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Wednesday, 22 Sep 21 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Windows 11 will be the new Vista (or Windows 8) Roy Schestowitz 2 22/09/2021 - 8:58pm
Story Linux Foundation: PaSh, LFMS, and 'Studies' Roy Schestowitz 10 22/09/2021 - 8:55pm
Story Kernel: Google, Xen, and Mesa Roy Schestowitz 22/09/2021 - 8:53pm
Story Astro Pi Mk II, the New Raspberry Pi Hardware Headed to the Space Station Roy Schestowitz 22/09/2021 - 8:46pm
Story Building A Custom Linux Single Board Computer Just To Play Spotify Roy Schestowitz 1 22/09/2021 - 8:44pm
Story Graphics: X.Org Server 21.1 RC1, AMDGPU Linux Driver, and Xwayland Concern Roy Schestowitz 1 22/09/2021 - 8:41pm
Story Debian: EasyOS, Rust, TeX Live 2021 Roy Schestowitz 22/09/2021 - 8:32pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 22/09/2021 - 8:30pm
Story GNOME 41 Desktop Environment Officially Released, This Is What’s New Marius Nestor 5 22/09/2021 - 8:23pm
Story Maui Report – 15 Roy Schestowitz 22/09/2021 - 8:12pm

Kernel: Google, Xen, and Mesa

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • Google Finally Shifting To "Upstream First" Linux Kernel Approach For Android Features

    Google's Android had been notorious for all of its downstream patches carried by the mobile operating system as well as various vendor/device kernel trees while in recent years more of that code has been upstreamed. Google has also been shifting to the Android Generic Kernel Image (GKI) as the basis for all their product kernels to further reduce the fragmentation. Looking ahead, Google is now talking of an "upstream first" approach for pushing new kernel features.

    Google's Todd Kjos talked today during Linux Plumbers Conference (LPC2021) around their Generic Kernel Image initiative. With Android 12 and their Linux 5.10 based GKI image they have further cut down the fragmentation to the extent that it's "nearly eliminated". With the Android 12 GKI, most of the vendor/OEM kernel features have now either been upstreamed into the Linux kernel, isolated to vendor modules/hooks, or merged into the Android Common Kernel.

  • Google Finally Shifting To 'Upstream First' Linux Kernel Approach For Android Feature
  • Clang-format for Xen Coding Style Checking Scheduled - Xen Project

    At the moment there is no tool that would allow to format patches in Xen. The idea of Xen-checker is to use the clang-format approach as a base for Xen ‘checkpatch’ process. The new tool consists of modified .clang-format configuration file to automate Xen patches format checking and reformatting. The tool can be used as a pre-commit hook to check and format every patch automatically. Some features are missing in the clang configurator, so new clang-format options have been proposed for more flexible code formatting. Also, the purpose of the topic is to start the discussion about the existing rules for Xen code formatting to eliminate possible inaccuracies in the work of the Xen checker. This will make it easier to adhere to the unanimous decision.

  • Mesa Merge Pending For Vulkan Ray-Tracing On Older AMD GPUs - Phoronix

    Merged yesterday for Mesa 21.3 was open-source Vulkan ray-tracing for AMD RDNA2 / RX 6000 series GPUs with the RADV driver. Opened today now is a merge request that would provide Vulkan ray-tracing with RADV to pre-RDNA2 GPUs on this driver going back to the likes of Polaris, granted the performance is another story.

    Joshua Ashton known for his work on DXVK and other Direct3D-on-Vulkan efforts for Valve has opened the merge request to enable RADV Vulkan ray-tracing for older generations of AMD GPUs.

Astro Pi Mk II, the New Raspberry Pi Hardware Headed to the Space Station

Filed under
Hardware

While Izzy and Ed are still going strong, the ESA has decided it’s about time these veteran Raspberries finally get the retirement they’re due. Set to make the journey to the ISS in December aboard a SpaceX Cargo Dragon, the new Astro Pi MK II hardware looks quite similar to the original 2015 version at first glance. But a peek inside its 6063-grade aluminium flight case reveals plenty of new and improved gear, including a Raspberry Pi 4 Model B with 8 GB RAM.

The beefier hardware will no doubt be appreciated by students looking to push the envelope. While the majority of Python programs submitted to the Astro Pi program did little more than poll the current reading from the unit’s temperature or humidity sensors and scroll messages for the astronauts on the Astro Pi’s LED matrix, some of the more advanced projects were aimed at performing legitimate space research. From using the onboard camera to image the Earth and make weather predictions to attempting to map the planet’s magnetic field, code submitted from teams of older students will certainly benefit from the improved computational performance and expanded RAM of the newest Pi.

As with the original Astro Pi, the ESA and the Raspberry Pi Foundation have shared plenty of technical details about these space-rated Linux boxes. After all, students are expected to develop and test their code on essentially the same hardware down here on Earth before it gets beamed up to the orbiting computers. So let’s take a quick look at the new hardware inside Astro Pi MK II, and what sort of research it should enable for students in 2022 and beyond.

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Debian: EasyOS, Rust, TeX Live 2021

Filed under
Debian
  • nodejs compiled in OpenEmbedded

    I posted a couple of days ago about another attempt to compile Chromium. Learnt a lot from that. One thing, is that need the 'nodejs' package in the host OS.

  • Ian Jackson: Tricky compatibility issue - Rust's io::ErrorKind

    This post is about some changes recently made to Rust's ErrorKind, which aims to categorise OS errors in a portable way.

    [...]

    The Rust programming language tries to make it straightforward to write portable code. Portable error handling is always a bit tricky. One of Rust's facilities in this area is std::io::ErrorKind which is an enum which tries to categorise (and, sometimes, enumerate) OS errors. The idea is that a program can check the error kind, and handle the error accordingly.

    That these ErrorKinds are part of the Rust standard library means that to get this right, you don't need to delve down and get the actual underlying operating system error number, and write separate code for each platform you want to support. You can check whether the error is ErrorKind::NotFound (or whatever).

    Because ErrorKind is so important in many Rust APIs, some code which isn't really doing an OS call can still have to provide an ErrorKind. For this purpose, Rust provides a special category ErrorKind::Other, which doesn't correspond to any particular OS error.

  • Norbert Preining: TeX Live 2021 for Debian

    The release of TeX Live 2021 is already half a year away, but due to the delay of waiting for Debian/Bullseye release, we haven’t updated TeX Live in Debian for quite some time. But the waiting is over, today I uploaded the first packages of TeX Live 2021 to unstable.

today's howtos

Filed under
Gaming
  • How to Install Glances System Monitor on Linux Mint 20 - LinuxCapable

    Glances System Monitor is free, an open-source command-line tool for process monitoring, system resources such as CPU, Disk I/O, File System, Load Average, Memory, Network Interfaces and processes. Glances are built with Python language. Glances support cross-platform monitoring, which can be used in conjunction with a web-based interface.

    One of the excellent features Glances supports is the ability to set thresholds in the program. You can set careful, warning, and critical in the configuration file, which will then relay information in colors that can show alerts to systems resources bottlenecks, system resources issues, and much more. Glances, by default, comes with a pre-set list of colors, but you can modify and add additional configs.

  • How To Install OpenLDAP on Ubuntu 20.04 - idroot

    In this tutorial, we will show you how to install OpenLDAP on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS. For those of you who didn’t know, OpenLDAP (lightweight directory access protocol) provides user authentication and enables you to set up user accounts that provide the user access to each computer in your network without having to set up a local user account on each computer. OpenLDAP is the free and open-source implementation of LDAP.

    This article assumes you have at least basic knowledge of Linux, know how to use the shell, and most importantly, you host your site on your own VPS. The installation is quite simple and assumes you are running in the root account, if not you may need to add ‘sudo‘ to the commands to get root privileges. I will show you the step-by-step installation of the OpenLDAP on Ubuntu 20.04 (Focal Fossa). You can follow the same instructions for Ubuntu 18.04, 16.04, and any other Debian-based distribution like Linux Mint.

  • Add storage with LVM | Opensource.com

    Logical Volume Manager (LVM) allows for a layer of abstraction between the operating system and the hardware. Normally, your OS looks for disks (/dev/sda, /dev/sdb, and so on) and partitions within those disks (/dev/sda1, /dev/sdb1, and so on).

    In LVM, a virtual layer is created between the operating system and the disks. Instead of one drive holding some number of partitions, LVM creates a unified storage pool (called a Volume Group) that spans any number of physical drives (called Physical Volumes). Using the storage available in a Volume Group, LVM provides what appear to be disks and partitions to your OS.

    And the operating system is completely unaware that it's being "tricked."

  • Turn Your Old PC into an Access Point [Ed: Old article reposted]

    Got some older computer equipment lying around? Don’t throw away those old PCs just yet. Whether you’re cleaning out or upgrading the computers in the office or at home, you should be able to find something to do with them.

    As we’ll discuss, you can use them for experimentation, routing, security, file or Internet serving, and more. Use these five suggestions to make one of the projects your late-night endeavor on the weekend or your new project at work.

  • How to back up Linux apps and files on your Chromebook - TechRepublic

    If you've made the jump and installed Linux support on your Chromebook, you've probably already started installing apps and working with files and data. That being the case, you might be curious as to how you back up those apps and data. In some cases, you'll be saving data within the Linux filesystem hierarchy (and not on either your local or cloud storage, via Chrome OS.

    Fortunately, the Chrome OS developers thought of this, so you don't have to bother with locating that data and running commands to back it all up.

Windows 11 will be the new Vista (or Windows 8)

Filed under
Microsoft

I've been using Windows 10 in production for about two years now - testing it since even before the official release. Early on, my impression was that it was comparable to Windows 7. Okay. Nothing too special, new or revolutionary. Over time, this impression has changed. With subsequent semi-annual releases, I encountered issues I've never had in Windows before, mostly various system errors and bugs that speak of low quality and bad design. Then, Windows 10 would occasionally undo some of my tweaks and options, wasting my time, and forcing me to tighten the screws ever more. All in all, my outlook isn't bright or happy. Bored and exhausted by the nonsense would be the best word.

Now, Windows 11 is coming. As I've done many times in the past, I logged into my Insiders account and started testing, to see what awaits me. Right away, I found the experience quite dejecting. My early impression of Windows 11 Dev Build was mediocre at best, and it progressively got worse with each update. Different from Windows 10, though. What happened was, I found myself reliving 2011, when I tested Windows 8 and came to pretty much the same conclusions. To wit, this is what I think will unfold.

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Maui Report – 15

Filed under
Development
KDE

Maui 2 was released a month ago, and since then new features, bug fixes, and improvements have been made to the Maui set of apps and frameworks; the following blog post will cover some of the changes and highlights from the last or so months of development.

What’s new?

Among many bug fixes that will be listed below for each individual app, some of the highlights include better support for client-side decorations aka CSD. Clip, the video player, is now working again on Android; MauiKit Controls now provide improved contextual menu actions and a lighter tab bar styling. Index, the file manager, can now also preview PDF documents, adding up to support for previews of text, video, audio and fonts file types; and translucency support is now embedded into MauiKit itself.

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Overcoming the Challenges of Embracing Linux: a Different Perspective

Filed under
SUSE

After months of working at SUSE, my Jungle Green t-shirt was finally recognized at a store. “SUSE?” the gentleman asked, pointing at the large white letters.
“Yes, I work there!” I responded, thrilled that I had the opportunity to engage in our mutual love of the chameleon, Geeko, “But I don’t work on the technology, I’m in Program Management.”
“Well, let me ask you this – what is the operating system on your computer at home?” he asked, inquiring to my level of SUSE-ness.
“Just the basic… Microsoft,” I responded.
He continued, “I have a virtual machine with Slackware 1.0 I’m running, and I’ve been trying to get my hands on something old, openSUSE older than 5.3.”
I breathed a sigh of relief when our conversation was cut short and he ran off to help another customer. Slackware? Virtual Machine? All terms I had just enough exposure to know what category they belonged in, yet not enough to carry a conversation. Despite the embarrassment, I knew I wasn’t alone. A 2020 study by the AnitaB.org Institute found that women make up 28.8% of the tech workforce. When considering open source technology, this number further shrinks down to the single digits.
Nonetheless, the number of women becoming cloud native practitioners is growing. Recently, Lynne Chamberlain, CEO of SUSE Rancher Government Solutions, and Denise Schannon, Director of Engineering, joined special host Katie Gamanji for a special feature of OCTOpod in which they discussed their contributions to Linux, challenges they have faced and shared inspiring stories on how they’ve overcome those challenges to get to where they are today.

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Privacy-focused Linux Distributions to Secure Your Online Presence in 2021

Filed under
Linux
Security

Linux distros are usually more secure than their Windows and Mac counterparts. Linux Operating Systems being open-source leaves very less scope of unauthorized access to its core. However, with the advancement of technologies, incidents of attacks are not rare.

Are you in a fix with the coming reports of Linux systems targeted malware attacks? Worried about your online presence? Then maybe it’s time to go for a secure, privacy-focused Linux distro. This article presents a guide to 3 privacy-oriented Linux distributions that respect your privacy online.

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Stable Kernels: 5.14.7, 5.10.68, 5.4.148, 4.19.207, 4.14.247, 4.9.283, and 4.4.284

Filed under
Linux

I'm announcing the release of the 5.14.7 kernel.

All users of the 5.14 kernel series must upgrade.

The updated 5.14.y git tree can be found at:
	git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-5.14.y
and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser:
	https://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-s...

thanks,

greg k-h

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Also: Linux 5.10.68

Linux 5.4.148

Linux 4.19.207

Linux 4.14.247

Linux 4.9.283

Linux 4.4.284

i.MX8M Nano based mini-PC features Wirepas mesh networking

Filed under
Linux

SolidRun’s $221-and-up “SolidSense N8 IoT Compact” mini-PC runs Linux on an i.MX8M Nano Solo with GbE, WiFi/BT, USB, and a choice of LTE or PoE. You also get a choice of RS485 with CAN or BLE 5.0 with Wirepas Massive.

The SolidSense N8 IoT Compact embedded system follows SolidRun’s i.MX6-based SolidSense N6 Edge Gateway, which similarly offers a bundle of the Wirepas wireless mesh software from Tampere, Finland based Wirepas. The wireless mesh software, which is now called Wirepas Massive, is pre-installed along with software defined radios (SDRs) on two of the four i.MX8M Nano based SolidSense N8 models. Applications include IoT tasks such as automation, asset tracking, security, and smart buildings.

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AMD Ryzen processors are getting a performance boost on Linux

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

Chip giant AMD has shared details about a new driver that promises to improve the performance of its Zen-based processors on Linux.

According to reports, the new driver is the result of a joint collaboration between AMD and Valve, with the two companies toiling to enhance performance and power efficiency reportedly in preparation for the launch of the Steam Deck, Valve’s Zen 2-based take on portable gaming.

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Windowsfx is the Linux distribution Windows users have been looking for

Filed under
Linux

Over the past 20 or so years, there always seems to be that one distribution everyone claims is the best to help Windows users transition to Linux. Most often those distributions are nothing more than Linux with a desktop that looks like Windows. Sometimes they do a decent job of mimicking Windows and sometimes not.

But every so often something special pops up, a distribution that goes well beyond that extra mile to make Windows users feel right at home with Linux. Such is the case with Windowsfx. This Linux distribution is far from just a UI tweak to resemble another OS, it's perfectly tuned for Windows users. It looks like Windows 11, and it behaves like Windows 11... only it's Linux. For certain users, Windowsfx will be the absolute best of both worlds.

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The 3 Best Alternatives to Mandriva Linux

Filed under
Linux

Mandriva Linux has been discontinued for a long time now. Check out these three alternatives to relive the pure Mandriva experience.

Mandriva Linux is a fusion of Brazilian distribution Conectiva Linux and French distribution Mandrake Linux. It is developed by Mandriva S.A.; however, the company has not released any new version since 2011.

Although the distro has not been updated for a long time and considering the features it offered, it’s a little difficult to undermine its existence. Mandriva might not exist any longer, but its memories are still functional in the form of different Linux distros, discussed below.

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Building A Custom Linux Single Board Computer Just To Play Spotify

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

Housed inside a tidy little wooden enclosure of his own creation, the Spotify Box can turn any amplifier into a remote-controlled Spotify player via Spotify Connect. Pick the songs on your smartphone, and they?ll play from the Spotify Box as simple as that.

The project is based on the Allwinner V3S, a system-on-chip with a 1.2GHz ARM-Cortex-A7 core, 64MB of DDR2 RAM, and an Ethernet transceiver for good measure. There?s also a high-quality audio codec built in, making it perfect for this application. It?s thrown onto a four-layer PCB of [Evan?s] own design, and paired with a Wi-Fi and BlueTooth transceiver, RJ-45 and RCA jacks, a push-button and some LEDs. There?s also an SD card for storage.

With a custom Linux install brewed up using Buildroot, [Evan] was able to get a barebones system running Spotifyd while communicating with the network. With that done, it was as simple as hooking up the Spotify Box to an amp and grooving out to some tunes.

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Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Security updates for Wednesday

    Security updates have been issued by Debian (grilo), Fedora (curl, firefox, mingw-python-pillow, python-pillow, python2-pillow, and webkit2gtk3), openSUSE (chromium, grafana-piechart-panel, kernel, libcroco, php-composer, and xen), Oracle (curl, kernel, and nss and nspr), Red Hat (nodejs:12), Slackware (alpine), SUSE (ghostscript, grafana-piechart-panel, kernel, and xen), and Ubuntu (linux, linux-hwe, linux-hwe-5.11, linux-hwe-5.4, linux-raspi, linux-raspi-5.4, and linux-raspi2).

  • FBI held back ransomware decryption key from businesses to run operation targeting hackers [Ed: Microsoft Windows TCO]

    The FBI refrained for almost three weeks from helping to unlock the computers of hundreds of businesses and institutions hobbled by a major ransomware attack this summer, even though the bureau had secretly obtained the digital key needed to do so, according to several current and former U.S. officials.

  • FBI Had REvil's Kaseya Ransomware Decryption Key for Weeks: Report

    After the Kaseya attack, the feds somehow came into possession of a decryption key but waited nearly a month before delivering it into the hands of businesses.

  • FBI Had the REvil Decryption Key - Schneier on Security [Ed: Those "trade-offs" should include removing Windows altogether]

    Fighting ransomware is filled with security trade-offs. This is one I had not previously considered.

  • Ransomware Attacks Have Gone Stratospheric: Report [Ed: Overlooks the fact that many target Windows in particular; instead it focuses on "UNIX" and "Linux", which seems strange. What's the motivation? Meanwhile, mainstream media barely even mentions "Windows" when only Windows is impacted.]

    Positive Technologies on Wednesday released a report that indicates ransomware attacks have reached “stratospheric levels.”

  • Google Releases Security Updates for Chrome | CISA [Ed: Proprietary software]

    Google has released Chrome version 94.0.4606.54 for Windows, Mac, and Linux. This version addresses vulnerabilities that an attacker could exploit to take control of an affected system.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Windowsfx 11, a whole Linux flavored like Windows 11 and without the need for TPM - itsfoss.net

    Windowsfx 11 is the new version of another of the GNU / Linux distributions that try to bring the free system closer to Windows users using the fantastic possibilities of visual and interface customization of Linux.

    Windowsfx already had custom versions of Windows 7 and Windows 10 and before Microsoft publishes the final version of Windows 11 they already have the one dedicated to the new system. And it offers what is expected. Windowsfx 11 Preview for x86 adapts the user interface to what Windows 11 offers, the general visual appearance and icons, a new start menu or the default centered start panel, as well as using Wine 6 to run Windows applications.

  • Mecanum Omnidirectional Robot Car using the Quantum Integration System

    In this project, we’re going to be building a wireless robot car that uses mecanum wheels to enable omnidirectional movement. If you haven’t heard of mecanum wheels before, they’re tireless wheels with a series of rubberized rollers around the circumference.

  • Keeping things creative: Real-world learning from a remote perspective

    Teaching students complex concepts from a remote distance is something that many educators have had to get to grips with over the last 18 months. Especially where engineering is concerned. Keeping things hands-on and with a strong connection to real-world scenarios is vitally important for students to progress.

    We recently discovered this MathWorks mechatronics article by Mojtaba Azadi at the San Francisco State University. Azadi was able to create several different types of drawing robots using the Arduino Education Engineering Kit. Aiming to foster independent confidence and strengthen the skills and abilities of students, this project is perfect for those teaching outside of the classroom setting or when running courses online.

  • LibreOffice Conference 2021: How-to for participants

    The online LibreOffice Conference 2021 starts tomorrow! Here’s how to take part…

  • 17 Best Open-source Headless eCommerce Solutions

    A headless software is a program that can work and performs without a user interface. A headless Linux and a headless Google Chrome can perform seamlessly and smoothly without the need to run its GUI.

    Likewise, a headless web system is a functional web app but without a user interface. Developers often use a headless web app as a base to build mobile, desktop, web, and IoT apps.

  • Patch origin trust vs GitHub’s URL hierarchy

    Attentive readers may have noticed something a bit weird with the GitHub patch links in my last article. I shared links to two patches for Ruby's Rake build system which I also said hadn't yet been accepted into Rake. Yet, the patches looked like they came directly from the Rake project's official code repository at https://github.com/ruby/rake/. So, how did I get a patch URL that’s indistinguishable from commits/patches that are part of a project?

    [...]

    You could trick someone through social engineering to deploy a malicious patch that appears to legitimately have originated from a target project. All it would take to get a legitimate-looking URL is to open and close a pull request in the project. It’s not unheard of that large deployments receive an early heads up about critical security patches. The malicious source code and intent would then be public, but a quick “oops, that was stupid — honest mistake” comment on the pull request could be enough to defuse suspicions.

  • Best Free Alternatives to Microsoft Bing [Ed: Well, hardly anyone even uses this junk from Microsoft and the first 3 entries violate privacy, including DDG and Startpage. LinuxLinks spreads Microsoft misinformation about "embracing" Open Source by naming proprietary things like GitHub and Visual Studio Code (both proprietary). Very disappointing.]

    Microsoft’s stance for decades was that community creation and sharing of communal code (later to be known as free and open source software) represented a direct attack on their business. Their battle with Linux stretches back many years. Back in 2001, former Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer famously tarnished Linux “a cancer that attaches itself in an intellectual property sense to everything it touches”. Microsoft also initiated its “Get the Facts” marketing campaign from mid-2003, which specifically criticized Linux server usage, total cost of ownership, security, indemnification and reliability. The campaign was widely criticized for spreading misinformation.

IBM/Red Hat Leftovers

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Automating the implementation of system-wide crypto policies with RHEL System Roles

    Having properly configured and consistent cryptography settings across your Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) environment is a key part of system security. RHEL System Roles are a collection of Ansible roles and modules that are included in RHEL to help provide consistent workflows and streamline the execution of manual tasks.

    The crypto_policies RHEL System Role can help you quickly and easily implement system-wide crypto policies across your RHEL environment. The crypto_policies role can also be used to check the current status of system-wide crypto policies in your environment.

    In this post, we show you how you can utilize the crypto-policies RHEL System Role to automate the configuration across your RHEL environment.

  • Red Hat offers various free fundamentals and just-in-time learning opportunities

    It is no secret that organizations value candidates who demonstrate a commitment to staying abreast of new technologies and industry trends. A recent IDC whitepaper sponsored by Red Hat, "The Business Value of Red Hat Training," revealed that trained IT staff see greater productivity, risk mitigation and a reduction in IT infrastructure costs.

    When it comes to team onboarding, job readiness increased by 76% when new team members had already completed Red Hat training prior to joining, and by more than half (55%) in cases where they were trained as part of the onboarding process.

    Clearly, training and certification increases marketability of job candidates in a competitive employment landscape. Unfortunately, barriers persist in accessing quality training, as it can often present as cost-prohibitive for individuals who may not have educational opportunities sponsored by their employer. Red Hat Training and Certification is dedicated to making open source learning accessible to those who are interested in upskilling and improving their technical expertise and professional skills.

  • Try out our new API developer playground: Accelerating technology exploration and app development with Developer Playground on IBM API Hub – IBM Developer

    In February, we introduced the IBM API Hub as a way for developers to access trusted, secure API-enabled services and data. With access to these APIs, developers were able to more quickly build the solutions they needed.

    Since the introduction of the API Hub, we’ve heard from our developer community: Being able to discover and learn about APIs and try out their endpoints is good. Being able to easily play with the APIs within a free playground environment would be even better.

  • No-cost IBM Semeru Runtime Certified Edition 11 now available for all Java developers and deployments

    Following on from our recent introduction of the no-cost IBM Semeru Runtimes to develop and run Java applications, IBM is announcing the availability of IBM Semeru Runtime Certified Edition 11, previously known as IBM SDK, Java Technology Edition, 11.

    IBM Semeru Runtime Certified Edition includes the same OpenJDK class libraries and Eclipse OpenJ9 Java Virtual Machine as the Open Edition, and provides 100-percent compatibility. The Certified Edition has an IBM license, is Java TCK (Technology Compatibility Kit)-certified, and is available at no cost for you to write, build, and deploy Java applications in development or for production environments. It is available on Linux and AIX platforms for long-term support (LTS) Java releases, starting with Java 11.

    With the release of IBM Semeru Runtime Certified Edition, we are providing flexibility to IBM customers and Java users with the choice of licenses to use a Java runtime that is low and efficient in memory consumption, offers great performance, and is optimized for cloud and container-based deployments. If you prefer an IBM-licensed version with TCK certification, you can use the Certified Edition. If you prefer an open source (GPLv2 plus Classpath Exception) licensed version without need for TCK certification, you can use the Open Edition.

  • Thoth prescriptions for resolving Python dependencies

    Python offers a wealth of programming libraries, which often invoke functions from other libraries in complex hierarchies. While these libraries make it possible to develop powerful applications quickly, the ever-changing library versions often introduce conflicts that cause runtime or build-time issues. Thoth, an open source project developed within the Artificial Intelligence Center of Excellence (AICoE), is dedicated to alleviating this problem in Python programs. This article looks at Thoth prescriptions, a mechanism that you can use to avoid clashing library versions in your Python applications.

  • IT hiring: 4 ways to keep it human | The Enterprisers Project

    Companies have been using technology to recruit and hire employees for many years, but COVID has made digital recruiting indispensable. It is the only option when in-person interaction is limited, and it enables recruiters to search more broadly and efficiently as remote work becomes more standard.

    Meanwhile, today’s red-hot job market is forcing organizations to be even more proactive and specific in finding the people they need to meet near-term business objectives, address cultural diversity, and prepare for long-term success. Furthermore, we have entered a new phase of digital recruiting by using artificial intelligence to find and assess candidates before a human even enters the process.

    The result is that the hiring process is quickly becoming almost entirely digital. From recruiting to interviewing to onboarding, a company and a prospective or new employee may never see each other in person.

Audiocasts/Shows: Manjaro 21.1.3 GNOME Edition, mintCast, LINUX Unplugged

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Software: Matrix, Ktube, and Monero P2Pool

Filed under
Software

  • Chat Bubbles on Element and Several Matrix Apps

    This simple comparison wants to help everyone adopt alternative messaging technology, Matrix, with suitable user interface to them. We call Matrix Apps to instant messengers like Element, Fluffy, Nheko, Schildi and Spectral as they are created based upon the said technology. We will start by setting up criteria first that includes chat bubbles, then going through these messengers one by one, and you will see their pictures here along with a little comments from me. I hope you can pick up the messenger with UI you love the most from here.

  • Ktube Media Downloader lets you download YouTube videos easily on Linux

    I always like to tell people about how I have been using Linux as my primary operating system for over ten years. I love Linux, I understand it, it’s free and above all, it fits my workflow in a way Microsoft’s Windows (with all its goodness) probably never will. That also means I love and am a command-line ninja but I also know one thing, a lot of people out there fear and hate the command line.

  • Monero P2Pool V1.0 Is Released

    The latest version of P2Pool, a decentralized Monero mining pool has released. This is the first official release, signaling an invitation for more users to try out the new software.

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today's howtos

  • How to Install Glances System Monitor on Linux Mint 20 - LinuxCapable

    Glances System Monitor is free, an open-source command-line tool for process monitoring, system resources such as CPU, Disk I/O, File System, Load Average, Memory, Network Interfaces and processes. Glances are built with Python language. Glances support cross-platform monitoring, which can be used in conjunction with a web-based interface. One of the excellent features Glances supports is the ability to set thresholds in the program. You can set careful, warning, and critical in the configuration file, which will then relay information in colors that can show alerts to systems resources bottlenecks, system resources issues, and much more. Glances, by default, comes with a pre-set list of colors, but you can modify and add additional configs.

  • How To Install OpenLDAP on Ubuntu 20.04 - idroot

    In this tutorial, we will show you how to install OpenLDAP on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS. For those of you who didn’t know, OpenLDAP (lightweight directory access protocol) provides user authentication and enables you to set up user accounts that provide the user access to each computer in your network without having to set up a local user account on each computer. OpenLDAP is the free and open-source implementation of LDAP. This article assumes you have at least basic knowledge of Linux, know how to use the shell, and most importantly, you host your site on your own VPS. The installation is quite simple and assumes you are running in the root account, if not you may need to add ‘sudo‘ to the commands to get root privileges. I will show you the step-by-step installation of the OpenLDAP on Ubuntu 20.04 (Focal Fossa). You can follow the same instructions for Ubuntu 18.04, 16.04, and any other Debian-based distribution like Linux Mint.

  • Add storage with LVM | Opensource.com

    Logical Volume Manager (LVM) allows for a layer of abstraction between the operating system and the hardware. Normally, your OS looks for disks (/dev/sda, /dev/sdb, and so on) and partitions within those disks (/dev/sda1, /dev/sdb1, and so on). In LVM, a virtual layer is created between the operating system and the disks. Instead of one drive holding some number of partitions, LVM creates a unified storage pool (called a Volume Group) that spans any number of physical drives (called Physical Volumes). Using the storage available in a Volume Group, LVM provides what appear to be disks and partitions to your OS. And the operating system is completely unaware that it's being "tricked."

  • Turn Your Old PC into an Access Point [Ed: Old article reposted]

    Got some older computer equipment lying around? Don’t throw away those old PCs just yet. Whether you’re cleaning out or upgrading the computers in the office or at home, you should be able to find something to do with them. As we’ll discuss, you can use them for experimentation, routing, security, file or Internet serving, and more. Use these five suggestions to make one of the projects your late-night endeavor on the weekend or your new project at work.

  • How to back up Linux apps and files on your Chromebook - TechRepublic

    If you've made the jump and installed Linux support on your Chromebook, you've probably already started installing apps and working with files and data. That being the case, you might be curious as to how you back up those apps and data. In some cases, you'll be saving data within the Linux filesystem hierarchy (and not on either your local or cloud storage, via Chrome OS. Fortunately, the Chrome OS developers thought of this, so you don't have to bother with locating that data and running commands to back it all up.

Windows 11 will be the new Vista (or Windows 8)

I've been using Windows 10 in production for about two years now - testing it since even before the official release. Early on, my impression was that it was comparable to Windows 7. Okay. Nothing too special, new or revolutionary. Over time, this impression has changed. With subsequent semi-annual releases, I encountered issues I've never had in Windows before, mostly various system errors and bugs that speak of low quality and bad design. Then, Windows 10 would occasionally undo some of my tweaks and options, wasting my time, and forcing me to tighten the screws ever more. All in all, my outlook isn't bright or happy. Bored and exhausted by the nonsense would be the best word. Now, Windows 11 is coming. As I've done many times in the past, I logged into my Insiders account and started testing, to see what awaits me. Right away, I found the experience quite dejecting. My early impression of Windows 11 Dev Build was mediocre at best, and it progressively got worse with each update. Different from Windows 10, though. What happened was, I found myself reliving 2011, when I tested Windows 8 and came to pretty much the same conclusions. To wit, this is what I think will unfold. Read more

Maui Report – 15

Maui 2 was released a month ago, and since then new features, bug fixes, and improvements have been made to the Maui set of apps and frameworks; the following blog post will cover some of the changes and highlights from the last or so months of development. What’s new? Among many bug fixes that will be listed below for each individual app, some of the highlights include better support for client-side decorations aka CSD. Clip, the video player, is now working again on Android; MauiKit Controls now provide improved contextual menu actions and a lighter tab bar styling. Index, the file manager, can now also preview PDF documents, adding up to support for previews of text, video, audio and fonts file types; and translucency support is now embedded into MauiKit itself. Read more

Overcoming the Challenges of Embracing Linux: a Different Perspective

After months of working at SUSE, my Jungle Green t-shirt was finally recognized at a store. “SUSE?” the gentleman asked, pointing at the large white letters. “Yes, I work there!” I responded, thrilled that I had the opportunity to engage in our mutual love of the chameleon, Geeko, “But I don’t work on the technology, I’m in Program Management.” “Well, let me ask you this – what is the operating system on your computer at home?” he asked, inquiring to my level of SUSE-ness. “Just the basic… Microsoft,” I responded. He continued, “I have a virtual machine with Slackware 1.0 I’m running, and I’ve been trying to get my hands on something old, openSUSE older than 5.3.” I breathed a sigh of relief when our conversation was cut short and he ran off to help another customer. Slackware? Virtual Machine? All terms I had just enough exposure to know what category they belonged in, yet not enough to carry a conversation. Despite the embarrassment, I knew I wasn’t alone. A 2020 study by the AnitaB.org Institute found that women make up 28.8% of the tech workforce. When considering open source technology, this number further shrinks down to the single digits. Nonetheless, the number of women becoming cloud native practitioners is growing. Recently, Lynne Chamberlain, CEO of SUSE Rancher Government Solutions, and Denise Schannon, Director of Engineering, joined special host Katie Gamanji for a special feature of OCTOpod in which they discussed their contributions to Linux, challenges they have faced and shared inspiring stories on how they’ve overcome those challenges to get to where they are today. Read more