Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Thursday, 28 Jan 21 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story The Demise of Chromium as Free Software Roy Schestowitz 4 28/01/2021 - 2:07pm
Story New Linux Kernel Vulnerabilities Patched in All Supported Ubuntu Releases Marius Nestor 28/01/2021 - 12:43pm
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 28/01/2021 - 12:11pm
Story Cluster Server R2 2U rack cluster server ships with up to 72 Rockchip RK3399/RK3328 SoMs Rianne Schestowitz 28/01/2021 - 11:56am
Story How to Get Install Docker On Ubuntu 20.04 LTS trendoceangd 28/01/2021 - 10:29am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 28/01/2021 - 10:16am
Story Getting Started with Raspberry Pi Pico using MicroPython and C Rianne Schestowitz 3 28/01/2021 - 10:15am
Story Another Sudo Root Privilege Escalation Vulnerability Got Patched, Update Now Marius Nestor 13 28/01/2021 - 7:33am
Story Contributing to KDE is easier than you think – Bug triaging Rianne Schestowitz 28/01/2021 - 6:52am
Story Audiocasts/Shows: Coder Radio, TLLTS, and FLOSS Weekly Roy Schestowitz 28/01/2021 - 6:14am

New Linux Kernel Vulnerabilities Patched in All Supported Ubuntu Releases

Filed under
Security

It would appear that a serious vulnerability is affecting most GNU/Linux distributions running a Linux kernel before version 5.10.7. The flaw (CVE-2020-28374) was discovered in Linux kernel’s LIO SCSI target implementation and could allow a remote attacker with access to at least one iSCSI LUN in a multiple backstore environment to expose sensitive information or modify data.

This flaw was patched today in Ubuntu 20.10 (Groovy Gorilla) systems running Linux kernel 5.8, Ubuntu 20.04 LTS (Focal Fossa) systems running Linux kernel 5.4, Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) systems running Linux kernel 5.4 or 4.15, as well as Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) and Ubuntu 14.04 ESM systems running Linux kernel 4.4.

Read more

Cluster Server R2 2U rack cluster server ships with up to 72 Rockchip RK3399/RK3328 SoMs

Filed under
Android
Linux
Hardware
Ubuntu

Rockchip RK3399 and RK3328 are typically used in Chromebooks, single board computers, TV boxes, and all sort of AIoT devices, but if you ever wanted to create a cluster based on those processor, Firefly Cluster Server R2 leverages the company’s RK3399, RK3328, or even RK1808 NPU SoM to bring 72 modules to a 2U rack cluster server enclosure, for a total of up to 432 Arm Cortex-A72/A53 cores, 288 GB RAM, and 18 3.5-inch hard drives.

Firefly says the cluster can run Android, Ubuntu, or some other Linux distributions. Typical use cases include “cloud phone”, virtual desktop, edge computing, cloud gaming, cloud storage, blockchain, multi-channel video decoding, app cloning, etc. When fitted with the AI accelerators, it looks similar to Solidrun Janux GS31 Edge AI server designed for real-time inference on multiple video streams for the monitoring of smart cities & infrastructure, intelligent enterprise/industrial video surveillance, object detection, recognition & classification, smart visual analysis, and more. There’s no Wiki for Cluster Server R2 just yet, but you may find some relevant information on the Wiki for an earlier generation of the cluster server.

Read more

How to Get Install Docker On Ubuntu 20.04 LTS

Filed under
Linux

Docker is an Open source technology that allows you to install an run application on several containers (machine) without Interfering with the host or other containers technology is similar to Virtualization, but it is more portable and easy to use.

What is the type of Docker are available?
There is two types of Docker are available Docker CE (Community Edition) and Docker EE (Enterprise Edition).

Read more

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos
  • Simple router setup with nftables

    Router setup in linux is fun and important for situations when you have only server, computer. Forwarding, firewall rules and at least 2 network interface cards is the minimal requiremnt for setting up router. Our router setup will be on Rhel 8. The installation and configuration steps are: [...]

  • find mostly doesn't need xargs today on modern Unixes

    For usage with find, all of this is unnecessary on a modern Unix and has been for some time, because find folded this into itself. Modern versions of find don't have just the traditional '-exec', which runs one command per file, but also an augmented version of it which aggregates the arguments together like xargs does. This augmented version is used by ending the '-exec' with '+' instead of ';', like so: [...]

  • Linux fmt Command – Formatting Text on the Command Line

    The fmt command is a text utility included in the GNU Core Utilities. It was originally created to format email messages at the command line. However, it can be very useful for reading any text files in the terminal. Sure, modern terminals will wrap text to fit in the window. But they don’t wrap at a word, it could split a word right down the middle. This makes it hard to read and even harder to keep your place.

  • How To Install Observium on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS - idroot

    In this tutorial, we will show you how to install Observium on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS. For those of you who didn’t know, Observium is a Network Management and Monitoring System that collects data from multiple devices using SNMP and allows you to monitor all of the network’s devices via an easy-to-use interface. It is PHP-based and uses a MySQL database to store data.

    This article assumes you have at least basic knowledge of Linux, know how to use the shell, and most importantly, you host your site on your own VPS. The installation is quite simple and assumes you are running in the root account, if not you may need to add ‘sudo‘ to the commands to get root privileges. I will show you through the step by step installation of Observium on Ubuntu 20.04 (Focal Fossa). You can follow the same instructions for Ubuntu 18.04, 16.04, and any other Debian based distribution like Linux Mint.

  • How to Exclude Specific File Extension While Copying Files Recursively

    As you might already know, ‘cp’ is the command line program in Linux to copy files and directories.

Contributing to KDE is easier than you think – Bug triaging

Filed under
KDE

Today, 2021-01-28, is the Plasma Beta Review Day for Plasma 5.21, that is to say, Plasma 5.20.90. Right now it’s a bit after 2 a.m., so after this I’m going to bed so I can be present later.

This month I’ve mostly been enjoying my post-job vacation as last year I was bordering burnout. As such I didn’t help much.

Before bed I’ll be providing a few things I’ve learned about triaging, though. While this blog post isn’t specifically about the Beta Review Day, this should make the general bug triaging process clearer for you, making it quite timely.

Read more

Audiocasts/Shows: Coder Radio, TLLTS, and FLOSS Weekly

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Testing the Test | Coder Radio 398

    The guys can't help but laugh when they hear the test tests one well-known online giant is testing. You might say they get a bit testy.

  • The Linux Link Tech Show Episode 891

    brave browser, gnome 40, lottalinuxlinks is back, tablets

  • FLOSS Weekly 614: Ethics and Open Source - Openbase, Elastic vs AWS

    Matt Asay believes we need a new way to think about open source. This comes on the heels of the Elastic vs AWS controversy. Shawn Powers and new co-host Katherine Druckman join Doc Searls in a lively discussion of ethics and open source on FLOSS Weekly. The panel takes a look at three efforts currently making news: the Ethical Source Movement; Matt Asay's Infoworld post titled A New Way To Think About Open Source; and Openbase, which Venturebeat says "wants to be the Yelp for open source software packages."

Quick Look at Redcore Linux 2101 Beta

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Every once in a while I try Gentoo Linux or something based on it. Redcore Linux is one of those few distributions that made it their mission to "bring the power of Gentoo Linux to the masses". To achieve this it provides a repository of pre-built binary packages on a system that updates on a rolling basis. "Redcore Linux is built from Gentoo Linux stage3. We then add a kernel, a bootloader and a few other things like dbus and initramfs generator (Dracut), we configure the init system (OpenRC) and so we have the core of Redcore Linux, a Gentoo Linux stage4 if you will."
A beta build of Redcore 2101 was released only a few days ago that the team apparently feel so confident about that they even think it may be better than some of their earlier stable releases. Given the nature of this distribution one can be sure this is fairly up to date.

Redcore beta is using Linux 5.10.5, GCC 10.2.0, Glibc 2.32, binutils 2.35, LLVM 11.0.1, mesa 20.3.2, libdrm 2.4.103, xorg-server 1.20.10, qt 5.15.2, kde-frameworks 5.77, kde-apps 20.12.1, kde-plasma 5.20.5 and flatpak support. The init in use is OpenRC.

Redcore provides what's called a hardened Linux system to reduce the available attack surface of the OS. The file Redcore.Linux.Hardened.2101.KDE.amd64.BETA.iso is 3.7 GB in size to download. Despite being hardened the system is supposed to work and targets "casual Laptop/Desktop users and, to some extent, Workstation power users".

Read more

EasyOS Dunfell 2.6.1 released for x86_64 PC

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Yesterday announced EasyOS Dunfell 2.6.1 aarch64 for the Raspberry Pi4:

https://bkhome.org/news/202101/easyos-dunfell-261-released-for-the-raspberry-pi4.html

Today it is the turn for EasyOS Dunfell-series 2.6.1 64-bit on the PC. This is the first official release in this series.

Same packages compiled in OpenEmbedded. Latest SeaMonkey 2.53.6. A different kernel for the PC build, 5.10.11.

Read all about it here:

http://distro.ibiblio.org/easyos/amd64/releases/dunfell/2.6.1/release-notes-2.6.1.htm

As stated in the release notes, all three streams are being sync'ed to the same version number.

The Buster-series 2.6.1 will probably be uploaded tomorrow. I have to compile the latest 5.4.x kernel, and SeaMonkey 2.53.6.

As to which you would choose for the PC, it is like asking "which is better, strawberry icecream or chocolate icecream?"

Read more

Top 20 Uses of Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux

The Linux OS and its related distros and flavors have transformed it from hardcore software into an industrial brand. Even if you are not a fan of it, the Linux OS might be as common as the air you breathe if you closely analyze your day to day interactive activities. Almost all the modern technologies that transform and innovate the tech industry have a Linux OS DNA imprinted on them.

Those that are yet to be branded with their innovative uniqueness and recognition are waiting in line for the famed chance. Therefore, you might boldly claim that the Linux OS does not run your life, but the world around you cannot avoid the flirty pursuits of this open-source and free software.

Nowadays, almost anything that can be described as cool is either pursuing Linux or is being pursued by Linux. It is the perfect symbiotic relationship in a world that tries to find a balance in technology and innovation. This article explores the awesomeness and outreach of the Linux OS in the world around us. It might even be an eye-opener for some of us to start taking our Linux skills to the next level. Top500 quotes Linux as the powerhouse or engine behind five-hundred fastest computers worldwide.

I do not know of the speed of the computer composing this article or whether it qualifies to be among the listed five-hundred fastest computers worldwide. However, one thing is certain; it is 100% Linux DNA. On this note, let us start parading the top 20 uses of Linux.

Read more

parted-3.4 released [stable]

Filed under
GNU

Parted 3.4 has been released.  This release includes many bug fixes and new features. 
Here is Parted's home page: 
    http://www.gnu.org/software/parted/ 
For a summary of all changes and contributors, see: 
  https://git.savannah.gnu.org/cgit/parted.git/log/?h=v3.4 
or run this command from a git-cloned parted directory: 
  git shortlog v3.3..v3.4 (appended below) 
Here are the compressed sources and a GPG detached signature[*]: 
  http://ftp.gnu.org/gnu/parted/parted-3.4.tar.xz 
  http://ftp.gnu.org/gnu/parted/parted-3.4.tar.xz.sig 
Use a mirror for higher download bandwidth: 
  https://www.gnu.org/order/ftp.html 
[*] Use a .sig file to verify that the corresponding file (without the 
.sig suffix) is intact.  First, be sure to download both the .sig file 
and the corresponding tarball.  Then, run a command like this: 
  gpg --verify parted-3.4.tar.xz.sig 
If that command fails because you don't have the required public key, 
then run this command to import it: 
  gpg --keyserver keys.gnupg.net --recv-keys 117E8C168EFE3A7F 
and rerun the 'gpg --verify' command. 
This release was bootstrapped with the following tools: 
  Autoconf 2.69 
  Automake 1.16.1 
  Gettext 0.21 
  Gnulib v0.1-4131-g252c4d944a 
  Gperf 3.1 

Read more

Kernel: LWN's Latest and IO_uring Patches

Filed under
Linux
  • Resource limits in user namespaces

    User namespaces provide a number of interesting challenges for the kernel. They give a user the illusion of owning the system, but must still operate within the restrictions that apply outside of the namespace. Resource limits represent one type of restriction that, it seems, is proving too restrictive for some users. This patch set from Alexey Gladkov attempts to address the problem by way of a not-entirely-obvious approach.

    Consider the following use case, as stated in the patch series. Some user wants to run a service that is known not to fork within a container. As a way of constraining that service, the user sets the resource limit for the number of processes to one, explicitly preventing the process from forking. That limit is global, though, so if this user tries to run two containers with that service, the second one will exceed the limit and fail to start. As a result, our user becomes depressed and considers a career change to goat farming.

    Clearly, what is needed is a way to make at least some resource limits apply on per-container basis; then each container could run its service with the process limit set to one and everybody will be happy (except perhaps the goats).

  • Fast commits for ext4

    The Linux 5.10 release included a change that is expected to significantly increase the performance of the ext4 filesystem; it goes by the name "fast commits" and introduces a new, lighter-weight journaling method. Let us look into how the feature works, who can benefit from it, and when its use may be appropriate.

    Ext4 is a journaling filesystem, designed to ensure that filesystem structures appear consistent on disk at all times. A single filesystem operation (from the user's point of view) may require multiple changes in the filesystem, which will only be coherent after all of those changes are present on the disk. If a power failure or a system crash happens in the middle of those operations, corruption of the data and filesystem structure (including unrelated files) is possible. Journaling prevents corruption by maintaining a log of transactions in a separate journal on disk. In case of a power failure, the recovery procedure can replay the journal and restore the filesystem to a consistent state.

    The ext4 journal includes the metadata changes associated with an operation, but not necessarily the related data changes. Mount options can be used to select one of three journaling modes, as described in the ext4 kernel documentation. data=ordered, the default, causes ext4 to write all data before committing the associated metadata to the journal. It does not put the data itself into the journal. The data=journal option, instead, causes all data to be written to the journal before it is put into the main filesystem; as a side effect, it disables delayed allocation and direct-I/O support. Finally, data=writeback relaxes the constraints, allowing data to be written to the filesystem after the metadata has been committed to the journal.

    Another important ext4 feature is delayed allocation, where the filesystem defers the allocation of blocks on disk for data written by applications until that data is actually written to disk. The idea is to wait until the application finishes its operations on the file, then allocate the actual number of data blocks needed on the disk at once. This optimization limits unneeded operations related to short-lived, small files, batches large writes, and helps ensure that data space is allocated contiguously. On the other hand, the writing of data to disk might be delayed (with the default settings) by a minute or so. In the default data=ordered mode, where the journal entry is written only after flushing all pending data, delayed allocation might thus delay the writing of the journal. To assure data is actually written to disk, applications use the fsync() or fdatasync() system calls, causing the data (and the journal) to be written immediately.

  • MAINTAINERS truth and fiction

    Since the release of the 5.5 kernel in January 2020, there have been almost 87,000 patches from just short of 4,600 developers merged into the mainline repository. Reviewing all of those patches would be a tall order for even the most prolific of kernel developers, so decisions on patch acceptance are delegated to a long list of subsystem maintainers, each of whom takes partial or full responsibility for a specific portion of the kernel. These maintainers are documented in a file called, surprisingly, MAINTAINERS. But the MAINTAINERS file, too, must be maintained; how well does it reflect reality?

    The MAINTAINERS file doesn't exist just to give credit to maintainers; developers make use of it to know where to send patches. The get_maintainer.pl script automates this process by looking at the files modified by a patch and generating a list of email addresses to send it to. Given that misinformation in this file can send patches astray, one would expect it to be kept up-to-date. Recently, your editor received a suggestion from Jakub Kicinski that there may be insights to be gleaned from comparing MAINTAINERS entries against activity in the real world. A bit of Python bashing later, a new analysis script was born.

  • Experimental Patches Allow For New Ioctls To Be Built Over IO_uring

    IO_uring continues to be one of the most exciting technical innovations in the Linux kernel in recent years not only for more performant I/O but also opening up other doors for new Linux innovations. IO_uring has continued adding features since being mainlined in 2019 and now the newest proposed feature is the ability to build new ioctls / kernel interfaces atop IO_uring.

    The idea of supporting kernel ioctls over IO_uring has been brought up in the past and today lead IO_uring developer Jens Axboe sent out his initial patches. These initial patches are considered experimental and sent out as "request for comments" - they provide the infrastructure to provide a file private command type with IO_uring handling the passing of the arbitrary data.

Installing Debian on modern hardware

Filed under
Debian

It is an unfortunate fact of life that non-free firmware blobs are required to use some hardware, such as network devices (WiFi in particular), audio peripherals, and video cards. Beyond that, those blobs may even be required in order to install a Linux distribution, so an installation over the network may need to get non-free firmware directly from the installation media. That, as might be guessed, is a bit of a problem for distributions that are not willing to officially ship said firmware because of its non-free status, as a recent discussion in the Debian community shows.

Surely Dan Pal did not expect the torrent of responses he received to his short note to the debian-devel mailing list about problems he encountered trying to install Debian. He wanted to install the distribution on a laptop that was running Windows 10, but could not use the normal network installation mechanism because the WiFi device required non-free firmware. He tracked down the DVD version of the distribution and installed that, but worried that Debian is shooting itself in the foot by not prominently offering more installation options: "The current policy of hiding other versions of Debian is limiting the adoption of your OS by people like me who are interested in moving from Windows 10."

The front page at debian.org currently has a prominent "Download" button that starts to retrieve a network install ("netinst") CD image when clicked. But that image will not be terribly useful for systems that need non-free firmware to make the network adapter work. Worse yet, it is "impossible to find" a working netinst image with non-free firmware, Sven Joachim said, though he was overstating things a bit. Alexis Murzeau suggested adding a link under the big download button that would lead users to alternate images containing non-free firmware. He also pointed out that there are two open bugs (one from 2010 and another from 2016) that are related, so the problem is hardly a new one.

Read more

Wayland 1.19 Released With Small Protocol Updates, Fixes

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Wayland 1.18 released back in February 2020 while now nearly one year later it's been succeeded by Wayland 1.19.

Even with one year passing, Wayland 1.19 is a very minor update over Wayland 1.18. That's part of the reason why they moved off timed releases in the first place was the core Wayland code and protocol being quite stable at this point: there is very little change. Most of the work remaining to get Wayland ready for production use across all workloads is on the compositor side with KDE Plasma's KWin seeing improvements, GNOME Shell + Mutter being in very good shape, etc. There is also the driver obstacle of the NVIDIA proprietary driver support at the moment not being ideal but improvements are pending there. That is all outside of the core Wayland code itself that is the protocol and key libraries.

Read more

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android

Stable Kernels: 5.10.11, 5.4.93, and 4.19.171

Filed under
Linux

I'm announcing the release of the 5.10.11 kernel.

All users of the 5.10 kernel series must upgrade.

The updated 5.10.y git tree can be found at:
	git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-5.10.y
and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser:
	https://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-s...

thanks,

greg k-h

Read more

Also: Linux 5.4.93

Linux 4.19.171

RISC-V based SoC is 5G basestaton on a chip

Filed under
Hardware

OpenRAN-based solutions with components from different vendors offer more flexibility and programmer access, with more functions running in software than hardware, typically under a Linux OS, explains ArsTechnica. However, O-RAN projects are often more expensive and power-hungry, and require more technical expertise, says the story. TechCrunch quotes Ravuri as saying O-RAN tends to provide a “clunky solution” with higher power consumption.

EdgeQ, which is compatible with OpenRAN option 7.x and option 6, promises to offer greater flexibility and openness without the power consumption, expense, and complexity of typical O-RAN projects. Many of these goals are achieved by integrating more functions on a single processor.

Read more

Also: New RISC-V hardware designs from 5G startup EdgeQ

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Felipe Borges: Call for Project ideas for Google Summer of Code 2021

    It is that time of the year again when we start gathering ideas for Google Summer Code.

    This time around we will be posting and discussing proposals in GNOME’s GitLab instance. Therefore, if you have a project idea that fits Google Summer of Code, please file an issue at https://gitlab.gnome.org/Teams/Engagement/gsoc-2021/-/issues/new using the “Proposal” template.

    Everybody is welcome to add ideas, but it would be nice to verify whether the ideas are realistic and mentorship for it will be available. We encourage you to discuss your ideas with designers in #gnome-design to get their input and plan collaboration, especially if your ideas are related to one of the core GNOME modules.

  • Standard Technology Presents Opportunities for Medical Record Data Extraction

    To address these challenges, health care can adapt the same technological approaches that have revolutionized other industries by incorporating digital tools called application programming interfaces (APIs). These tools allow personal finance websites to aggregate information from banks and credit card companies to provide consumers a complete picture of their spending habits, for example, or let travel services compare flights from multiple airlines without the user having to visit each airline’s site individually. If standard APIs were broadly adopted in health care, patients could access and compile their data from multiple providers while clinicians could process complicated information and make care recommendations. APIs would also offer other benefits, such as facilitating the exchange of clinical data among health care providers.

    This report will focus on three health care benefits of APIs:

    Patient access to data.

    The incorporation of clinical decision support (CDS) tools, such as risk calculators or apps that provide recommendations for prescribing antibiotics.

    Provider-to-provider exchange of information.

  • How the pandemic is accelerating enterprise open source adoption [Ed: Microsoft openwashing and hijack of the voice of its opposition]

    In an interview with VentureBeat, GitHub VP Mario Rodriguez said, “Open source project creation just kind of shoots up” after March. He added, “2020 is interesting because everything from a technology perspective got accelerated, and you were trying to do more and more.”

  • How SUSE Empowers our Partners

    Today, five to ten percent of all enterprise applications are containerized. According to Forrester, over the next three to four years, this will grow to over 50 percent.

    We believe that we have the right technology with Rancher, a full software stack that gives you everything you need to adopt and run containers in production with Kubernetes.

  • Top Kubernetes Management Platforms

    The open source Kubernetes container orchestration platform is the foundation of cloud native deployments and is widely used by organizations of all sizes.

    At the foundational level, Kubernetes is an open source project, originally started by Google and now developed as a multi-stakeholder effort under the auspices of the Linux Foundation’s Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF). Kubernetes enables organization to deploy, manage and scale application container workloads in an automated policy driven approach. It’s a model that also helps to enable both hybrid and multi-cloud computing, with organizations able to span Kubernetes workloads across on-premises and multiple public cloud environments as well.

First Look at MX Linux Fluxbox on the Raspberry Pi 4

Filed under
Reviews

MX Linux Fluxbox-RaspberryPi Respin is MX Linux’s first attempt to offer an AArch64 (ARM64) port for the Raspberry Pi single-board computer. The work is done by Jerry Bond and others, and let me tell you that it’s one of the best Linux on Raspberry Pi experiences I’ve tried so far in terms of performance and usability.

I’m not a fan of the Fluxbox window manager, but I understand why Jerry Bond choose it as default graphical environment for this Raspberry Pi spin of MX Linux. It’s super fast and consumes very few resources. For example, the RAM usage is always around 300MB (without any apps running), and that’s very important for older devices, such as a Raspberry Pi 3 with 2GB RAM.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

How to Get Install Docker On Ubuntu 20.04 LTS

Docker is an Open source technology that allows you to install an run application on several containers (machine) without Interfering with the host or other containers technology is similar to Virtualization, but it is more portable and easy to use. What is the type of Docker are available? There is two types of Docker are available Docker CE (Community Edition) and Docker EE (Enterprise Edition). Read more

today's howtos

  • Simple router setup with nftables

    Router setup in linux is fun and important for situations when you have only server, computer. Forwarding, firewall rules and at least 2 network interface cards is the minimal requiremnt for setting up router. Our router setup will be on Rhel 8. The installation and configuration steps are: [...]

  • find mostly doesn't need xargs today on modern Unixes

    For usage with find, all of this is unnecessary on a modern Unix and has been for some time, because find folded this into itself. Modern versions of find don't have just the traditional '-exec', which runs one command per file, but also an augmented version of it which aggregates the arguments together like xargs does. This augmented version is used by ending the '-exec' with '+' instead of ';', like so: [...]

  • Linux fmt Command – Formatting Text on the Command Line

    The fmt command is a text utility included in the GNU Core Utilities. It was originally created to format email messages at the command line. However, it can be very useful for reading any text files in the terminal. Sure, modern terminals will wrap text to fit in the window. But they don’t wrap at a word, it could split a word right down the middle. This makes it hard to read and even harder to keep your place.

  • How To Install Observium on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS - idroot

    In this tutorial, we will show you how to install Observium on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS. For those of you who didn’t know, Observium is a Network Management and Monitoring System that collects data from multiple devices using SNMP and allows you to monitor all of the network’s devices via an easy-to-use interface. It is PHP-based and uses a MySQL database to store data. This article assumes you have at least basic knowledge of Linux, know how to use the shell, and most importantly, you host your site on your own VPS. The installation is quite simple and assumes you are running in the root account, if not you may need to add ‘sudo‘ to the commands to get root privileges. I will show you through the step by step installation of Observium on Ubuntu 20.04 (Focal Fossa). You can follow the same instructions for Ubuntu 18.04, 16.04, and any other Debian based distribution like Linux Mint.

  • How to Exclude Specific File Extension While Copying Files Recursively

    As you might already know, ‘cp’ is the command line program in Linux to copy files and directories.

Contributing to KDE is easier than you think – Bug triaging

Today, 2021-01-28, is the Plasma Beta Review Day for Plasma 5.21, that is to say, Plasma 5.20.90. Right now it’s a bit after 2 a.m., so after this I’m going to bed so I can be present later. This month I’ve mostly been enjoying my post-job vacation as last year I was bordering burnout. As such I didn’t help much. Before bed I’ll be providing a few things I’ve learned about triaging, though. While this blog post isn’t specifically about the Beta Review Day, this should make the general bug triaging process clearer for you, making it quite timely. Read more

Audiocasts/Shows: Coder Radio, TLLTS, and FLOSS Weekly

  • Testing the Test | Coder Radio 398

    The guys can't help but laugh when they hear the test tests one well-known online giant is testing. You might say they get a bit testy.

  • The Linux Link Tech Show Episode 891

    brave browser, gnome 40, lottalinuxlinks is back, tablets

  • FLOSS Weekly 614: Ethics and Open Source - Openbase, Elastic vs AWS

    Matt Asay believes we need a new way to think about open source. This comes on the heels of the Elastic vs AWS controversy. Shawn Powers and new co-host Katherine Druckman join Doc Searls in a lively discussion of ethics and open source on FLOSS Weekly. The panel takes a look at three efforts currently making news: the Ethical Source Movement; Matt Asay's Infoworld post titled A New Way To Think About Open Source; and Openbase, which Venturebeat says "wants to be the Yelp for open source software packages."