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A Review of Slackware 11

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Reviews
Slack

I've been using Linux for well over 4 years now as my primary OS. I started way back with Slackware, and to this day I can't stop slackin. With the newly released Slackware 11, let's see how much has changed since I first fell head over heals for the distro so many years ago.

- The Objective -

To replace a SUSE Linux installation running as my media/file/test server with a solid, lightweight distro to take on the same functions in under a quarter of the footprint.The SUSE Linux currently installed takes up around 4Gb of space (default install plus modifications) and that space can be used more effectively for storage.

In the past I've had Slackware installations with fully usable desktops in well under a 2Gb footprint. Mind you, when I say 'usable' I mean fully usable to my desktop needs. This includes many office, media, and development applications and their supporting libraries. So all-in-all that's not too bad.

That said, I fully expect to be able to squeeze this install to within a gigabyte, if not much smaller. Given what I will require this box to do, I don't think I have to worry too much about hitting that target.

Full Story.

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