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Invictus Firewall

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MDV

We’ll be shipping Mandriva Linux 2007 with an extra security feature we’re very proud of: Invictus Firewall.

Invictus is latin for unconquered and the title of a famous poem by William Ernest Henley. Invictus Firewall is a redundant firewall. Drakinvictus is the wizard that will help you to configure it, in your language when available. That’s as Mandrivian as it gets.

Sam is a networking and security wizard. Rumours say he’s on the right spot to know what you need to protect your network. Colleagues say his help is valuable when designing protocols to communicate with certain employees from the communication agency across the street. Anyway, here’s a diagram of what your network could look like with Invictus Firewall (click on the image to enlarge it):

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