Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Ray Noorda, Father Of Network Computers, Dies

Filed under
Obits

Ray Noorda, the Novell Inc. founder who battled Microsoft Corp. in the early years of network computers, died Monday of complications from Alzheimer's disease. He was 82.

Noorda, the so-called Father of Network Computing, had suffered from Alzheimer's for years and died at his modest home in Orem, 35 miles south of Salt Lake City, according to a statement from family members.

Noorda became chief executive of Novell in 1983 and made it a software powerhouse, dominating the market for products that manage corporate networks and let individual computers share files and printers.

``Ray was one of the innovators of the Utah Miracle,'' Gov. Jon Huntsman said. ``He launched what would become Utah's technology sector. He has left behind a monumental legacy and we are all in his debt.''

Michael Dell, chairman of Dell Inc., and Kevin Rollins, Dell's president and chief executive, issued a joint statement praising Noorda as a pioneer of the computer age. They said his file-sharing program has become the de facto standard for the world's computers.

Full Story.

Good-bye Mr. Noorda, I'll miss you.

He wasn't a developer. He was just a tough businessman with the nerve to take on Microsoft, which he saw as a threat to dominate the desktop long before everyone else did.

Linux and open-source owes Noorda another, more direct, debt.

When Novell bought Unix and USL (Unix Systems Laboratories) from AT&T, rather than continue to fight with BSDI (Berkeley Software Design Inc.) over possible Unix intellectual property rights violations in BSD/OS (an early, commercial BSD Unix), Noorda famously declared that he'd rather compete in the marketplace than in court, and the two sides came to an amiable agreement.

Without the threat of a lawsuit hanging over the BSD Unixes, and later Linux, open-source developers were free to create the operating systems we use today.

Full Story.

----
You talk the talk, but do you waddle the waddle?

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

OpenBSD and NetBSD

Security: Twitter and Facebook

  • Twitter banned Kaspersky Lab from advertising in Jan
     

    Twitter has banned advertising from Russian security vendor Kaspersky Lab since January, the head of the firm, Eugene Kaspersky, has disclosed.  

  • When you go to a security conference, and its mobile app leaks your data
     

    A mobile application built by a third party for the RSA security conference in San Francisco this week was found to have a few security issues of its own—including hard-coded security keys and passwords that allowed a researcher to extract the conference's attendee list. The conference organizers acknowledged the vulnerability on Twitter, but they say that only the first and last names of 114 attendees were exposed.

  • The Security Risks of Logging in With Facebook
     

    In a yet-to-be peer-reviewed study published on Freedom To Tinker, a site hosted by Princeton's Center for Information Technology Policy, three researchers document how third-party tracking scripts have the capability to scoop up information from Facebook's login API without users knowing. The tracking scripts documented by Steven Englehardt, Gunes Acar, and Arvind Narayanan represent a small slice of the invisible tracking ecosystem that follows users around the web largely without their knowledge.

  • Facebook Login data hijacked by hidden JavaScript trackers
     

    If you login to websites through Facebook, we've got some bad news: hidden trackers can suck up more of your data than you'd intended to give away, potentially opening it up to abuse.

Beginner Friendly Gentoo Based Sabayon Linux Has a New Release

The team behind Sabayon Linux had issued a new release. Let’s take a quick look at what’s involved in this new release. Read more

Android Leftovers