't need to use a AMD graphics card to get the benefits of a Freesync monitor. You will soon be able to use one of the very latest Intel CPU's with integrated graphics or one of Intel's upcoming dedicated graphics cards with Freesync monitors on Linux.

  • Salsa updated to GitLab 13.5

    Today, GitLab released the version 13.5 with several new features. Also Salsa got some changes applied to it.

    [...]

    It's been way over two years since we started to use Google Compute Engine (GCE) for Salsa. Since then, all the jobs running on the shared runners run within a n1-standard-1 instance, providing a fresh set of one vCPU and 3.75GB of RAM for each and every build.

    GCE supports several new instance types, featuring better and faster CPUs, including current AMD EPICs. However, as it turns out, GCE does not support any single vCPU instances for any of those types. So jobs in the future will use n2d-standard-2 for the time being, provinding two vCPUs and 8GB of RAM..

  • Social Media Regulation and Journalism

    Doc Searls, Katherine Druckman, and Petros Koutoupis talk social media regulation and its relationship to journalism and the threat to Section 230.

  • Automation Entropy Factor | Self-Hosted 30

    Chris gets left out in the cold after a Home Assistant glitch, and Alex puts a big batch of USB hard drives to the test

    Plus a great pick for you pack rats, feedback, and more.

  • Tribalism and Toxicity in the Linux Community - YouTube

    Gatekeeping, tribalism and toxicity in the Linux community. We're tired of it and it's time to silence it. But WHY does it happen, and HOW do we DEAL with it?

Oracle/Red Hat/Fedora Leftovers

Filed under
Red Hat

Free Software and OSS, Security Leftovers

Filed under
OSS

  • Justin W. Flory: Hacktoberfest 2020 with TeleIRC

    October is here! If you contribute to Open Source projects, you might know that October is the month of Hacktoberfest. DigitalOcean teams up with different partners each year to send a t-shirt (or plant a tree on your behalf) for anyone who makes four GitHub Pull Requests in October. And guess what? TeleIRC is a participating project for you to get your Hacktoberfest t-shirt or tree!

    This post identifies specific tasks the TeleIRC team identified as “good first issues” for Hacktoberfest hackers. They are in order of least difficult to most difficult. Golang developers especially are encouraged to participate!

  • Open Source Summit Europe & ELCE 2020

    Following a great virtual ELC & Open Source Summit North America last June/July, Collabora will be attending their European counterparts, Open Source Summit Europe & Embedded Linux Conference Europe, which take place next week, from October 26 to October 29.

    "The 4-day event is dedicated to everything open source and will showcase a program of 250+ talks (conference session, tutorials, BoFs and keynotes) across tracks covering Linux Systems, IoT, AI, Cloud & Cloud Native, OS Dependability, OS Databases, Diversity & Inclusion, OS Leadership, Open Source Program Office Management (TODO) and the Embedded Linux Conference."

    Collaborans will once again be actively participating in the week's activities with no less than 8 presentations on topics including fuzzing Linux drivers with syzkaller, efficient syscall emulation on Linux, demystifying Linux kernel initcalls, creating Debian-based embedded systems in the Cloud using debos, simplifying and reusing your driver's code with regmaps, the new Futux2() system call, and the state of Linux gaming. You can find the details for all of these presentations below.

  • [Old] Mozilla WebThings To Become An Independent Open Source Project

    Mozilla has announced that Mozilla WebThings is being “spun out” as an independent open source project. It means that WebThings is no longer going to be a direct project from Mozilla.

    The company says that it’s winding down its direct investment in WebThings. This transition will happen to stabilize the WebThings gateways around the world. Now, WebThings is getting an independent domain and will work on the web of things, independent of Mozilla.

  • Firefox on Fedora with OpenH264 – Martin Stransky's Blog

    Firefox on Fedora which sits in the updates [F32][F31] right now comes with enabled OpenH264 Cisco decoder for video playback and fdk-aac-free used for audio decoding.

    It’s implemented by GMP (Gecko Media Plugin) API so the OpenH264 is not used through ffmpeg library but Firefox sandboxed interface, the same as Firefox uses for Widevine CDM plugin.

    The OpenH264 GMP video playback is a fallback solution when system ffmpeg is missing and internal ffvpx library can’t decode the stream, so ffmpeg from RPM Fusion is always a better alternative if you can install it.

    The video streams are decoded by system wide OpenH264 2.1.1 which is shipped by Fedora as mozilla-openh264 rpm package. Even if Mozilla OpenH264 (1.8.1) plugin is installed in your profile and claimed at about:plugins page, the Fedora system one is used.

  • GNU Parallel - News: GNU Parallel 20201022 ('Samuel Paty') [Savannah]

    GNU Parallel 20201022 ('Samuel Paty') has been released. It is available for download at: http://ftpmirror.gnu.org/parallel/

    Please help spreading GNU Parallel by making a testimonial video like Juan Sierra Pons: http://www.elsotanillo.net/wp-content/uploads/GnuParallel_JuanSierraPons.mp4 It does not have to be as detailed as Juan's. It is perfectly fine if you just say your name, and what field you are using GNU Parallel for.

  •  

  •  
    Psychotherapy centre's database [cracked], patient info held ransom

                     

                       

    The Helsinki-based company said that the [crackers] who [copied] the data made attempts to extort money in exchange for its return.

  • EU imposes sanctions on GRU officers over ‘Fancy Bear’ cyberattacks

    The Council of the European Union has imposed sanctions on two Russian citizens and a military intelligence center due to cyberattacks targeting Germany’s parliament in 2015 and the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) in 2018. This was announced in the latest volume of the Official Journal of the European Union. The United Kingdom announced plans to enforce these sanctions, as well. 

  • Open Education and Artificial Scarcity in Hard Times

    The sudden move to remote education by universities this year has forced the inevitable: the move to an online education. While most universities won’t be fully remote, having course materials online was already becoming the norm before the COVID-19 pandemic, and this year it has become mandatory for millions of educators and students. As academia recovers from this crisis, and hopefully prepares for the next one, the choices we make will send us down one of two paths. We can move towards a future of online education which replicates the artificial scarcity of traditional publishing, or take a path which fosters an abundance of free materials by embracing the principles of open access and open education.

    The well-worn, hefty, out-of-date textbook you may have bought some years ago was likely obsolete the moment you had a reliable computer and an Internet connection. Traditional textbook publishers already know this, and tout that they have embraced the digital era and have ebooks and e-rentals available—sometimes even at a discount. Despite some state laws discouraging the practice, publishers try to bundle their digital textbooks into “online learning systems,” often at the expense of the student. However, the costs and time needed to copy and send thousands of the digital textbooks themselves is trivial compared to their physical equivalent. 

  • Hybrid open access risks limiting researchers’ publishing options

    In the case of the 34 Nature-branded journals, the first step is a “read and publish” deal with Germany’s Max Planck institutes, allowing affiliated researchers to both access the journals and to publish in them open access. The OA fee that Max Planck will pay is based on a cost of €9,500 (£8,600) per article. The publisher, Springer Nature, says that it is in discussions to allow authors worldwide to publish open access in Nature journals from next year.

    The UK alone spends more than £25 million on OA journal publishing annually, but the proportion that goes to large commercial publishers for OA in hybrid journals has increased year-on-year. The average cost for publishing in hybrid journals also continues to increase steadily.

    This trend has been evident since Springer Nature launched its leading OA journals, Nature Communications and Scientific Reports. In 2018 alone, these journals received more than £1.6 million from 30 UK research-intensive institutions. In 2019, Elsevier launched 100 new OA journals and the humanities publisher IEEE launched 13.

  • Cloud Foundry Is A Developer Experience For Kubernetes | Chip Childers
  • OpenStack Foundation Rebrands as Open Infrastructure Foundation

    Also announced at the Open Infrastructure Summit was the OpenStack Victoria open source cloud platform, with improved integration with Kubernetes and enhanced IPv6 support. / In a keynote at the event, Thierry Carrez, vice president of engineering at the Open Infrastructure Foundation, said his personal definition for cloud native is applications designed to run on programmable infrastructure. "Cloud native requires programmable infrastructure, and open infrastructure provides an open source solution for that," Carrez said. "So cloud native and open infrastructure really go together like bread and butter."

  • OpenStack Foundation transforms into the Open Infrastructure Foundation

    The writing was on the wall two years ago. The OpenStack Foundation was going to cover more than just the OpenStack Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) cloud. Today, that metamorphosis is complete. The Foundation now covers a wide variety of open-source cloud and container technologies as the Open Infrastructure Foundation.

Programming Leftovers

Filed under
Development

  • LLVM Clang 12 Adds Support For Vectorization Using Glibc's Vector Math Library - Phoronix

    Upstream LLVM/Clang now supports making use of the vector math library found within the GNU C Library.

    Clang 12 will allow for vectorization using libmvec via the -fvec-lib=libmvec compiler option.

  • Notes to self on frama-c | Richard WM Jones

    Frama-C is a giant modular system for writing formal proofs of C code. For months I’ve been on-and-off trying to see if we could use it to do useful proofs for any parts of the projects we write, like qemu, libvirt, libguestfs, nbdkit etc. I got side-tracked at first with this frama-c tutorial which is fine, but I got stuck trying to make the GUI work.

  • Why I Dislike Switch Statements

    Of course this is a contrived example, but readers will hopefully agree it's representative of the construct.

  • Setup - Full Stack Tracing Part 2 - KDAB

    If you’ve read the first article in this series, you’ll know what full stack tracing is and why you definitely want it. This time, we’ll show you how to setup full stack tracing on your Linux system. There are two steps – first get everything configured to capture a trace, and then view and interpret the trace.

    Setup full stack tracing with a bit of kernel help

    To capture a trace, we’ll be using LTTng (Linux tracing toolkit next generation) in our examples. LTTng captures tracepoints with minimal overhead. This is something you definitely want, as too much extra CPU introduced by tracing can change the system’s behavior, even causing it to fail unpredictably. Another factor in LTTng’s favor is that it’s well supported by the open source community.

    LTTng was designed to record kernel level events. However, you’ll also want to use its user space tracepoints to capture application level events. That will give you consistent visibility, regardless of where execution moves throughout the software stack. User space tracepoints is critical to the setup of full stack tracing as it lets you integrate application, Qt, and kernel tracepoints together in a single view.

  • Mariuz's Blog: Firebird 3.0.7 sub-release is available

    Firebird Project is happy to announce general availability of Firebird 3.0.7 — the latest point release in the Firebird 3.0 series.This sub-release offers many bug fixes and also adds a few improvements, please refer to the Release Notes for the full list of changes.Binary kits for Windows, Linux, Mac OS and Android platforms are immediately available for download.All users of Firebird v3.0.6 are

  • Use of self or $this in PHP – Linux Hint

    In PHP object-oriented programming, we have the self keyword and $this variable that is used for different purposes. The self keyword represents current and static members of the class. While the $this variable represents current object and non-static members of the class. More about these are discussed in this article.

  • 4 C programming courses for every skill level

    Even with so many other system-level languages to choose from, C remains the popular choice. Many key projects—such as the Linux kernel and the Python runtime—still use C, and they will likely do so indefinitely. For some fields of computing, like embedded programming, C is a must.
    And there has never been a better time to learn C. Resources abound, from books to guided courses. Here we’ll look at four major online course offerings for learning C programming, each aimed at different levels of user and offering different approaches. For instance, one combines learning C with learning Linux, while another teaches C and C++ together.

  • rand() Function in C Language – Linux Hint

    In the C language, the rand() function is used for Pseudo Number Generator(PRNG). The random numbers generated by the rand() function are not truly random. It is a sequence that repeats periodically, but the period is so large that we can ignore it. The rand() function works by remembering a seed value that is used to compute the next random number and the next new seed. In this article, we are going to discuss in detail how random numbers can be generated using the rand() function. So, let’s get started!

  • A bug by any other name – Open Source Security

    This tweet from Jim Manico really has me thinking about why we like to consider security bugs special. There are a lot of tools on the market today to scan your github repos, containers, operating systems, web pages … pick something, for security vulnerabilities. I’ve written a very very long series about these scanners and why they’re generally terrible today but will get better, but only if we demand it. I’m now wondering why we want to consider security special. Why do we have an entire industry focused just on security bugs?

    Let’s change the conversation a little bit. Rather than focus on security bugs, let’s ask the question: Which bugs in a given project should we care about?

    There are of course bugs an attacker could use to compromise your system. There are also bugs that could result in data loss. Or bugs that could bring everything down. What about a bug that uses 10% more CPU? Every piece of software has bugs. All bugs are equal, but some bugs are more equal than others.

    We are at a time in software history where we have decided security bugs are more equal than other bugs. This has created entire industries around scanning just for security problems. Unfortunately the end goal isn’t always to fix problems, the goal is often to find problems, so problems are found (a LOT of problems). I think this is a pretty typical case of perverse incentives. You will always find what you measure. The pendulum will swing back in time, maybe we can help it swing a little faster.

  • Why you should use ppport.h in your XS code modules | Karl Williamson [blogs.perl.org]
    
    
    
    
    The answer comes down to two words: Security and Reliability.
    As a bonus, less work on your part.
    
    
    
    
    It's surprising to find that there are modules on CPAN that aren't using
    ppport.h that could stand to benefit from it.
    
    
    
    
    ppport.h is a file that is part of the Devel::PPPort distribution. As you
    know, Perl has evolved over the years, adding new features, and new API for XS
    writers to use. Some of that is to support the new features, and some to make
    tasks easier to accomplish. ppport.h implements portions of the API that
    people have found desirable to have when a module gets installed in a Perl that
    was released before that API element was created. You can write your module
    using the latest API, and have it automatically work on old Perls, simply by
    #including ppport.h in your XS code. ppport.h generally provides support for
    an API element as is reasonably practicable, with many supported to 5.03007.
    
    
    
    
    Importantly, but often overlooked, ppport.h can override buggy early Perl
    implementations of an API element. By using it, you get fixed, proper
    behavior. That sure beats trying to reproduce a reported problem in your
    module that only happens in some ancient Perl, and then try to come up with a
    workaround in an area you aren't familiar with.
    
    
    
    
    This is especially important if your XS code interacts with Unicode in any way.
    Early versions of the Unicode standard and early Perls allowed things that we
    now know are potential attack vectors. Right now, someone could be using your
    module to hack into systems, so you are actually being negligent if you don't
    use ppport.h.
    
    
    
    
    If your XS code has preprocessor #if statements that check for the existence of
    functions, macros, etc, that are only in later perls, you can generally avoid
    that by simply using ppport.h
    

Bug Hunting Session for LibreOffice 7.1 Alpha

Filed under
LibO

LibreOffice 7.1 is being developed by our worldwide community, and is due to be released in early February 2021 -- see the release notes describing the new features here.

In order to find, report and triage bugs, the LibreOffice QA team is organizing the first Bug Hunting Session for LibreOffice 7.1 on Monday October 26 , 20 20 . Tests will be performed on the first Alpha version. Builds will be available for Linux (DEB and RPM), macOS and Windows, and can be installed and run in parallel along with the production version.

Read more

Also: Camera Rotation Improvement - LibreOffice / Collabora Office

SUSE/OpenSUSE Tumbleweed, OBS and MicroOS

Filed under
SUSE
  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the week 2020/43 – Dominique a.k.a. DimStar (Dim*)

    During this week, we have only released 3 snapshots (1019, 1021, and 1022). a bunch of snapshots has been tested and discarded due to some bugs we, and surely either you, did not want to see on your machines. But as usual; lesser snapshots do not mean less change, as things just cumulate until we feel confident to send a snapshot out again.

  • Introducing the Open Build Service Connector [Ed: SUSE sucking up to Microsoft's openwashed proprietary software as usual]

    That’s right. The Open Build Service Connector is built around bookmarks of packages and projects. Bookmarks can be used to browse a project, its packages and its files. Additionally, you can view the configured repositories and adjust project paths and architectures.

    Individual packages or whole projects can be checked out directly from within Visual Studio Code to the file system similarly as one would do via osc. OBS’ version control is seamlessly integrated into Visual Studio Code’s Source Control module and can be used in a comparable fashion to the git extension.

  • Richard Brown: MicroOS Desktop, The Road to Daily Driving - LinuxReviews

    openSUSE Chairman and MicroOS Release Engineer Richard Brown presented OpenSUSE's minimal MicroOS Linux distribution as a potential desktop operating system at the openSUSE+LibreOffice Virtual Conference 2020 last week in a half an hour long presentation. MicroOS is a minimal Linux distribution primarily made for cloud services, IoT devices, containers and those types of use-cases. It could potentially also be used as a light desktop system similar to ChromeOS and an alpha version of MicroOS for Desktop is available. There are some problems to be solved on the road to a stable release as Richard Brown explains.

Kernel: Linux 5.10 and Linux 5.11 Changes

Filed under
Linux
  • Laptop Touchpad Improvements, New Joystick Driver For Linux 5.10 - Phoronix

    The Linux 5.10 merge window is closing this weekend but there still is new code landing for this last complete kernel series of 2020.

    The input subsystem updates were sent in on Friday morning and include some new drivers and other work. As previously reported, there is better support for newer Synaptics laptop touchpads with this kernel. There is Synaptics RMI4 F3A support for buttons on newer touchpads helping the likes of the ThinkPad X1 Extreme Gen1 and P1 Gen2. There is also InterTouch now enabled for the ThinkPad P1/X1E Gen2 devices.

  • Sensor Fusion Hub Driver For AMD Laptops With Gyroscopes Is Coming To Linux 5.11 - LinuxReviews

    It's been a long and hard road to acceptance for AMD's Sensor Fusion Hub Linux driver. The first revision was submitted to the Linux kernel Mailing List in January 2020. It took eight revisions and a lot of effort before Jiří Kosina finally accepted it into the hid.git#for-5.11 tree, almost guaranteeing that it will become a part of Linux 5.11.

    [...]

    Sandeep Singh didn't give up. He submitted a fourth revision with fingers crossed on February 12th, 2020. Intel's Linux driver engineer Andy Shevchenko rejected it on the grounds that it had long list of issues and concluded that it would need "a bit of work".

    Sandeep Singh sent a firth revision to the Linux Kernel Mailing List on the May 29th. Intel's Andy Shevchenko several additional objections and Sandeep Singh had to go back to the drawing-board.

  • AMD SFH Driver To Land With Linux 5.11 For Better Ryzen Laptop Handling In 2021 - Phoronix

    It was sadly too late for squeezing into the current Linux 5.10 merge window but it looks like for Linux 5.11 in early 2021 the AMD Sensor Fusion Hub "SFH" driver will make its long awaited debut.

    The AMD SFH driver is similar to the long-standing Intel ISH driver for supporting the sensor hub on modern laptops. The AMD SFH support is needed for laptops bearing gyroscopic sensors and other capabilities.

    Back in January AMD finally published the Sensor Fusion Hub Linux driver for supporting the Ryzen laptops of recent years. With time the driver was revised to address various feedback but wasn't quick to get picked up for mainline and at times several weeks passing between code revisions.

  • Intel Sends Linux Kernel Patches For VRR / Adaptive-Sync Enablement - Phoronix

    For months now Intel's open-source Linux driver stack has been preparing for VRR support with Gen11/Gen12 graphics. We've seen user-space patches by Intel around VRR while now they are finally sending out their key Linux kernel driver patches with the i915 DRM code.

    This kernel code is what's needed for actually enabling DisplayPort 1.4 Adaptive-Sync / Variable Refresh Rate on capable Intel graphics hardware with capable displays. The 11 patches add just under 300 lines of new code to their kernel driver in making the necessary VRR preparations and handling for this display feature.

Python Programming

Filed under
Development
  • Episode 32: Our New "Python Basics" Book & Filling the Gaps in Your Learning Path

    Do you have gaps in your Python learning path? If you're like me, you may have followed a completely random route to learn Python. This week on the show, David Amos is here to talk about the release of the Real Python book, "Python Basics: A Practical Introduction to Python 3". The book is designed not only to get beginners up to speed but also to help fill in the gaps many intermediate learners may still have.

  • Sentiment Analysis in Python With TextBlob

    In this article, we will take a look at how we can use the TextBlob library for sentiment analysis. We will also go through an example of how to analyze tweet sentiments.

  • Levene's & Bartlett's Test of Equality (Homogeneity) of Variance in Python

    Here you will learn how to carry out two tests for equality of variances in Python: Bartlett's test and Levene's Test

  • Python Code to Delete a File – Linux Hint

    We can use Python for performing various operations on file and directories, i.e., check the existence of files, verify the existence of directories, and remove the files and directories. Python provides a built-in operating system (OS) module for this purpose. By using the OS module, we can access the system files, directories, and we can delete them as well. Therefore, to perform any operation on file or directory, first, we need to import the OS module. In this article, we will learn to delete the file by using Python.

  • Check If File Exists in Python – Linux Hint

    Python provides a built-in operating system (OS) module that can be used to access OS files and directories. Any computer user often finds the need to check whether a file exists in a system. For example, suppose you are working on a file system and want to make sure that a file is available before performing any major operations on it. If you attempt to navigate or open a non-existent file, then this would cause an error. This article shows you how to use various Python file-checking mechanisms.

Is Albert going to be your loyal app assistant?

Filed under
Software

A light comic book repartee, right there, ha ha. So. Let's say you have a Linux desktop. What's the one thing missing? Apart from all the other things missing? Well, it's an integrated application launcher. Now, what I just said is incorrect. Because if you're using the Plasma desktop environment, you have Krunner, and you're all set like. Unity also has some elements of this goodness available.

If you're using other desktop environments, then there's isn't such functionality in the operating system really. And so Dedo reviews Ulauncher. Dedo gets emails. Emails say Dedo wrong. Dedo should review Albert. Dedo ponders and decides to blaze forth. After all, nailing down the formula for an omnipotent and actually useful desktop assistant is very hard. Often, it's a fad, a gimmick, an extra, but never something you embrace with heart and loin. Maychance Albert will convince us otherwise. To the cave.

[...]

Going into this experiment, I have to say I didn't expect to be mindblown. Because I know how difficult it is to create a really useful helper software. Even the mega-giants out there, with their multi-billion-dollar budgets can't do it right. But even if we keep our goal modest, Linux desktop wise, Krunner remains well ahead of the game, both in functionality and system integration.

Albert is okay. It works reasonably well, and it's no slouch. But the magic is getting the advanced functionality right. The basics are too trivial - and too overdone to matter. Also, I find the lack of a simple extensions management option tiring. I don't want to go about the net, manually downloading Python scripts and such. I don't have the time or the mental strength to commit to something like that, especially since the benefits aren't that big. The, there were also actual bugs and issues - like the hotkey binding, Firefox bookmarks and no built-in translation. For now, Albert is worth testing and playing with, but I don't see it becoming an indispensable household software any time soon.

Read more

Intel Xe Graphics' Incredible Performance Uplift From OpenCL To oneAPI Level Zero To Vulkan

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Since picking up the Dell XPS 13 9310 for delivering Tiger Lake Linux benchmarks, most of the focus so far has been about the overall processor performance while in this article is our first deep dive into the Gen12 Xe Graphics performance on Linux with Intel's fully open-source graphics and compute stack. Here is a look at how the Tiger Lake Xe Graphics performance is with the Core i7-1165G7 ranging from OpenGL and Vulkan graphics tests to OpenCL, oneAPI Level Zero, and Vulkan compute tests.

Read more

What’s New in Pop!_OS 20.10

Filed under
OS

Pop!_OS 20.10 is the result of fine-tuning features released in version 20.04. Continue on to see what we’ve added!

This addition also includes a new library for repository management, which adds features such as the ability to change the default system repository mirrors, reset mirrors to defaults, and change the names of your repositories.

Read more

EU Open Source Policy: good analysis, missing concrete next steps

Filed under
OSS

After the Commission's previous Open Source Strategy expired in 2017, we have waited three years for a new one. Instead of the hoped-for major step, which would reflect current developments around the debates on digital sovereignty and state of the art administration, the Commission has presented only a fig leaf. The benefits of Free Software are fully emphasised and the Commission is ambitious in its future use of Free Software. But concrete goals are rare, and a clear commitment to the use of Free Software is lacking. A failure of the strategy is foreseeable at this stage as the objectives are ambitious but the measures merely establish the status quo. Therefore, we call upon the Commission to present and implement concrete measures and activities in the coming weeks and months.

Read more

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More in Tux Machines

Devices/Embedded: Arduino and More

       
  • Arduino Blog » Driving a mini RC bumper car with a Nintendo Wii Balance Board

    Taking inspiration from Colin Furze’s 600cc bumper car constructed a few years ago, Henry Forsyth decided to build his own RC miniature version. His device features a 3D-printed and nicely-painted body, along with a laser-cut chassis that holds the electrical components. The vehicle is driven by a single gearmotor and a pair of 3D-printed wheels, with another caster-style wheel that’s turned left and right by a servo steering. An Arduino Uno and Bluetooth shield are used for overall control with a motor driver. The Bluetooth functionality allows for user interface via a PS4 controller, or even (after a bit of programming) a Wii Balance Board. In the end, the PS4 remote seems to be the better control option, but who knows where else this type of balance technique could be employed?

  • Intel Elkhart Lake COM’s offer up to 3x 2.5GbE, SIL2 functional safety
  • E3K all-in-one wireless bio-sensing platform supports EMG, ECG, and EEG sensors (Crowdfunding)

    Over the year, The maker community has designed several platforms to monitor vital signs with boards like Healthy Pi v4 or HeartyPatch both of which are powered by an ESP32 WiFi & Bluetooth wireless SoC. WallySci has designed another all-in-one wireless bio-sensing platform, called E3K, that also happens to be powered by Espressif Systems ESP32 chip, and can be connected to an electromyography (EMG) sensor to capture muscle movements, an electrocardiography (ECG) sensor to measure heart activity, and/or an electroencephalography (EEG) sensor to capture brain activity. The board also has an extra connector to connect a 9-axis IMU to capture motion.

  • Coffee Lake system can expand via M.2, mini-PCIe, PCIe, and Xpansion

    MiTac’s fanless, rugged “MX1-10FEP” embedded computer has an 8th or 9th Gen Coffee Lake Core or Xeon CPU plus 3x SATA bays, 4x USB 3.1 Gen 2, 2x M.2, 2x mini-PCIe, and optional PCIe x16 and x1. MiTac recently introduced a Coffee Lake based MX1-10FEP computer that is also being distributed by ICP Germany. This month, ICP announced that the MX1-10FEP-D model with PCIe x16 and PCIe x1 slots has been tested and classified by Nvidia as “NGC Ready” for Nvidia GPU Cloud graphics boards such as the Nvidia T4 and Tesla P4. [...] The MX1-10FEP has an Intel C246 chipset and defaults to Windows 10 with Linux on request.

Wine 5.20 Released

The Wine development release 5.20 is now available.

What's new in this release (see below for details):
  - More work on the DSS cryptographic provider.
  - A number of fixes for windowless RichEdit.
  - Support for FLS callbacks.
  - Window resizing in the new console host.
  - Various bug fixes.

The source is available from the following locations:

  https://dl.winehq.org/wine/source/5.x/wine-5.20.tar.xz
  http://mirrors.ibiblio.org/wine/source/5.x/wine-5.20.tar.xz

Binary packages for various distributions will be available from:

  https://www.winehq.org/download

You will find documentation on https://www.winehq.org/documentation

You can also get the current source directly from the git
repository. Check https://www.winehq.org/git for details.

Wine is available thanks to the work of many people. See the file
AUTHORS in the distribution for the complete list.
Read more Also: Wine 5.20 Released With Various Improvements For Running Windows Software On Linux

PostmarketOS update brings HDMI support for the PinePhone and PineTab

When the PinePhone postmarketOS Community Edition smartphone began shipping to customers in September it came with a version of the operating system with one important feature missing: HDMI output. So when my phone arrived a few weeks ago I was able to spend some time familiarizing myself with the operating system and I could plug in the included Convergence Dock to use USB accessories including a keyboard, mouse, and storage. But I wasn’t able to connect an external display. Now I can. Read more

today's howtos

  • How To Install Ubuntu 20.10 Groovy Gorilla

    This tutorial explains Ubuntu 20.10 Groovy Gorilla computer installation. You will prepare at least two disk partitions, finishing it all in about twenty minutes, and enjoy! Let's start right now.

  • How to install Ubuntu 20.10 - YouTube

    In this video, I am going to show how to install Ubuntu 20.10.

  • How To Install Webmin on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS - idroot

    In this tutorial we will show you how to install Webmin on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS, as well as some extra required packages by Webmin control panel

  • Running Ironic Standalone on RHEL | Adam Young’s Web Log

    This is only going to work if you have access to the OpenStack code. If you are not an OpenStack customer, you are going to need an evaluation entitlement. That is beyond the scope of this article.

  • Introduction to Ironic

    The sheer number of projects and problem domains covered by OpenStack was overwhelming. I never learned several of the other projects under the big tent. One project that is getting relevant to my day job is Ironic, the bare metal provisioning service. Here are my notes from spelunking the code.

  • Adding Nodes to Ironic

    TheJulia was kind enough to update the docs for Ironic to show me how to include IPMI information when creating nodes.

  • Secure NTP with NTS

    Many computers use the Network Time Protocol (NTP) to synchronize their system clocks over the internet. NTP is one of the few unsecured internet protocols still in common use. An attacker that can observe network traffic between a client and server can feed the client with bogus data and, depending on the client’s implementation and configuration, force it to set its system clock to any time and date. Some programs and services might not work if the client’s system clock is not accurate. For example, a web browser will not work correctly if the web servers’ certificates appear to be expired according to the client’s system clock. Use Network Time Security (NTS) to secure NTP. Fedora 331 is the first Fedora release to support NTS. NTS is a new authentication mechanism for NTP. It enables clients to verify that the packets they receive from the server have not been modified while in transit. The only thing an attacker can do when NTS is enabled is drop or delay packets. See RFC8915 for further details about NTS. NTP can be secured well with symmetric keys. Unfortunately, the server has to have a different key for each client and the keys have to be securely distributed. That might be practical with a private server on a local network, but it does not scale to a public server with millions of clients. NTS includes a Key Establishment (NTS-KE) protocol that automatically creates the encryption keys used between the server and its clients. It uses Transport Layer Security (TLS) on TCP port 4460. It is designed to scale to very large numbers of clients with a minimal impact on accuracy. The server does not need to keep any client-specific state. It provides clients with cookies, which are encrypted and contain the keys needed to authenticate the NTP packets. Privacy is one of the goals of NTS. The client gets a new cookie with each server response, so it doesn’t have to reuse cookies. This prevents passive observers from tracking clients migrating between networks.

  • Comfortable Motion: Absolutely Cursed Vim Scrolling - YouTube

    Have you ever felt like Vim was too useful and thought hey let's change that, well that's what this dev thought and now we have a plugin called comfortable motion that's adds physics based scrolling into vim, what's physics based scrolling you ask. Well it's scrolling that occurs based on how long you hold down the scroll key.

  • Running Cassandra on Fedora 32 | Adam Young’s Web Log

    This is not a tutorial. These are my running notes from getting Cassandra to run on Fedora 32. The debugging steps are interesting in their own right. I’ll provide a summary at the end for any sane enough not to read through the rest.

  • Recovering Audio off an Old Tape Using Audacity | Adam Young’s Web Log

    One of my fiorends wrote a bunch of music back in high school. The only remainig recordings are on a casette tape that he produced. Time has not been kind to the recordings, but they are audible…barely. He has a device that produces MP3s from the tape. My job has been to try and get them so that we can understand them well enough to recover the original songs. I have the combined recording on a single MP3. I’ve gone through and noted the times where each song starts and stops. I am going to go through the steps I’ve been using to go from that single long MP3 to an individual recording.

  • Role of Training and Certification at the Linux Foundation

    Open source allows anyone to dip their toes in the code, read up on the documentation, and learn everything on their own. That’s how most of us did it, but that’s just the first step. Those who want to have successful careers in building, maintaining, and managing IT infrastructures of companies need more structured hands-on learning with real-life experience. That’s where Linux Foundation’s Training and Certification unit enters the picture. It helps not only greenhorn developers but also members of the ecosystem who seek highly trained and certified engineers to manage their infrastructure. Swapnil Bhartiya sat down with Clyde Seepersad, SVP and GM of Training and Certification at the Linux Foundation, to learn more about the Foundation’s efforts to create a generation of qualified professionals.

  • Hetzner build machine

    This is part of a series of posts on compiling a custom version of Qt5 in order to develop for both amd64 and a Raspberry Pi. Building Qt5 takes a long time. The build server I was using had CPUs and RAM, but was very slow on I/O. I was very frustrated by that, and I started evaluating alternatives. I ended up setting up scripts to automatically provision a throwaway cloud server at Hetzner.