Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

AI versus AI: N.E.R.O. on Linux

Filed under

If you've ever been frustrated with the artificial intelligence (AI) in video games, then you are a prime candidate for Neuro-Evolving Robotic Operatives (N.E.R.O.), a cross-platform combat game where the key to winning is training your own intelligent non-player characters. On the field of play, the only rule is "let the best AI win." I tested my skills with the Linux client, and found N.E.R.O. to be a very different sort of game.

N.E.R.O. was first developed in 2003 at the University of Texas at Austin (UT). At UT's 2003 GameDev conference, AI researcher Ken Stanley proposed a game based around the idea of training soldier robots in real time, then pitting them against each other. It grew into an ongoing research project that involves a number of UT faculty and students.

The game has two distinct modes. In training mode, you play in a virtual sandbox, setting up enemies and obstacles, then unleashing your robot teams on them. The robots use neural networks to respond to game events, so you teach them by issuing rewards or penalties for events such as hitting a target, avoiding getting hit themselves, and standing their ground.

When you think you have a decent team, you can save your work and enter battle mode.

Full Story.

More in Tux Machines

New ELF Linker from the LLVM Project

We have been working hard for a few months now to rewrite the ELF support in lld, the LLVM linker. We are happy to announce that it has reached a significant milestone: it is now able to bootstrap LLVM, Clang, and itself and pass all tests on x86-64 Linux and FreeBSD with the speed expected of an LLVM project. Read more

Altair to Open Source PBS Professional HPC Technology in 2016

“Altair’s open source contribution is valuable and will help advance the work of the OpenHPC Collaborative Project,” said Jim Zemlin, executive director at The Linux Foundation. “By working together to build and extend new technologies for the world’s most complex computing systems, Altair and other members of OpenHPC can accelerate exascale computing.” The open licensing system is scheduled to be released to the open source community in mid-2016. Read more

Thunderbird to be separated from Mozilla

This is a long-ish message. It covers general topics about Thunderbird and the future, and also the topics of the Foundation involvement (point 9) and the question of merging repositories (point 11). Naturally, I believe it’s worth the time to read through the end. Read more

Deepin 15. This could be the best Linux desktop distribution of the year

Deepin 15 Alpha 2 (or is it Deepin 2015 Alpha 2?) is the latest pre-stable release of what will become Deepin 15 (or Deepin 2015). It was made available for download and testing yesterday. Deepin is based on Ubuntu Desktop and developed by some fine folks in China. Read more