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Linux 4.10.12

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Linux

I'm announcing the release of the 4.10.12 kernel.

All users of the 4.10 kernel series must upgrade.

The updated 4.10.y git tree can be found at:
git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-4.10.y
and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser:
http://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-st...

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Also: Linux 4.9.24

Linux 4.4.63

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