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Leftovers: Software

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  • Fasd – A Commandline Tool That Offers Quick Access to Files and Directories

    Fasd (pronounced as “fast“) is command-line productivity booster, a self-contained POSIX shell script which enables quick and more efficient access to files and directories.

  • What’s new in SSHGuard 2.0

    SSHGuard is an intrusion prevention utility that parses logs and automatically blocks misbehaving IP addresses with the system firewall. It’s less configurable than the better-known Fail2Ban but has a smaller resource footprint and ships with full IPv6 support. The newly released SSHGuard version 2.0 have been made easier to configure for new users. It also gained support for FirewallD, ipset, and ipfilter firewall backends on Linux; as well as Capsicum sandboxing support on *BSD.

    While we’re still waiting for the next release of Fail2Ban with IPv6 support, I took a look around at some of the alternatives and found an interesting option in SSHGuard. I had to address some Linux compatibility issues when getting started with SSHGuard as the development team was mostly focused on FreeBSD. I submitted patches for those issues and got more involved in the development and release of SSHGuard 2.0 in the process.

  • Steghide – An Easy way to Hide Confidential Data Inside Images and Sound Objects in Linux

    As of now, we have wrote few articles about the same topics but the way of method is different, how to hide files and folders in Linux & how to protect files and folders with password to safe the personal documents from others. It help us to send the secret information over the Internet like mail.

    Today we are going to discuss the same topic once again but the method is completely different. I mean, i will show you, how to hide sensitive data inside image and audio files using steghide utility.

  • 3 Emacs extensions for getting organized

    In the colophon to his book, Just a Geek, actor and writer Wil Wheaton wrote that he wanted to use Emacs to write the book but "couldn't find the text editor." Wheaton was joking, of course, but he highlighted an important point about Emacs: it's gone way beyond its roots as a tool for editing text.

    Thanks to its many modes (extensions that change the way the editor behaves), you can use Emacs for just about anything: browsing the web, reading and sending email, publishing blog posts and books, managing databases, learning with flashcards, and much more.

More in Tux Machines

Linux 4.9.88, 4.4.122, and 3.18.100, More Security Patches in Linux 4.16

Ubuntu MATE 18.04 LTS Will Ship with a New Default Layout Called "Familiar"

Ubuntu MATE's lead developer Martin Wimpress announced that the forthcoming Ubuntu MATE 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) operating system would sport a brand-new default layout for new installations. If you plan on installing or reinstalling Ubuntu MATE this spring, the upcoming 18.04 release sports a new default layout called "Familiar." According to Martin Wimpress, the new layout is based on the Traditional layout with the menu-bar replaced by Brisk Menu, which was used in previous Ubuntu MATE releases. The decision to replace the Traditional layout with the Familiar one was taken due to some technical issues when the development team tried to update it for Ubuntu MATE 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver). Traditional will still be available, but not enabled by default, and bears no changes. Read more

Atom 1.25

  • Atom 1.25
    Atom 1.25 has been released on our stable channel and includes GitHub package improvements, improved syntax highlighting and code folding, Python and HTML language improvements and more.
  • GitHub's Atom Hackable Text Editor Gets Performance, Responsiveness Improvements
    GitHub released a new stable version of their open-source and cross-platform Atom hackable text editor with a bunch of enhancements, bug fixes, a new Electron version, as well as performance and responsiveness improvements. Atom 1.25 is now available for GNU/Linux, macOS, and Windows platforms, and it is packed with improvements for the GitHub package to let you stage and view changes affecting file mode modifications, additions to symbolic links, as well as the ability for the Diff view to no longer reset its scrolling position.

Linux Mint 19 'Tara' Cinnamon will be faster

Is Linux Mint slow? Hell, no! The operating system is plenty fast. Speed is in the eye of the beholder, however, and the Mint developers apparently thought app-launching seemed slow when using the Cinnamon desktop environment. They didn't have any proof, but they felt that both Mate and Xfce were faster in this regard. Well, rather than allow their feelings to remain unproven, the Mint devs decided to come up with a speed test to see if they were correct. Guess what? They were! Windows build time was four times slower with Cinnamon compared to Metacity, while recovery time was nearly four times slower too. So yes, app-launching on Cinnamon -- as of today -- is slow comparatively. The big benefit to pinpointing a problem, however, is that it is the first step in solving it. And so, Linux Mint 19 Cinnamon will be faster as a result. Read more