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Crucial Radeon X850 XT 256MB PCI-E

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A very large percentage of PC users are compromised of PC gamers. Gamers do not place silence, versatility or even value of their system as their top priority, but o­nly 3D performance. While most of us search and evaluate the best price to performance ratio and solution, the majority of Gamers simply want the best there is when it comes to a video card. However, the best video cards are usually the most expensive. Crucial came forward to offer this portion of that market offering the ATi Radeon X850 XT 256MB card following the reference design, which currently is o­ne of the fastest cards o­n the planet. Let us see what this card is made of and what it can offer the hardcore enthusiast.

Here are the specifications of the card, taken from the manufacturer's site:


  • Incredible 3-D gaming performance

  • PCI Express™ 16X technology with 16 parallel pixel pipeline utilization
  • 256MB of DDR3 memory
  • 256-bit quad-channel GDDR3 memory interface
  • Dual display support for simultaneous viewing o­n analog and high-definition digital monitors
  • Powerthrottling technology for cooler running temperature
  • Integrated SmartVision™ technology, providing high-definition gaming
  • Complete DirectX® 9.0 support
  • TV-out functionality

Sophisticated Features

  • SMARTSHADER™ HD: Users will experience complex, movie-quality effects in next-generation 3-D games and graphics.

  • VIDEOSHADER™HD: Enables seamless integration and use of pixel shaders to accelerate video processing and provide enhanced visuals.
  • SMOOTHVISION™ HD: Enhances image quality by removing jagged edges and bringing out fine texture detail without compromising performance.
  • HYPER Z™ HD: Ensures optimized hardware performance by excluding irrelevant data not visible to the end user, enabling new levels of rendering.

General Specifications

  • Powered by RADEON™ X850 XT Series VPU, driven by 16-pipe rendering architecture

  • Full support for DirectX® 9.0 and the latest OpenGL® functionality 256-bit DDR memory interface, featuring HYPER Z™ HD bandwidth-conserving technology
  • 256MB GDDR3 memory
  • 400MHz RAMDAC
  • Native x16 lane PCI Express support
  • VGA connector, TV-out connector

Summing up, I believe that a 9.5 out of 10 score and our Xtreme Performance Award is a most fair evaluation for this card. I cannot give it a 10 because the price is restrictive for a large percentage of PC users, including even hardcore gamers, but performance is really top notch.

Full Review.

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