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Saturday, 30 Aug 14 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 30/08/2014 - 10:26pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 30/08/2014 - 10:26pm
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 30/08/2014 - 10:26pm
Story Intel Beignet Is Working Out Surprisingly Well For OpenCL On Linux Rianne Schestowitz 30/08/2014 - 9:40pm
Story Chromebook to come with Intel Broadwell chips Roy Schestowitz 30/08/2014 - 8:31pm
Story Deepin 2014.1 Released With Bug Fixes And Minor Enhancements Roy Schestowitz 30/08/2014 - 7:48pm
Story Quod Libet 3.2.1 Review – An Almost Perfect Music Player Rianne Schestowitz 30/08/2014 - 7:34pm
Story Making Fedora work better [For me] Rianne Schestowitz 30/08/2014 - 7:19pm
Story Canonical Has Yet To Land X.Org Server 1.16 For Ubuntu 14.10 Rianne Schestowitz 30/08/2014 - 7:09pm
Story Getting Involved With The New Raspberry Pi Graphics Driver Rianne Schestowitz 30/08/2014 - 6:57pm

Leftovers: Gaming

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Gaming

today's howtos

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HowTos

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software

Intel Beignet Is Working Out Surprisingly Well For OpenCL On Linux

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
Hardware
OSS

Beignet is the project out of Intel's Open-Source Technology Center for exposing GPGPU/compute capabilities out of Ivy Bridge hardware and newer when using a fully open-source Linux stack. While Beignet differs greatly from Gallium3D's Clover state tracker, this Intel-specific open-source OpenCL implementation is working out quite well for Ubuntu Linux.

While I've been writing about Intel's Beignet project since early 2013, it's probably been about a year now since I tried out the code, which is developed by Intel's OTC graphics team in China. This weekend I tried out Beignet v0.9.2 as trying out the newest Intel OpenCL code has been on my TODO list for a while and it's been working out rather well in my initial tests.

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Chromebook to come with Intel Broadwell chips

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google

Intel is expected to launch its 5th-gen Intel Core CPUs based on Broadwell architecture by the end of this year. According to the latest leaked information, Google’s Chromebook might feature this Broadwell chip. Intel is focusing on bringing high performance CPU which has minimum power requirement with Broadwell chip.

Even though Broadwell is the scaled down version of Haswell, it will still maintain the same CPU performance as Haswell. The company is working on better performance-per-watt and lower power consumption to improve battery life of devices. Broadwell is just 14 nanometer in size.

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Deepin 2014.1 Released With Bug Fixes And Minor Enhancements

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Deepin 2014.1 was released today with numerous bug fixes meant to improve the system stability and performance as well as a few interesting enhancements / new features. Users who have already installed Deepin 2014 don't have to reinstall - a simple upgrade via the Deepin Store or command line (sudo apt-get dist-upgrade) is enough to get the latest Deepin 2014.1.

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Quod Libet 3.2.1 Review – An Almost Perfect Music Player

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Software
Reviews

It's a mystery why Quod Libet is not a more popular media player. It's been around for years and the developers have constantly worked on it. The last major update was done back in May 2014, and the software is stable and full of goodies.

Quodlibet is a Latin phrase that means "what pleases" and it's used in music to describe a piece that's a combination of multiple melodies. The name seems to relate very well to the media player and it's actually quite catchy.

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Making Fedora work better [For me]

Filed under
Red Hat

I’ve been talking to my fellow Fedora user, James [who happens to be my boss] and he’s told me a few extensions that are available for gnome 3 that make things a little better, and to be honest I like them lots.

First of all you need to go here – https://extensions.gnome.org/ [use firefox]

The first couple I have install is

Applications Menu
No Topleft Hot Corner

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Canonical Has Yet To Land X.Org Server 1.16 For Ubuntu 14.10

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Ubuntu

The Canonical X PPA offers the "X staging" packages with the new package versions providing the support. Besides the upgraded xserver package there's also version bumps to xserver-xorg-input-evdev, xserver-xorg-video-ati, xserver-xorg-video-intel, and xserver-xorg-video-nouveau that are built against the X.Org Server 1.16 ABI. Those wishing to upgrade to the X.Org Server 1.16 code can run sudo apt-add-repository ppa:canonical-x/x-staging; sudo apt-get update; sudo apt-get dist-upgrade for trying out these packages on Ubuntu 14.10 Utopic. Canonical sadly hasn't done any updates to these packages since the end of July per the Launchpad package details.

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Getting Involved With The New Raspberry Pi Graphics Driver

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Hardware

Eric Anholt, formerly a lead developer on Intel's Linux graphics driver, has been quickly working away at the VC4 Gallium3D driver and related code now being a Broadcom employee tasked with making an open-source driver for the Raspberry Pi. If you're looking to try out his in-development driver or help him out in the driver creation process, he's published a brief guide to lower the barrier to entry.

Eric published a blog post on Friday that covers the steps for building a Linux kernel that has the VC4 driver, building mainline Mesa with the VC4 driver, and also building Piglit for carrying out regression tests.

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CyanogenMod add ‘tab switching’ function to recent CM11 nightlies

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Android

Yesterday, we advised of a new call recording feature which has recently popped up on the CM nightlies. Today we have information on another new feature which seems to have recently been added to CM11 nightlies.

Those of you who are used to non-CM ROM’s will already know of this feature as it appears on other ROM’s such as Omni, Slim and Paranoid Android. So although not a novel feature this is a new feature to CM and one which users should be happy with.

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Simplenote want developers to make a GNU/Linux implementation

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Software

Matt Mullenweg founder and CEO of Automattic which is responsible for WordPress.com has reached out to people who develop software on the GNU/Linux platform to find someone who will bring the Simplenote application to GNU/Linux.

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How to set up Raspberry Pi, the little computer you can cook into DIY tech projects

Filed under
Development
Linux

You don't need an electrical engineering degree to build a robot army. With the $35 Raspberry Pi B+, you can create robots and connected devices on the cheap, with little more than an Internet connection and a bunch of spare time.

The Raspberry Pi is a computer about the size of a credit card. The darling of the do-it-yourself electronics crowd, the Pi was originally designed to teach kids computer and programming skills without the need for expensive computer labs. People have used Raspberry Pis for everything from robots to cheap home media centers.

The Pi sports USB ports, HDMI video, and a host of other peripherals. The latest version, the B+, sports 512MB of RAM and uses a MicroSD card instead of a full-size card.

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LibreOffice Ported To 64-bit ARM (AArch64)

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LibO

As more and more open-source programs get brought up for 64-bit ARM, LibreOffice is the latest to receive such AArch64 enablement.

As of today in LibreOffice Git is the initial AArch64 support. Over one thousand new lines of code were added to LibreOffice by Red Hat's Stephan Bergmann for allowing the open-source office suite to build on the ARMv8 64-bit architecture. LibreOffice already runs on many CPU architectures from x86 to Alpha and SPARC with ARM64 just being the latest.

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SUSE's Flavio Castelli on Docker's Rise Among Linux Distros

Filed under
Interviews
SUSE

Docker has only gained traction since its launch a little over a year ago as more companies join the community's efforts on a regular basis. On July 30, the first official Docker build for openSUSE was released, making this distribution the latest among many to join the fray. I connected with Flavio Castelli, a senior software engineer at SUSE, who works extensively on SUSE Linux Enterprise and has played a major role in bringing official Docker support to openSUSE. In this interview, he discuses the importance of bringing Docker to each Linux distribution, the future of Docker on SUSE Linux Enterprise, and other interesting developments in the Docker ecosystem.

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A New AMD Catalyst Linux Driver Unofficially Surfaces

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

A German web-site is hosting a yet to be officially released Catalyst Linux driver.

As pointed out in our forums there is a new Catalyst Linux driver version that's being hosted by Computerbase.de. This driver is marked Catalyst 14.201.1008 and was uploaded today for Linux along with Windows.

While this driver should work for any supported hardware (Radeon HD 5000 series and newer), it's labeled amd-catalyst-desktop-apu-linux-x86-x86-64-14.201.1008.zip. The driver version number is higher than the previous publicly released Catalyst Linux build available from AMD's web-site.

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The Fastest NVIDIA GPUs For Open-Source Nouveau With Steam Linux Gaming

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

In this article the NVIDIA hardware is being benchmarked to a similar stack from earlier this week with Ubuntu 14.04 LTS and then upgrading to the Linux 3.17 Git kernel and employing the Oibaf PPA for the upgraded xf86-video-nouveaui DDX and Mesa/Gallium3D drivers. Compared to the Radeon tests, the Nouveau driver was bumped slightly ahead to address a Nouveau driver problem that otherwise was a show-stopper. So even though it shows Mesa 10.3-devel vs. Mesa 10.4-devel, it's just a few days difference of Mesa Git due to the recent branching of Mesa 10.3. The rest of the stack was maintained the same for this Nouveau Linux gaming tests. The tested NVIDIA hardware included both old and new graphics processors:

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VMware, Nvidia Look to Bring Chromebooks to Enterprises

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google

The vendors are leveraging their respective technologies to enable the popular notebook to better handle graphics-rich applications.

VMware, Nvidia and Google want to take the Chromebook, which is increasingly popular among consumers and in such areas as education, and make it more attractive to the enterprise.

At the VMworld 2014 show this week, the three companies demonstrated how the combination of VMware's Blast Performance software and Nvidia's Grid vGPU technology will enable Chromebooks to handle graphically intensive applications, such as Adobe Illustrator CC, AutoDesk's AutoCAD and Microsoft Office, in desktop virtualization environments.

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Peach OSI Is Fresh and Juicy

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Reviews

What impresses me considerably about XFCE in Peach OSI is its fresh appeal. Its integration leaves nothing of standard XFCE out, but it rolls in a list of design features. The result is a user experience that is very pleasing. Much of Peach's appeal to more seasoned Linux users comes from its preconfigured layout. Newcomers to Linux will like its desktop appearance and intuitive operation.

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Scrivener Writing Software has a Linux Version

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Reviews

In some ways, Scrivener is the very embodiment of anti-Linux, philosophically. Scrivener is a writing program, used by authors. In Linux, one strings together well developed and intensely tested tools on data streams to produce a result. So, to author a complex project, create files and edit them in a simple text editor, using some markdown. Keep the files organized in the file system and use file names carefully chosen to keep them in order in their respective directories. when it comes time to make project-wide modifications, use grep and sed to process all of the files at once or selected files. Eventually, run the files through LaTeX to produce beautiful output. Then, put the final product in a directory where people can find it on Gopher.

Gopher? Anyway …

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